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Zhicheng Lai
Zhicheng Lai, Enrolled Agent(EA)
Category: Tax
Satisfied Customers: 811
Experience:  5 years tax preparing experience
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can you claim house repair on your federal income tax return

Customer Question

like painting, repairs
Submitted: 11 years ago.
Category: Tax
Expert:  Zhicheng Lai replied 11 years ago.
Do you have a homebased business? Do you have a home office?
Customer: replied 11 years ago.
Reply to Zhicheng Lai's Post: like painting and repairing damaged wood from a storm.
Expert:  Zhicheng Lai replied 11 years ago.
My question is : Do you run any business from your home?
Customer: replied 11 years ago.
Reply to Zhicheng Lai's Post: no
Expert:  Zhicheng Lai replied 11 years ago.
How much damage did the storm causing to your home?
Customer: replied 11 years ago.
Reply to Zhicheng Lai's Post: take out a loan and $8,000.00. Had to replace air condition unit and paint the outside and replace some wood damage.
Expert:  Zhicheng Lai replied 11 years ago.
Usually, the repair of personal property is not deductible. The improvement can be added into the cost basis of the property, in the event you sell the house, you will get less captial gain. such as replacement of the AC.
If the loss is due to the casulty loss:
Figure the amount of your loss using the following steps.
1)Determine your adjusted basis in the property before the casualty or theft.

2)Determine the decrease in fair market value (FMV) of the property as a result of the casualty or theft.

From the smaller of the amounts you determined in (1) and (2), subtract any insurance or other reimbursement you received or expect to receive.

For personal-use property and property used in performing services as an employee, apply the deduction limits, discussed later, to determine the amount of your deductible loss.
Individuals may deduct personal property losses that are not covered by insurance or other reimbursements, but they must first subtract $100 for each casualty event and then subtract ten percent of their adjusted gross income from their total casualty losses for the year.

http://www.irs.gov/publications/p547/index.html