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Dr. Deb
Dr. Deb, Dog Veterinarian
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 10261
Experience:  I have owned, bred and shown dogs for over 40 years.
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When should I seek medical attention laboring olde English

Customer Question

When should I seek medical attention for my laboring olde English bulldog if she seems distressed
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Dog
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
Hello, I'm Dr. Deb. I will do my best to assist you today.
It would be helpful if you could provide a bit more information about Pebbles. For example:
1.Is she in respiratory distress or having trouble breathing?
2. Is she having difficulty walking?
3. Is she pregnant and about to deliver puppies?
4. How long has she been having the symptoms that concern you?
There may be slight delay in receiving my response since I have to type up an answer for you. Thanks for your patience. Deb
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
I apologize for the lack of information upon providing my questioning
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
I of course has any responsible pet owner would like to make sure before providing additional information in detail that I was in good hands or rather my dog was in good hands because she's not just the dog she's family
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
As for your questioning she is not in respiratory depression for respiratory just the distress nor is she having difficulty breathing just panting however the panting is not abnormal it is what to be expected and her breed as well as during labor
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
No worries but I'd be glad to help if I know the issue which concerns you about Pebbles:)
I absolutely understand your position and share it:)
Is she pregnant then?
Deb
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
If you could please call me I already submitted to call it would be a lot easier for me thank you
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
After speaking with you if I can go back to the message and add files such as pictures if that would help at all then of course that would not be a problem
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
Unfortunately, I'm not set up to answer phone calls; I'm sorry about that:( I'll be happy to opt out so that another expert may be able to speak with you on the phone if this is the only way you'd like to discuss your concerns about Pebbles.
I should mention that there are license liability issues for some vets when it comes to communicating with pet owners this way so I'm not sure how long you might have to wait for assistance.
However, if you'd like to continue our conversation via this format, please let me know.
You can add pictures from your computer (not your phone); the following link walks you through the process
http://ww2.justanswer.com/how-do-i-send-photo-or-file-expertDeb
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
my phone is charged and I read your message about typing would take a bit longer for your replying back to my questions and concerns.. however it's also difficult for me to text or type due to A recent head on collision with a drunk driver which severely injured my right arm and I am recovering from a major surgery I am awaiting your call and thank you again for your time and consideration
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
Please disregard the last message as to calling me I understand if you are not able to call I do not mind waiting for you to reply that by typing I can actually do talk to text on my iPhone which makes it easier on my arm then to sit there and have to text my concerns as I do not want to take any shortcuts and would like to be thorough
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
As long as you feel confident that you can assist me via text or messaging and that I do not need to speak to someone else via phone then I prefer to continue speaking with you
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
I don't have a problem communicating this way since it's how I assist all of the pet owners on this site.
I'm concerned that it may be difficult for you; however, if you're willing to proceed, I'm fine with it.
Deb
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
Please bear with me as I am trying to read your messages and answer them however I do have a question regarding your message explaining about license liability
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
I don't have a problem communicating this way since it's how I assist all of the pet owners on this site; however, I'm just not certain what concerns you about Pebbles.
I'm concerned that it may be difficult for you; however, if you're willing to proceed, I'm fine with it.
License liability issues: For medical professions, we require a state license to practice. Since it's highly likely that I don't have a license in the state in which you live, I would be essentially practicing without one if I discuss issues on the telephone with owners. This is because those conversations can't be monitored; whatever I type to you can be, if that makes sense.
Additionally, medical experts on this site can only provide advice or observations; we aren't supposed to "practice vet medicine" since we don't have a client/patient relationship (we can't physically exam our patients in other words).
I hope the above makes sense.
Deb
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
I am able to continue communicating with you Through talk to text however I need to disable the text alerts because when you send a message or reply I am in the process of messaging you and then it gets erased due to the Text notifications
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
To prevent the loss of messages that I have been trying to send you if you would give me one minute so I can disable the text notifications that you are applying since I am on the website and currently speaking with you
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
OK doctored thank you so much for your patience and consideration I just disabled the text notifications so let me go ahead and read the messages you sent me regarding specific questioning so I can answer you accordingly
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
Yes my old English bulldog is pregnant and she is a few days past her due date
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
Are you still with me Dr. Deb
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
I am not asking specifically for medical advice recommendations home remedies etc. I respect the information and knowledge your website provides and as long as we sharing my concerns and questioning it is not to the point where you feel as though I should not be reaching out in this manner of veterinarian assistance
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
I think we're on the same page now:)
And, yep, I'm still here.
