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Pete
Pete, Technician
Category: Jeep
Satisfied Customers: 28274
Experience:  Over 17 years diagnosing and repairing automobiles various makes and models with some training and certifications.
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I'm popping two codes P0369 camshaft position sensor

Customer Question

Hey guys I'm popping two codes P0369 camshaft position sensor intermittent-bank 1 sensor 2, and P2638 torque management feedback signal performance. I replaced the camshaft sensor on the panels enter side, is there more than one? Could the torque one just be from the jeep going to limp mode after the camshaft code?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Jeep
Expert:  Pete replied 1 year ago.

My name is ***** ***** I am a professional here at Just Answer. I noticed that your question had not received a response and thought I would see if you still need help with this.I apologize for the delay and I hope I can still assist you with this here.

The torque fault is most likely related to the cam sensor code issue here.I have seen the torque code set before due to the cam sensor code issue or other engine code issues.I would focus on repairing the cam sensor code.

There are four cam sensors on this engine here.This code sets for a fault with the cam sensor on the drivers side of the engine towards the intake and not the one towards the exhaust manifold.Make sure the correct sensor was replaced.If it wasnt then the correct sensor needs replaced.If it was have the cam sensor wiring checked for any issues with the wiring needing repaired.

If more help is needed, use the reply tab to continue our conversation. If no further assistance is needed, kindly rate my service.You can rate at any time and we can continue to work on your question as this will not close out your question.Keep in mind in some cases it can be difficult to fully diagnose or help repair your vehicle without seeing it and I work on delivering the best possible answer from what I see to work with.

Thanks Pete

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I can only the two sensors on the rear of the motor. Where would the other two be?
Expert:  Pete replied 1 year ago.

There should be two on each side/cylinder head at the rear of the motor.The one your looking for is on the drivers side closest to the center of the engine and may be hard to see or reach.I would check again and see if this sensor is there.If it isnt let me know.

Let me know if you need anything else and feel free to rate my help.

Thanks Pete

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I can't seem to find it I definitely see one on each side in the back of the valve cover. I don't see any other ones.
Expert:  Pete replied 1 year ago.

O.k.,double checked my info and part of it says two sensors on each side and the other says one sensor.This engine (after doing more research) only has one sensor on each side and if you already replaced the drivers side sensor then the sensor isnt the cause here.The next step is to check for any wiring damage leading to this sensor to see if any wiring faults are found.I may be able to locate the diagnostic flow chart for you to follow on this code if the wiring is found to be o.k. as it will lead to the fault but this will require a multi meter to test with and a scan tool that displays engine data.

Thanks Pete

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
If possible can you get the diagnostic flow chart that would be greatly appreciated.
Expert:  Pete replied 1 year ago.

No problem.Below is the info on the diagnostic flow chart for this code here for the cam sensor issue.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/9pxbknl6zkyyfbl/s-12-07.gif?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/szjywwwk2r9v2bo/sc-12-07.gif?dl=0

Theory of Operation

https://www.dropbox.com/s/0vpigye9e4eaoxp/sdc-12-07.gif?dl=0

NOTE: The CMP Sensor is a dual read sensor reading both camshafts of it's correlating bank.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/qz8qsxa5ctwivvl/erd-12-07.gif?dl=0

Variable Valve Timing (VVT) allows the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) to monitor and adjust the position of each Camshaft, based on desired torque levels and engine operating conditions. The PCM controls solenoid operated control valves located on the front of the engine. There is one solenoid for each Camshaft, used to direct oil pressure to hydraulic actuators mounted between each Camshaft and its driving sprocket. The oil pressure alters the angular position or phasing of each Camshaft relative to Crankshaft rotation. A sensor is used to monitor the position of each Camshaft. There are four separate Camshafts that the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) requires positional information from. There are two Camshaft Position (CMP) Sensors with each CMP Sensor consisting of four circuits. The sensors are located at the top rear of each valve cover. On the end of each Camshaft is a magnetic encoder that is programmed with a magnetic pattern. The PCM provides a 5-Volt supply and a sensor ground circuit to the CMP Sensor and the CMP Sensor provides two Camshaft positional signals, the intake and exhaust camshaft position, to the PCM. The sensor detects the magnetically encoded information, a series of magnetic peaks and valleys, from the encoder. As each Camshaft rotates, the magnetic encoded pattern passes by the CMP Sensor creating a changing magnetic field at the sensor face. The changing magnetic field is interpreted by the sensor electronics and a digital output, ON/OFF or HIGH/LOW pattern, is produced. The length of the pulse width generated by the CMP varies in size based on the velocity of the Camshaft. The PCM decodes the digital pattern to identify the Camshaft position. The information from each individual Camshaft along with the Crankshaft information is used to control and sequence the Variable Valve Timing (VVT) system and fuel injection events. - When Monitored: While cranking the engine and engine running. - Set Condition: When the failure counter reaches 20. One Trip Fault. Three good trips to turn off the MIL. If the vehicle is equipped with the stop/start feature, the system will be disabled when this DTC is active.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/4jd1hql6gumguih/etg-12-07.gif?dl=0

