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hvacdave84
hvacdave84, HVAC Technician
Category: HVAC
Satisfied Customers: 100
Experience:  ARI and EPA certified
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I have a HZ311 that has worked fine for 4 years. I have 3

Customer Question

I have a HZ311 that has worked fine for 4 years. I have 3 zones. it seems like every time zone 2 or 3 goes on zone 1 goes on even though the zone 1 theromstat is not calling for
JA: Just to clarify, do you think this is a larger HVAC problem, or something specific to the thermostat?
Customer: heat.
JA: Do you plan on doing the work yourself?
Customer: maybe.
JA: Anything else we should know to help you best?
Customer: can not think of any thing.
Submitted: 8 months ago.
Category: HVAC
Expert:  hvacdave84 replied 8 months ago.
Hello. There are zone dampers in the ductwork, controlled by small electric motors. When there is no call at the thermostat, the damper is closed. When the thermostat for that zone calls, the damper opens. It sounds like your damper may be mechanically stuck in the open position. This would give the impression that, when there is only a call for that zone, that zone is working fine because there is no blockage when that thermostat is calling and the other 2 zones are closed as they should be. But when a different zone calls and that zone isn’t calling, heat (or cooling) would be allowed to travel through the ductwork to that zone inadvertently. One other cause could be that the relay that sends voltage to the damper motor to open it is stuck. That would be on the zone control module. In either case, parts will be needed to correct the issue. If you’re comfortable doing this yourself, you can order what is needed. If you aren’t completely comfortable troubleshooting and working with electricity and sheet metal, it may be necessary to call your HVAC service technician.