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Dr. Briggs
Dr. Briggs, Multi-Species Vet
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 101
Experience:  16+ yrs private practice with many species
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my dog has a partially collapsed lung and she is currently

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my dog has a partially collapsed lung and she is currently in an oxygen tank at the shelter that I purchased her from. However, she has had the partially collapsed lung since their misdiagnosis after I got her. She is 2 1/2 yrs old. They stated that she has mucus in her lung (non-bacterial). My question is whether there is some form of medicine to clear this mucus out of her lungs to restore to her old health
Sorry to hear about your dog!! I want to be sure I understand you correctly - how long have you had her? How long ago were her last xrays showing the collapsed lung?
Customer: replied 8 years ago.
they took an x-ray on Dec. 1 - showed her partially collapsed lung lobe still same no worse. Took another one on Dec. 3 still same. did trachialosch- to get culture from mucus in lungs- non-bacterial. their answer for everything is putting the dog to sleep. I figured that if I can treat and kill whatever mucus that has built up in her lungs to labor her breathing, then I might have a chance of restoring her back to her "normal" self as a dog with her condition. She was always able to fight with my other dog and be the alpha dog. Only when she ran around extensively would she be out of breath.
Customer: replied 8 years ago.
they took an x-ray on Dec. 1 - showed her partially collapsed lung lobe still same no worse. Took another one on Dec. 3 still same. did trachialosch- to get culture from mucus in lungs- non-bacterial. their answer for everything is putting the dog to sleep. I figured that if I can treat and kill whatever mucus that has built up in her lungs to labor her breathing, then I might have a chance of restoring her back to her "normal" self as a dog with her condition. She was always able to fight with my other dog and be the alpha dog. Only when she ran around extensively would she be out of breath. I researched PetAlive - RespoK- as a potential holistic alternative, but I didn't want to go tampering in an area that I have not done further research.
Understood - you obviously care for her a lot or you wouldn't be going to these lengths to try and help her; regardless of the cause of her lung collapse how she's managing presently is the biggest issue given that airway/breathing are the #1/2 critical issues for life! Any idea approx. what % of lung function she has available to 'live her life'? We both know she can't run around in an oxygen tent for life but as you've stated IF they can coupage / break-up / expectorate some of the mucus in her chest then CAN she get out of the hospital? If they are recommending euthanasia is it possibly because there is such little lung function left that it would be inhumane to do otherwise as she'd be miserable / die acutely off oxygen? docB
Customer: replied 8 years ago.

Hi Doc, I want to be realistic about her prognosis based on facts from a real vet. I don't exactly have much confidence in the shelter. 1) they told me she was a collie- she is a Pointer, 2) they sent her home with me 6 mos old- and said that she was a little lethargic because of Kennel Cough- misdiagnosed - got worse- turned out it was pneumonia- lead to partially collapsed lung after 1 month of her hospitalization and final appropriate diagnosis, 3) they told me that her partially collapsed lung (x-rays showing no change) that she should be euthansized without even running tests or treating her when I brought her in, 4) they explained that that they are just a Non-Profit Shelter and that is the extent of their medical care (giving her antibiotics). If based on the information stated, I would just need to hear it from anyone but them. They told me that she probably wouldn't even make it through the anesthesia to put the oxygen tube in her nose, but she did! I just need to hear it from a more credible source other than this shelter.

 

Wow...she's been through a lot and is certainly a fighter..! I wish I could say this exact scenario is uncommon but that's simply not true: Fact of the matter is MANY dogs from multiple-pet environments (esp. shelters) end up with 'kennel cough' (more accurately tracheobronchitis) of OF THOSE some will 1) resolve spontaneously 2) resolve with appropriate antibiotic Tx 3) worsen to the point of pneumonia the end stage of which is having an atelectatic lung lobe (1 or more lobe devoid of any aeration - they just become solid-mass like tissue vs. soft spongy aerated functional lung tissue). We'll see many cats with this too - a cat can have a lobe go down and show NO clinical signs (can be an incidental finding on an xray).   Dogs on the other hand show more signs when they've lost a lobe (or more). I understand they are a non-profit but I guess what I'm trying to ascertain is that unfortunately the severity of the disease in her chest may be such that it's not a financial decision anymore but a quality of life decision? She needs enough good functional lung tissue to live a normal life....question is can she get it?....would having her at a major medical center and the resources of Bill Gates make any difference?....these are tough Q's indeed....
Customer: replied 8 years ago.
It sounds like the best option for her is for me to put her to sleep. I have been wrestling with this decision all night. I don't want her to suffer and I certainly would not be selfish enough to try to keep her here in this earth without giving her quality of life. Thank you so much!
I empathize with your tough situation; I also applaud you for being able to prioritize her needs first - that is very selfless of you and something we vets wish more people could do when that time comes...
I'm sorry for your loss- docB
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