Diagnostic Test 1. ACTIVE DTC NOTE: Diagnose and repair any 5-Volt Reference DTCs that are present before continuing with this test procedure. NOTE: Diagnose and repair any Dual Stage Oil Pump or Oil Pressure related DTCs that are present before continuing with this test procedure. NOTE: Diagnose & Repair any VVT related issues or faults before continuing with this test procedure. Anything that affects the engines VVT system may cause a CMP Sensor DTC to set. Verify that there are no engine mechanical issues that may be causing the fault to set such as but not limited to the timing chain, camshafts and sprockets, camshaft phasers, oil quality, level or oil pressure issues. 1. Turn the ignition on. 2. With the scan tool, read DTCs. Copy DTC and Freeze Frame information. 3. Start the engine and allow it to idle or crank the engine if it will not start. Attempt to operate vehicle under conditions similar to freeze frame data WARNING: When the engine is operating, do not stand in direct line with the fan. Do not put your hands near the pulleys, belts or fan. Do not wear loose clothing. Failure to follow these instructions may result in possible serious or fatal injury. 4. With the scan tool, read the active DTCs. Is the DTC Active at this time? Yes - Go To 2 No - Go To 11 2. OTHER CAM SENSOR DTCS ACTIVE Is the P0340 or P0344 DTC also active at this time? Yes - Go To 3 No - Go To 6 3. CHECK THE (F856) 5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT 1. Turn the ignition off. 2. Disconnect the CMP Sensor harness connector. 3. Ignition on, engine not running. 4. Measure the voltage on the (F856) 5-Volt Supply circuit in the CMP Sensor harness connector. Is the voltage between 4.8 and 5.2 volts? Yes - Go To 4 No - Repair the (F856) 5-Volt Supply circuit for an open or high resistance.

4. CHECK THE (K900) SENSOR GROUND CIRCUIT FOR AN OPEN OR HIGH RESISTANCE 1. Turn the ignition off. 2. Disconnect the PCM C2 harness connector. CAUTION: Do not probe the PCM harness connectors. Probing the PCM harness connectors will damage the PCM terminals resulting in poor terminal to pin connection. Install the GPEC Diagnostic Adaptor to perform the diagnosis. 3. Connect the (10436). 4. Measure the resistance of the (K900) Sensor ground circuit from the CMP Sensor harness connector to the GPEC Adaptor. Is the resistance below 5.0 Ohms? Yes - Go To 5 No - Repair the (K900) Sensor ground circuit for an open or high resistance.

5. CAMSHAFT POSITION SENSOR 1. Remove and exchange the CMP Sensor with the CMP Sensor on the opposite bank. NOTE: Inspect the Camshaft magnetic target for damage. If a problem is found repair as necessary. 2. Reconnect the PCM C2 and Cam Sensor harness connectors. 3. Turn the ignition on, 4. With the scan tool, erase DTCs. 5. Start the engine and allow it to idle or crank the engine if it will not start. Attempt to operate vehicle under conditions similar to freeze frame data 6. With the scan tool, read DTCs. Did the CMP Sensor DTCs for the opposite bank set as active? Yes - Replace the Camshaft Position Sensor.

No - Go To 10 6. CHECK THE (K441) CMP SENSOR SIGNAL 1/2 CIRCUIT FOR A SHORT TO VOLTAGE 1. Disconnect the CMP Sensor harness connector. 2. Measure the voltage on the (K441) CMP Sensor Signal 1/2 circuit in the CMP Sensor harness connector. Is the voltage above 5.2 volts? Yes - Repair the (K441) CMP Sensor Signal 1/2 circuit for a short to voltage.

