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Dr. Andy
Dr. Andy, Medical Director
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 30036
Experience:  UC Davis Graduate, Interests: Dermatology, Internal Medicine, Pain Management
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my dog dashchund has a fat pocket on her side and we were a

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my dog dashchund has a fat pocket on her side and we were a the beach on thur. and another dog bit her. he did not break the skin, but her fat pocket is smaller. I think he may have poped it. she has a little pain when I pich her up, but has been acting about the same. if it is poped what can happen?
thank you
Hello,
Fat deposits or lipomas are simply a distribution of fat in the subcutaneous tissue under the skin. They can't really pop, get smaller, etc...
So, the good news is if the skin did not break, the chances for getting infected should be really low. If it seems smaller, that I cannot explain.
My greatest concern is the underlying discomfort. What I know for sure is there is inflammation and like bruising under the skin.
So, ideally, getting a good non-steroidal anti-inflammatory from the vet and an evaluation would be strongly advised.


The only over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory I recommend in dogs (NOT CATS) is aspirin. Due to potential toxicity issues if not dosed correctly, many veterinarians do not consider Tylenol, Ibuprofen (Advil), and Aleve safe.
You can give 10mg per pound of body weight up to every 12 hours. Just remember, there are different pill sizes for aspirin, so look to see if it is an adult pill, extra strength, etc…
Aspirin can be upsetting to the stomach, so discontinue if any digestive upset and definitely consult a vet if not helpful.

***Do not give aspirin or any other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication if your pet is already on prednisone or any other anti-inflammatory medication***
Severe stomach and intestinal ulcers can result from giving a pet aspirin, tylenol or ibuprofen when they are also on medications like Rimadyl, Deramaxx, Prednisone, Metecam, Zubrin, and Previcox***

Good Luck
Dr. Andy



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The answer provided is for information only. Unfortunately, I cannot legally prescribe medications or offer a definitive diagnosis without performing a physical examination. If you have any concerns please contact your primary veterinarian, or contact an ER facility if this is an emergency. Please excuse any delays in my responses, as I regularly attend to hospitalized patients and daily examinations. REMEMBER: Even after you click "ACCEPT" and your question closes, you can still review our discussion.
Customer: replied 6 years ago.
My vet said it was a fat pocket, it feels like a balloon filled with water. it is A LOT smaller now. should I take her to emergency room or can I wait till tom.
Well, if filled with fluid, it is not a lipoma or fat.

Fluid would suggest a cyst, seroma (a swelling that is created by a inflammatory reaction), or abscess.

If there is a distinct change under the skin, it would be worth having a vet evaluate it. Since I am not confident, at all, about what was there, I lean towards more immediate examination. Plus, you can get the better pain medication anyway.

Dr. Andy



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I greatly appreciate when you click “ACCEPT” if you have found the advice helpful or informative, so I may receive credit for the answer. Receiving feedback and bonuses is happily welcomed.
The answer provided is for information only. Unfortunately, I cannot legally prescribe medications or offer a definitive diagnosis without performing a physical examination. If you have any concerns please contact your primary veterinarian, or contact an ER facility if this is an emergency. Please excuse any delays in my responses, as I regularly attend to hospitalized patients and daily examinations. REMEMBER: Even after you click "ACCEPT" and your question closes, you can still review our discussion.
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