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jennem22
jennem22, Appraiser
Category: Musical Instrument Appraisal
Satisfied Customers: 2547
Experience:  Certified with Appraisers Association of America, USPAP qualified through 2015, 20 years full-time professional experience.
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Italian Sano Stereo Twenty amplified (no amp) Accordion,

Customer Question

Italian Sano Stereo Twenty amplified (no amp) Accordion, circa 1964'ish, perfect condition, plays well, always stored in it's original case in a controlled environment, non-smoker, no pets home. Close to mint condition with only a few faint blemishes. There are two YouTubes of it being played if that helps an analysis:
youtube.com/watch?v=jQvFuhjwnqQ
youtube.com/watch?v=z4uVn_AEevM
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Musical Instrument Appraisal
Expert:  jennem22 replied 1 year ago.

Hi, my name is*****'m a certified appraiser and I"d be happy to help.

On a resale level, typically an owner could expect to get $1,200.00 - $1,300.00 for this accordion.

A dealer at retail would charge closer to $2,000.00 - $2,500.00, after fully reconditioning the piece.

Please let me know if I can help further.

Sincerely,

Jennifer

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I have had it on eBay for $1300 for about 3 weeks - over 500 views, 9 watchers - no takers. On Craig's List one guy came by and played it (did you watch the youtube's?) and he has played accordions since he was a child - 40 years - he can play and he said it sounded great but he could not afford it - fishing for a lower price but never made an offer and I suspect he would buy it if it were under $1000.There is some difference between dual chambers I think they call it and certain types of reeds, as well as markings on the inside. One person who sells them about 30 miles away, I've yet to take it to him to assess, said it could be worth as much as $5000-6000 if some of those criteria were present. Do you know anything about that type of stuff? (NOTE: this is my wife's - she played it for a few years as a child - it is in truly pristine condition, with few blemishes and no damage, sounds incredible actually, but she knows little about it other than it was hers as a child.)
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Do you have any credentials or offer a written value (subject to the usual disclaimers since you have not actually seen it in person?)
Expert:  jennem22 replied 1 year ago.

The problem with many dealers and experts saying what something is "worth," is that it might be quite difficult to find that person who will pay that price!

Prices are always dependent on location. With smaller objects, that are more portable, it's easier to sell. In your case, when a buyer would likely want to try it in person, you have a limited market. I do feel that $1300 is achievable generally in the US, but you may not have a broad enough market in your area. Also, people don't necessarily go to eBay to look for an accordion. An instrument-specific site, or giving it to a dealer to sell on consignment, might get you a better price.

Yes, I have the credentials to offer a written appraisal by email, complete with my curriculum vitae etc., but for that I would need to see photos and JustAnswer would charge an additional fee.

Jennifer

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Were you able to view the YouTube videos I sent? Any assessment you can make based on the sound quality? I know that is not the optimal way to listen to an instrument but was curious of your opinion.
Expert:  jennem22 replied 1 year ago.

Unfortunately, watching YouTube via my computer's speakers doesn't let me hear anything clearly enough to comment on sound quality!

Jennifer

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
While I can understand the optimal tonal quality may be difficult to discern over the Internet, it does give you some clues about how the instrument does sound in general and that it is in fact in good condition. Kind of disappointing you won't take time to at least make the effort to listen to the short videos.