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ShawnA
ShawnA, SS Expert, CPA, Professor, CFP. CGMA, Business Consultant, Professor, PFS , Decades of experience helping clients..
Category: Social Security
Satisfied Customers: 2884
Experience:  SS Expert, CPA, Professor, CFP. CGMA, Business Consultant, Professor, PFS I have decades of experience helping clients..
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My wife is 68 and started receiving her social security payments

Customer Question

My wife is 68 and started receiving her social security payments at 62, currently $1,294, plus her teacher retirement pension,currently $2,367. I'm 57 and drawing a monthly $956 military retirement pension. I plan to work as long as I can and, hopefully, delay drawing social security until age 70. Would I qualify for spousal benefits prior to that and still be able to work? What is the maximum household social security benefit? Would my social security benefit be reduced in any way due to my military pension?
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Social Security
Expert:  ShawnA replied 2 years ago.
Hello. My specialty is focusing on YOUR Financial needs. Financial Planner/Business Owner for 20 years. CPA,PFS,QFP,GMMA.
Hello and welcome.
You cannot qualify for spousal benefits because you are not age 60. At age 62 you qualify BUT:
See the link below:
http://www.socialsecuritychoices.com/info/workclaim.php
Spousal benefits can be affected by excess earnings in two ways. First, if a spouse works and is under full retirement age, excess earnings will affect spousal benefits in the same fashion as described above (a $1 reduction in spousal benefits for every $2 or $3 in excess earnings, depending on the spouse's age). Excess earnings by a spouse affect spousal benefits only. There is no feedback effect on the primary retiree's benefits
I will offer you a call (a mere 5) so we can discuss what other options you may have.