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August Abbott, CAS
August Abbott, CAS, Certified Avian Specialist
Category: Bird
Satisfied Customers: 7608
Experience:  Cert. Avian Specialist; Int. Assoc.Animal Behavior Consult; Pet Ind. Joint Advisory Council; author
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I have had my umbrella cockatoo for about 10 years, me and

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I have had my umbrella cockatoo for about 10 years, me and my mom got him from the pet store when he was 6 months old. And I've noticed that since we've got him he has the tendency to break the feathers off his chest and sometimes will work his up around where his wings will expand. I've also noticed since he's become mature enough to start breeding he's been regurgitating. My mom told me its something they do to practice feeding their babies. But he does it a lot. And does it almost Everytime I feed him something. Even if its fruit. He isn't different from when he got him, he eats regularly, drinks his water when he's thirsty. Is there anything I should be concerned about him?
-- What good observations you have. You might just have caught something serious early enough to get a simple treatment whereas if it went on any longer it could have turned life threatening and really expensive to treat.
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Let's go over a few things first. All birds regurgitate at some time or another in their lives. They do it for their chicks in order to feed them; they do it for each other when they are 'in love'; they do it for a sick bird that they are bonded to; they do it when they're nervous over something only they know; they do it for their beloved human (which you obviously are to Sam) and they even do it to objects like bells, toys, mirrors, shoes, toes, fingers, hats, and too many other things to mention.

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Now, another reason they might be doing it is an infection. This is why you need to pursue a vet visit. Too many times I've seen simple infections that could be treated with a 10 day course of medication end up going blood borne and once we get to that point the outcomes are not very good.

So you likely saved Sam's life with your observations and by trusting your instincts with knowing something's not right.

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Though specialized avian vets are ideal, any vet who sees a majority of birds or at least 1/3 of their practice consisting of birds is a good choice.
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If you have a Pet Smart, you have Banfield Clinic inside, open 7 days a week and they see birds.
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If you have a Pet Co, they have a list of vet names that they use for themselves and are happy to give you, ask for 'bird vets'.
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Ask any vet in town who they'd recommend for bird care. Ask any good breeder in town who they use (if they don't use anyone, they are not a good breeder, stay away from them).
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Find an avian vet near you
--- http://aav.org/search
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Offer ½ spoon of all natural, organic baby food (squash, yams, sweet potatoes, mixed vegetables) which many birds take readily; also try some pabulum or baby rice cereal and a few licks of natural (no artificial anything) yogurt.
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Make an oatmeal using 2 tablespoons of all natural oats + 4 tablespoons of plain, hot tap water. Let it stand for about 5 or 10 minutes until the water is mostly absorbed. You can add ½ teaspoon of no sugar added, all natural applesauce, either regular or jarred baby food type, which often makes the oatmeal more acceptable for picky eaters.
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Chop up some fresh or dried fruits to add. With dried fruits try to find ‘no sulfites’ on the packaging.

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Customer: replied 4 years ago.

ok i just have one more question about it.


 


We've been going through renovations for quite sometime now. do you think that could play a little bit of a role with his regurgitating and feather breaking?


 


the other thing i forgot to mention about the regurgitation was that he seems to do it in spurts.. like for a little bit he'll do it a lot, and then he wont do it very much at all. and thats been with and without renovations.


 


mom thinks that they could have something to do with it because he could be stressed out with all the changes going on and having his cage moved around a lot.

-- Mom is right about that, BUT I'd think twice about taking a 'watch and wait' position when it comes to birds.

Here's a terrible story that's not just true, but very recent. One of my clients had a macaw that was acting 'off'. Nothing specific, but sometimes it wouldn't eat; other times it had watery droppings; it seemed sullen or bored a lot. Just a few things here and there, you know?

I told the owners that if they continued to 'watch and wait' what they could end up doing is watching their companion suffer and diminish; waiting for it to die.

They still didn't go to the vet. One month, two months passed. Then one night the bird was making strange 'sad' noises and the man picked him up. He noticed that the bird felt cold. At that point he couldn't find a vet open anywhere. His bird passed away in his arms and broke the guy's heart.

The worst, worst part? A simple medication when it all first started would have cleared up the infection in about 10 days and the bird would be here today

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So even though your mom is right and it could be stress from new furniture and other changes - it might be something else that only a vet exam can find

Customer: replied 4 years ago.

that's so sad!!!


 


well thank you for your help. ill definitely see if i can find someone in town to take a look at sam. last time i asked around i would have had to leave town. but im gunna call around everywhere this time.


I know it's sad. The poor guy blames himself every day.

--
Though specialized avian vets are ideal, any vet who sees a majority of birds or at least 1/3 of their practice consisting of birds is a good choice.
---
If you have a Pet Smart, you have Banfield Clinic inside, open 7 days a week and they see birds.
---
If you have a Pet Co, they have a list of vet names that they use for themselves and are happy to give you, ask for 'bird vets'.
---
Ask any vet in town who they'd recommend for bird care. Ask any good breeder in town who they use (if they don't use anyone, they are not a good breeder, stay away from them).
---
Find an avian vet near you
--- http://aav.org/search
August Abbott, CAS and other Bird Specialists are ready to help you