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Dr. Dave
Dr. Dave, Veterinarian
Category: Cat
Satisfied Customers: 4125
Experience:  21 years small animal general and emergency practice
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Hello, We have a 10 year old cat that I originally put a a

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Hello, We have a 10 year old cat that I originally put a a new higher grade diet from cat chow to solid gold that was suppose to be better. He started having blood in the stool. I we took him to the vet and he said he had gas in his digestive track so he put him on antibiotics and prescription diet l/d. It stopped for two weeks and now the blood in the stool is back. He is also itching. We're not sure what do to please help.----also her vomited today, it was clear.---and the vet said he has elevated liver enzymes.

Hello, and thanks for writing in. Sorry to hear this is going on with Teddy. This can be frustrating, especially without knowing for sure what the underlying problem is. It's good that blood work was done. The elevated liver enzymes can go along with several things, including true liver disease (infection, inflammation, cancer), thyroid disease, among others. I would also recommend additional lab work, possibly sent out to an outside diagnostic lab. Additional blood work may include testing for pancreas problems or inflammatory bowel disease. Sometimes imaging needs to be done, such as X-rays or ultrasound to look at the size and shape of the digestive tract or abdominal organs to check for things such as inflammation, growths, thickening of bowel loops, or tumors. Lastly, biopsies may be needed of the digestive tract or digestive organs (i.e. pancreas, liver, stomach, intestines), since this is the only way to get a specific diagnosis sometimes. I'm not saying you need to do all of these tests, but any additional test results can be helpful, even if they are normal (as they help to rule out specific problems, and help to narrow down the diagnosis).
Antibiotics and Hill's l/d food are fine, but further treatment may be needed, depending on the additional diagnostic test results. If the additional tests are not possible for you to do, you can also try a few things, such as a product called Denamarin, which helps to protect the liver. You can see an example of Denamarin here:

http://www.nutramaxlabs.com/cat/cat-liver-health/denamarin-for-cats

Sometimes more aggressive treatment is needed, such as IV fluids, and prednisone (to cut down on inflammation in the liver, pancreas, or intestines). By the way, predinsone would also help with itching.

I hope this helps. Please let me know if I can assist you and Teddy further.
Dr. Dave

Customer: replied 4 years ago.

When he was on Cat chow he was better, would going back to that help? Also Teddy has the same energy as ever and is still very lively.

 

Could liver disease be from switching foods because this just started with the food switch?

Thanks for your reply. Liver disease would not occur from switching foods. Elevated liver enzymes don't necessarily indicate liver "disease", it just indicates the liver is "upset", which could be due to simple inflammation or infection. But, it's also possible that something more serious may be going on - that's where additional tests would tell you and your veterinarian more information to base further treatment on.
Sometimes we see changing foods can lead to digestive upset (vomiting, diarrhea), but should not cause liver problems. So, while changing foods might possibly change any vomiting or diarrhea, it should not change any liver changes.
Great to hear that Teddy is still energetic and lively - this typically indicates that the underlying problem is not too serious.

Dr. Dave
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

So would switching back to his original food help? Also his poop is normal consistency just with blood.

Unfortunately, we don't know if switching back to his original food would help - it would be a "trial and error" situation. To find out if it would help, you would need to switch back to the original food, and if the symptoms improve, then the original food may help. But, if the symptoms don't improve, then the original food would not help.

Dr. Dave
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

Our concern is having elevated enzymes for these weeks mean that his liver can get seriously damaged? I'm worried that his liver might get seriously damaged in these weeks and might not be reparable.

The blood in the stool indicates a large intestinal problem, such as inflammatory bowel disease, colitis, cancer, intestinal parasites. I know these are a few different possibilities, but blood in the stool can go along with many different things. That's where additional diagnostics can help. But, if that is not possible, then the treatment and "wait and see" is appropriate.

Dr. Dave
I understand your concern about the liver - that is where the additional tests would tell you and your veterinarian more about what exactly is going on in the liver, and what needs to be done to treat it, so you don't need to worry.

Dr. Dave
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

We're going to the vet tomorrow but waiting for the results will take some time and I would like reassurance that his liver won't be irreparably damaged because we didn't go sooner.


 


Also can we switch the food cold turkey, is that recommended?

I understand. Without knowing exactly what is going on with the liver (since many things can cause elevated liver enzymes - priXXXXX XXXXXver disorders, secondary liver disorders, etc.), unfortunately, there is just no way to be able to tell you what is going with the liver at this time, and how things will progress, with or without treatment. I completely understand what you are asking, and I would love to tell you that everything will go perfectly, but no veterinarian would be able to tell you that at this point in time, without the additional diagnostics to tell more specifically what is going on inside Teddy. Overall though, I would highly suspect that you are not dealing with irrepairable liver damage, by waiting until tomorrow to get tests run.
With a change of food, it's best to transition over about 5-7 days, by mixing the two foods together (less of the old food with more of the new food each day).

I hope this is helpful.
Dr. Dave
Dr. Dave and other Cat Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

Thanks for all the help.

You are very welcome - glad to be here to assist you and Teddy.
I hope everything goes great!

Take care,
Dr. Dave
Dr. Dave and other Cat Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

One more question. Is it possible that the original food switch created bacteria in the liver that causes the elevated enzyme. If not how could the food swicth start such a chain reaction?

The food switch would be very unlikely to have cause the problems. It's likely coincidental timing, as the only reason a food could have caused this is if the new food was contaminated, which is not likely.

I hope this is helpful.
Dr. Dave
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

I'm sorry again but how long does the food stay in their system. And how long do antibiotics stay in their system?

On average, food stays in the system 1-2 days (from eating it, to stool passing out). It depends on the antibiotic. Most antibiotics are out of the system within 24 hours. There is an injection of an antibiotic called Convenia, which lasts 2 weeks in the body.

Dr. Dave
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

If we were to switch to the original food that worked. How long would it take to get results with just the food switch?

IF it were to work, it may take anywhere from 2 days toXXXXX Dave

Customer: replied 4 years ago.

Also I completely forgot that the doctor took xrays and and found gas from bacteria.

Good to know - that is very common with digestive upset.

Dr. Dave
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

an that fuel out anything or is your recommendation still stand?

It still stands. Gas on X-rays is VERY common, whether bacteria are present or not, but it's more common with bacteria.

I hope this helps.
Dr. Dave