No - Go To 7 7. CHECK THE (K441) CMP SENSOR SIGNAL 1/2 CIRCUIT FOR A SHORT TO GROUND 1. Turn the ignition off. 2. Disconnect the PCM C2 harness connector. 3. Measure the resistance between ground and the (K441) CMP Sensor Signal 1/2 circuit at the CMP Sensor harness connector. Is the resistance above 10k Ohms? Yes - Go To 8 No - Repair the short to ground in the (K441) CMP Sensor Signal 1/2 circuit.

8. CHECK THE (K441) CMP SENSOR SIGNAL 1/2 CIRCUIT FOR AN OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE CAUTION: Do not probe the PCM harness connectors. Probing the PCM harness connectors will damage the PCM terminals resulting in poor terminal to pin connection. Install the GPEC Diagnostic Adaptor to perform the diagnosis. 1. Connect the (10436). 2. Measure the resistance of the (K441) CMP Sensor Signal 1/2 circuit between the CMP Sensor harness connector and the GPEC Adaptor. Is the resistance below 5.0 Ohms? Yes - Go To 9 No - Repair the (K441) CMP Sensor Signal 1/2 circuit for an open or high resistance.

9. CAMSHAFT POSITION SENSOR 1. Remove and exchange the CMP Sensor with the CMP Sensor on the opposite bank. NOTE: Inspect the Camshaft sprocket for damage. If a problem is found repair as necessary. 2. Reconnect the PCM C2 and Cam Sensor harness connectors. 3. Turn the ignition on, 4. With the scan tool, erase DTCs. 5. Start the engine and allow it to idle or crank the engine if it will not start. 6. With the scan tool, read DTCs. Did the CMP Sensor DTCs for the opposite bank set as active? Yes - Replace the faulty Camshaft Position Sensor.

No - Go To 10 10. POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM) 1. Perform any Technical Service Bulletins that may apply. 2. Anything that affects the engines VVT system may cause a CMP Sensor DTC to set. Before replacing the PCM, verify that there are no engine mechanical issues that may be causing the fault to set such as but not limited to the timing chain, camshafts and sprockets, camshaft phasers, oil quality, level or oil pressure issues. 3. Using the wiring diagram/schematic as a guide, inspect the wiring and connectors between the related Sensor and the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). 4. Look for any chafed, pierced, pinched or partially broken wires. 5. Look for broken, bent, pushed out or corroded terminals. Verify that there is good pin to terminal contact in the related Sensor and the Powertrain Control Module connectors. Were there any issues? Yes - Repair as necessary.

No - Replace and program the Powertrain Control Module.

11. WIRE HARNESS/CKP SENSOR INSPECTION 1. Turn the ignition off. 2. Disconnect the harness connectors at the PCM and Cam Sensor and inspect for wire chaffing or rub conditions, terminals pushed out on the wiring connector, bent terminals at the PCM and Crank Sensor, water in the connector cavities, presence of corrosion on the terminals of the connectors or components. 3. Visually inspect the mounting area of Cam Sensor for debris/damage or a loose sensor. Remove the Cam Sensor and inspect the end of the sensor for signs of damage or debris. Rotate the engine and if possible, inspect the target wheel for any signs of damage. Reinstall the Cam Sensor and ensure that the sensor is properly installed and torqued to proper specification. NOTE: Due to the fact that this DTC is set by an intermittent loss of the signal, the most likely cause is a poor connection at the Cam Sensor or PCM terminals, or a poor signal between the Cam Sensor and target wheel. Because of this, unplugging and reconnecting the harness connectors, or repositioning the Cam Sensor will often repair the condition that set the DTC. Were any problems found? Yes - Perform the appropriate repair.

No - Go To 12 12. CHECK THE VEHICLE'S REPAIR HISTORY 1. Check the history of the vehicle for previous Cam Sensor related DTCs within the past 90 days. Did the repair history show that the vehicle was in dealership for a Cam Sensor fault within the past 90 days? Yes - Replace the Cam Sensor.

Its a long procedure of testing and checking but if you follow it,it will lead to the cause needing repaired.

Thanks Pete