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Christopher B, Esq.
Christopher B, Esq., Attorney
Category: Social Security
Satisfied Customers: 2983
Experience:  associate attorney
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Are some social security benefits non-taxable? my grandson

Customer Question

Are some social security benefits non-taxable?
JA: These retirement benefits are supposed to help us but they can be so complicated! The Retirement Expert will help you get the most benefits propertly. Please tell me more, so we can help you best.
Customer: my grandson receives benefits because he is bi-polar and diagnosed with ADHD. Is this taxable?
JA: Is there anything else important you think the Retirement Accountant should know?
Customer: not that I can think of.
Submitted: 8 months ago.
Category: Social Security
Expert:  Christopher B, Esq. replied 8 months ago.

My name is ***** ***** I will be helping you today. Thank you for your question and for using justanswer.com. Give me a bit and I will get you an answer drafted.

Expert:  Christopher B, Esq. replied 8 months ago.

If he only earns social security then yes SS normally are untaxable. If he makes an earned wage plus and social security, some may be taxable. From the IRS:

(1) If you're a single filer and in 2016 your combined income as defined above is between $25,000 and $34,000, up to 50% of your Social Security benefits may be taxed. If your combined income is more than $34,000, up to 85% of your benefits may be taxed.

(2) If you're married and filing jointly in 2015, combined income of between $32,000 and $44,000 means that up to 50% of your Social Security benefits may be taxed. Combined income topping $44,000 means up to 85% of your benefits may be taxed.

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Expert:  Christopher B, Esq. replied 8 months ago.

Just checking back in, do you have any further questions?