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barristerinky
barristerinky, Attorney
Category: Landlord-Tenant
Satisfied Customers: 37380
Experience:  Attorney over 16 years, landlord 26 years
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Even though there is a very vague "lease" in place, is there

Customer Question

Even though there is a very vague "lease" in place, is there ever a time when a landlord can ask for increased rent due to unforeseen and extreme hardship conditions?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Landlord-Tenant
Expert:  barristerinky replied 1 year ago.

Hello and welcome! My name is ***** ***** I will try my level best to help with your situation or get you to someone who can.

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Is there any written fixed term lease in place or is this month to month?

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Can you tell me what state this is in?

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thanks

Barrister

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
in Pennsylvania. "Lease" was written to help a non-profit and was made for $1.00 per year for 99 years. Organization always paid the utilities and prop. taxes for almost 20 yrs. then a new board came in, kicked me out, and demanded that I now pay all of prop. taxes and utilities yet refuse to raise that $1.00 per year rent. I am now 66, on Social Security---can't do all of that. I wanted to leave a legacy and a future for the group, but now it seems my own future is in jeopardy because of that. No where in the lease does it address if and when a rent increase could occur. A lot of other things also not addressed----it was never intended to be a real lease anyway.
Expert:  barristerinky replied 1 year ago.

Ok, if you have a 99 year lease at $1 a year, then it can't legally be increased for that term. The only way a landlord could do so is if the tenant breaches the lease somehow and then they terminate, evict, and re-lease to someone else.

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But if there is nothing in the lease that makes the tenant responsible for the property taxes and utilities, then if the landlord was paying them initially, then they have to continue to do so and this is probably the worst lease for the landlord ever..

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thanks

Barrister

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