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Doug
Doug, ASE Certified Technician
Category: Mitsubishi
Satisfied Customers: 8594
Experience:  Mitsubishi employed and Factory trained ASE certified technician
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Have a 2004 endeavor that,s been having problems with

Customer Question

Have a 2004 endeavor that,s been having problems with neautral saftey sensor ,placed it the neautral light inside was flashing driving causing a lost of power while driving. Replaced the neautral safety sensor stop flashing for a little bit. But started flashing again. Someone said replace the Torque converter clutch do think that is the problem.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Mitsubishi
Expert:  Doug replied 1 year ago.

Hi,

You need to get the transmission controller scanned to see what fault is being set in order to get to the bottom of this. This is different from an OBD scan that checks for engine faults... while that may tell you something, a transmission-specific scanner is required to read the transmission faults.

The reason this is required is because of the N light behavior. While on most cars you would be right on track checking the safety switch over this, on Mitsubishis this light has Mitsubishi-specific purposes, in that it is used as a warning light for transmission operation problems. To be precise, when it flashes at ~2Hz it indicates a temperature problem (be it over heating or sensor failure) and when it flashes at 1Hz it is indicating a trouble code is stored, sort of like how the Service Engine light indicates engine related faults. This can come on for something as minor as a fluid level or sensor problem or as major as a mechanical ratio problem.

With dozens of potential causes to set a code for the light to flash, you have to get the system scanned to see what is going on.... it would not be cost effective to take a random guess approach, never mind the very sensitive nature of Mitsubishi computers when it comes to foreign sensors etc. Best to get the code scanned to see what fault is set in the transmission controller and proceed with diagnosis from there before any more unnecessary parts are purchased.

Expert:  Doug replied 1 year ago.

Hi,

You need to get the transmission controller scanned to see what fault is being set in order to get to the bottom of this. This is different from an OBD scan that checks for engine faults... while that may tell you something, a transmission-specific scanner is required to read the transmission faults.

The reason this is required is because of the N light behavior. While on most cars you would be right on track checking the safety switch over this, on Mitsubishis this light has Mitsubishi-specific purposes, in that it is used as a warning light for transmission operation problems. To be precise, when it flashes at ~2Hz it indicates a temperature problem (be it over heating or sensor failure) and when it flashes at 1Hz it is indicating a trouble code is stored, sort of like how the Service Engine light indicates engine related faults. This can come on for something as minor as a fluid level or sensor problem or as major as a mechanical ratio problem.

With dozens of potential causes to set a code for the light to flash, you have to get the system scanned to see what is going on.... it would not be cost effective to take a random guess approach, never mind the very sensitive nature of Mitsubishi computers when it comes to foreign sensors etc. Best to get the code scanned to see what fault is set in the transmission controller and proceed with diagnosis from there before any more unnecessary parts are purchased.