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TherapistMarryAnn
TherapistMarryAnn, Therapist
Category: Mental Health
Satisfied Customers: 5839
Experience:  Over 20 years experience specializing in anxiety, depression, drug and alcohol, and relationship issues.
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Kate. I am still struggling to get a full diagnosis from the

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Kate. I am still struggling to get a full diagnosis from the psychiatrist. She took me off antidepressants in July because my head was 'buzzing'. I have had one more episode like that since being off them. Last week I was given antidepressants again as my mood is rock bottom but today I feel very agitated and I feel like I am losing control of my head.
Is it likely that this is linked to starting the meds again or could it just be coincidence?
I am due to go see the manager of my mental health team next Tuesday and this is causing me enormous anxiety, as I am complaining about something that my initial CPN disclosed to me.
Is it possible that this anxiety is causing my head to 'buzz'?
Sue

Hi Sue, it's good to talk with you again.

Yes, it is very possible that the buzzing you are experiencing is caused by anxiety. A sensation of buzzing is a common symptom with anxiety. Because anxiety is a "nerve" related disorder, sensations like buzzing are common. Many people describe buzzing in their heads, electric sensations such as zapping, shocks, and prickling sensations throughout the body.

You will not lose control in your head. That is also part of anxiety. The feeling that you will lose it or not be able to stop a symptom or even your own behavior is part of what keeps anxiety going. You think these thoughts then your body reacts by releasing adrenaline which in turn creates these odd and disturbing sensations. It keeps going, creating a cycle that is hard to stop.

Although medications can have bad side effects, buzzing it usually not one of them. Therefore, this is most likely an anxiety reaction. The key to coping with it is to realize that it will not hurt you. As long as your doctor has cleared you for any possible physical issue, you can learn to dismiss this sensation, reacting to it by relaxing and telling yourself that it will not harm you. As you do this, you will retrain your thinking process. Right now, you are tensing when you feel it and might even be alarmed when you feel it. But changing your thoughts by realizing it's just a bodily reaction to anxiety and it will not hurt you can minimize it or even make it go away.

Kate

Customer: replied 5 years ago.

Thanks Kate.

My anxiety and stress levels are ridiculously high at the moment and having Christmas just 10 days away is not helping.

My doctor saw me last week as I was coming out in a rash and she thinks it is stress related. She has told me to reduce my stress levels but it's never that easy. Any suggestions on how I can reduce them please?

I am finding it hard to slow down right now ... I feel like I am running away from something dark that's chasing me ... I am scared to stop in case it completely consumes me. Unless I can stop keeping myself so busy during every waking hour I don't see how my stress levels will reduce.

I am trying group therapy to help with my personality disorder (how I HATE that label) but I am not settling into it too easily. I have real issues with trust so talking in front of strangers was never going to be straightforward for me.

I will TRY anything to reduce my anxiety but am running out of ideas.

Any suggestions will be gratefully received.

Sue

Yes,you can learn to relax and help yourself feel better.

One of the best ways to relax is to change your thought patterns. Pick out three positive thoughts to counter your worst negative thoughts. Write down the positive thoughts. Each morning, read the positive thoughts. Keep them with you and read them whenever you feel overwhelmed during the day. As you notice additional negative thoughts, write down a positive thought in response. As you memorize your positive thoughts, repeat them as often as you need to whenever you feel anxious.

Another great technique to help you cope with stress is called progressive muscle relaxation. It is a popular proven technique used in anxiety treatment. Here is how you do it:

Lie on your back, close your eyes.

Feel your feet. Sense their weight. Consciously relax them and sink into the bed. Start with your toes and progress to your ankles.

Feel your knees. Sense their weight. Consciously relax them and feel them sink into the bed.

Feel your upper legs and thighs. Feel their weight. Consciously relax them and feel them sink into the bed.

Feel your abdomen and chest. Sense your breathing. Consciously will them to relax. Deepen your breathing slightly and feel your abdomen and chest sink into the bed.

Feel your buttocks. Sense their weight. Consciously relax them and feel them sink into the bed.

Feel your hands. Sense their weight. Consciously relax them and feel them sink into the bed.

Feel your upper arms. Sense their weight. Consciously relax them and feel them sink into the bed.

Feel your shoulders. Sense their weight. Consciously relax them and feel them sink into the bed.

Feel your neck. Sense its weight. Consciously relax it and feel it sink into the bed.

Feel your head and skull. Sense its weight. Consciously relax it and feel it sink into the bed.

Feel your mouth and jaw. Consciously relax them. Pay particular attention to your jaw muscles and unclench them if you need to. Feel your mouth and jaw relax and sink into the bed.

Feel your eyes. Sense if there is tension in your eyes. Sense if you are forcibly closing your eyelids. Consciously relax your eyelids and feel the tension slide off the eyes.

Feel your face and cheeks. Consciously relax them and feel the tension slide off into the bed.

Mentally scan your body. If you find any place that is still tense, then consciously relax that place and let it sink into the bed.

Practice this technique every night. It helps you gain control over your muscle tension and teaches you how to relax. When you begin to feel anxious during the day, recall this technique and use it to help you gain control over your anxiety.

If you do not find your group therapy helpful, you may want to try support groups on line. That would provide you with support and help you learn more about anxiety from others.

Kate

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