Sorry for all the questions but now that I know the problem, I'm going to need a little more information:
1. How are you determining her due date? From when she was bred or from progesterone testing?
2. Has she delivered puppies before?
3. Have you been monitoring her temperature for a decline?
4. She sounds like she may be in Stage 1 labor; how long (in hours) has she been panting?
I will probably have all the information I need to respond to you when I receive these answers but give me a few minutes since I don't have talk to text:) Thanks for your patience. Deb
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
I think I found a quicker and easier solution to answering your questioning as accurately as possible
I will copy and paste the questions from your last message and then I will put a space in between each question and answer accordingly how does that sound
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
That sounds good to me; whatever works best for you. Deb
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
1.How are you determining her due date? From when she was bred or from progesterone testing?
ANSWER: I have determined her due date in both of the methods you mentioned in your question.
2. Has she delivered puppies before?
ANSWER: yes she has given birth naturally in the past in fact to be exact she's had two previous litters that again were successful and did not at all cause me to concern about her ability to birth naturally and there were absolutely no complications and she did outstanding with labor and delivery as well as an excellent mother!
3. Have you been monitoring her temperature for a decline?
ANSWER: yes ma'am I have been monitoring her temperature and very much aware of the signs in the decrease of her temperature confirming the onsets of labor. Usual temperature should read between 101-102 degrees and once a pregnant dogs temperature drops below 100 degrees then it's time to begin setting up the necessary items needed on hand to assist her in delivery of course if necessary.
4. She sounds like she may be in Stage 1 labor; how long (in hours) has she been panting?
ANSWER: she typically pants more often than other breeds but I have noticed the increased panting since around 7am
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
I really do appreciate your time and consideration and dedication in assisting me I hope that I am not taking up too much of your time especially while trying to accurately answer your questions for me as I want to be as thorough as possible this way you can assist me the best way that you can as well as I can provide you with the most detailed and accurate answers
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
Thanks so much for the additional information. And, you're more than welcome.
You sound like a very well informed owner and breeder which is great:)
You're extremely fortunate that she's whelped on her own since I know you know that this breed has a high incidence of c-sections.
And, you probably already know that determining whelping dates from breeding dates are practically meaningless for many females since the traditional 63-65 days from the time of first breeding is not a perfect formula. A range of potential due dates from 56-70 days is more accurate.
But if you were progesterone testing her to time her ovulation and best time to breed, then we should be able to narrow down her due date which I also assume you've already done.
Her due date would be 9 weeks, plus or minus one day from when she ovulated.
Having said that, though, if she only has one or two pups to deliver, she might go 2 days beyond the 9 weeks mark. What you may also already know is that if there's only 1-2 babies, they may not trigger stage 1 labor at all, thus requiring a c-section.
So, important factors are:
1. Number of pups she has inside of her
2. When she ovulated
3. How long she may be in stage 1 labor (if she is). I probably live in a different time zone than you do; my time is about 4:30pm; if she's been in stage 1 since 7 am (my time), I wouldn't be too worried just yet.
All of the above will determine when it's time to seek vet attention.
If she's already two days past her due date (9 weeks from ovulation) and she's in stage 1 labor, then I'd wait a while longer to see if she's going to whelp on her own.
However, if she's in stage 1 labor for more than 24 hours without a pup being produced, then I'd have her seen.
My apologies for the long winded response, but as you know trying to figure out when a female is going to deliver is not quite yet a science; there are too many variables to pinpoint everything exactly.
But, let me know if you have additional questions after you read this, especially if it's not clear.
Deb
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
I checked her temperature last night or early morning at around 2 AM and I'm located in Killeen Texas and the time here currently is 3:19pm. I noticed that her temperature was at hundred degrees even. However I stayed up all throughout the night to keep a close eye on her and checked her temperature again around six to 6:30 AM and her temperature read 99.5 degrees at this point she began to pant heavier than usual so I prepared everything because she also showed signs of slight contractions and I also noticed after she use the bathroom urinating she dropped a mucous plug or membrane. My other concern at this hour was she began to dry heave (kind of similar to when i pregnant and in active labor opting to go natural no drugs or pain Meds) also I noticed that her legs seemed a little shaky which I understand is normal during labor and delivery.
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
As you probably already know, not all bitches will experience a temperature drop 10-24 hours prior to delivery although the majority of them will.
If there's a small litter, though, most of them DON'T experience one.
So we can't entirely rely on this to determine when she's going to deliver.
However, it still sounds to me as if she's in Stage 1. Nausea, panting, pacing, shivering, chewing, scratching at the floor...all can be seen at this stage.
