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Roger
Roger, Attorney
Category: Legal
Satisfied Customers: 31770
Experience:  BV Rated by Martindale-Hubbell; SuperLawyer rating by Thompson-Reuters
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I own a live theater and have a guest who is requesting a

Customer Question

Hello. I own a live theater and have a guest who is requesting a sign language interpreter for one of our performances. I want to make certain I am following the law in California about when this has to be provided. I know that Broadway houses in New York generally provide one night each year or during the run of a show where they have an interpreter. I offer the same but this guest is not available on the night we are offering. I don't want to run the risk of a lawsuit if I am not providing a service when needed. My thought was to offer the guest a copy of the script as accommodation. Any clarification on this is appreciated!
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Legal
Expert:  Roger replied 1 year ago.

Hi - my name is ***** ***** I'll be glad to assist.

Expert:  Roger replied 1 year ago.

A theater is considered a "public accommodation", so the ADA would apply......however, that doesn't mean sign language interpreters are mandatory.

Expert:  Roger replied 1 year ago.

Thus, federal law would require the theater to try and make an accommodation.....but there's no requirement to make an accommodation that is unreasonable or to do something that takes away from the integrity of the performance. Here's a good link you can read: http://firemark.com/2011/02/14/your-theatre-or-production-danger-of-ada-lawsuit/

Expert:  Roger replied 1 year ago.

Thus, if you can provide a script or some type of aid to the person, then it is possible that you could claim that this is a reasonable accommodation and that it is adequate as anything else would destroy the integrity of the performance.