If she doesn't start to have active contractions within the next 12 hours, then I'd have her seen.
If she free whelped before, then most likely she will again...unless she's only carrying a small number of pups.
Deb
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
Again I sincerely ***** ***** time and please do not apologize for any delay in response if anything I cannot thank you enough for the time that you are providing me. I am very much educated with her breed and aware that English Bulldogs are unable to mate naturally and also require a C-section and weekly x-rays/ultrasounds to determine an exact due date this way they can schedule the C-section a week prior to her due date to avoid her going into labor however again I have an OLDE English bulldog they are much larger/taller than the English bulldogs and are able to give birth naturally as long as 1. There's no history of complicated labor and deliveries on her family tree so to speak as well as 2. That she doesn't have a titled pelvis in which is not uncommon among this breed and of course the only way to rule out the possibility of a titled pelvis is by having a vet exam n X-ray prior to ever considering to breed her..in which of course there's n family history of complications as well as she's been evaluated years ago prior to considering to breed her by the use of an xray to determine if she had a titled pelvis
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
Also I am aware that once her temperature drops below 100 degrees that if she has yet to deliver a puppy then this is definitely a red flag and would need to be taken to an emergency veterinarian office
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
Glad that I can help:)
You're very fortunate to have a breed who doesn't require a c-section for most deliveries...or at least one of them who free whelps and doesn't appear to have any issues which would prevent her from delivering on her own this time:)
I suspect you're going to have puppies relatively soon but at least you know when to seek assistance if you don't.
Deb
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
I Don't want to be taking up too much of your time but do you think it's udea to maybe send you a Picture of her area below to show you how enlarged and swollen it is
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
No worries since that's what I'm here for:)
You probably won't be able to send a picture from your phone although I'd love to see a picture. I believe you have to send them from a computer but you can try:
http://ww2.justanswer.com/how-do-i-send-photo-or-file-expert
Deb
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
My only concerns about this current litter was the male/stud was an English bulldog and had a rather large or stocky statue
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
I might share your concerns as well but you'll know soon enough if dystocia is going to be a problem once she starts contracting.
Hopefully, not. Deb
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
Unfortunately, I just got a call from my neighbor who has some health issues so I'm going to have to step away from my computer to go help her.
I think you're probably in a holding pattern for now but if you have additional questions about her, I'll respond when I log back on (which shouldn't be too long).
My apologies for the inconvenience. Deb
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
However again my female in an olde English bulldog and taller than the stud but he has a much larger shoulder span or width than the previous studs.. I was informed by my local veterinarian that this would not be an issue of concern and also stated that since she had success in whelping naturally in the past that regardless of the stud used in this litter and the width of his shoulders and blocky head wouldnt require follow up appts for X-rays and definitely to not concern myself the possibility of any complications during labor due to the stud being larger than past stud..however I personally disagreed with this vets medical advise or claims expressed to me on how I shouldnt be concerned with the possibility of labor complications because regardless of a stud being larger meaning stocky wise or even being much much smaller and even willing to use let's say a pug for example being the stud of this litter..regardless there's always a possibility of running into complications and in my opinion I felt like this vet in whom I entrusted with my beloved pet was kind of stunning to hear him tell me to not prepare for any possible complications..does that make sense to you or being honest here am I the one whose incorrect here
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
I Think I am able to upload pictures through here
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
Please let me know if you are able to receive them I cropped them down to size
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
She's rea not toI photo energetic right now
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
Here's the last one of her face in which I think it's fair to say she's uncomfortable
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
I'm sorry that my neighbor took longer than I expected.
Hopefully, things have progressed since we last spoke but looking at the pictures you sent (thanks by the way for sending them), she certainly looks ready to deliver her babies very soon.
And, she certainly looks as if she has more than just one or two in there, doesn't it???
She's a beautiful girl but clearly not looking quite her best but then that's to be expected, under the circumstances.
I really hate to disagree with other professionals and perhaps your vet was just trying to reassure you but I'd have to agree with you: complications are always possible during the whelping process even though things have gone smoothly before. In the majority of cases they do, of course, but speaking professionally and personally, complications can develop when you least expect them.
It's always best to be as prepared as possible but sometimes life still manages to throw us a curve-ball when we least expect it.
If past experience is anything to go by, whenever I've completely reassured a pet owner that everything was going to be okay, it wasn't! So, you'll not hear me say those words very often.
Deb
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 2 years ago.
Hi,

I'm just following up on our conversation about Pebbles. How is everything going?

Dr. Deb