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David Scrafton
David Scrafton, Graduate Student
Category: Homework
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Experience:  BSc(Hons) - 1st class honours in Chemistry, MPhil (Chemistry), MBBS (Medicine)
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Write atomic diagram for 10 atoms and then diagrams for the

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Write atomic diagram for 10 atoms and then diagrams for the ions that they might produce. Lithium, Hydrogen

Hi, I'd be happy to do this for you,

 

I can draw them out and scan in the image if you would like? Would you like me to draw H, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F, Na, Mg and the ions they make?

 

Many thanks,

 

David.

Customer: replied 8 years ago.
Yes that sounds good, I am so confuse with this I am about to dropout but I decide to give it another try.

Ok, give me 5 mins and I'll have the first five you asked for drawn. Let me know if they're ok.

 

David.

Customer: replied 8 years ago.
ok

Ok, I've done the first four. I'll attach as a picture below. Let me know if they're ok and I'll continue with the rest.

 

graphic

Customer: replied 8 years ago.

This is good but she wants it written out here is an example of the way she wants it

 

 

Chlorine cl has 17 atoms she came up with an answer like this

 

Cl)2e )8e )7e- ]+1=Cl-1 using these number 2 8 8- 18

Ok, so for the first four:

 

H) 1e will go to H) 0e ]+1

Li) 2e) 1e will go to Li) 2e ]+1

Mg) 2e) 8e) 2e) will go to Mg) 2e) 8e ]+2

F) 2e) 7e will go to F) 2e) 8e]-1

 

Is that how you need it?

Customer: replied 8 years ago.

Yes, Can you become my personal tutor.

 

I'd be happy to. I'll just do the remainder and send them over. If you have any question about how I did them let me know.
Customer: replied 8 years ago.

yes I do have question about them Can you show me step by step how you got the answer

 

Ok,

 

B) 2e) 3e ---- B) 2e]3+

Be) 2e)2e ---- Be) 2e]2+

N) 2e)5e ----- N) 2e) 8e]3+

Cl) 2e)8e)7e ---- Cl) 2e) 8e) 8e]1-

Ne) 2e) 8e ---- already has full outer shell and so won't form an ion

 

Next one is a funny one, as it doesn't usually form an ion. It can either form a 4+ ion or a 4- ion:

 

Si) 2e) 8e) 4e ---- Si) 2e) 8e) 8e]4-

Si) 2e) 8e) 4e ---- Si) 2e) 8e]4+

 

Quite difficult to form either of these ions though!

 

Hope that they're in the right format for your teacher. Are you ok with how to do them?

 

If you look at the sheet I sent you it shows you what is happening in each case. Your outer shells need to have 8 electrons in them (unless its the first shell which is 2 electrons) when you form a stable ion. So you either add or take electrons away - whichever is easiest. If it is closer to 8 than 0 then you add electrons to it, if it is closer to 0 than 8, take electrons away. You can see why there was a bit of trouble with silicon as it is just as close to 8 as it is to 0.

 

 

Customer: replied 8 years ago.
ok How will I keep you as a tutor

Just saw your other post:

 

Ok, using boron as an example:

 

It has two inner electrons and three outer electrons:

 

So write it as follows: B) 2e) 3e

 

When it forms an ion it is easier to lose 3 electrons than to gain 5, therefore take away the outer three electrons:

 

B) 2e

 

You are left with 2 electrons, but the atom has a charge now, and so we call it an ion. It has lost 3 electrons and so has 3 more protons than electrons now giving it a +3 charge:

 

B) 2e ]3+

 

Therefore I have written the charge after the electron shell arrangement as ]3+

 

Hope this helps, if I have answered your question then you can accept my answer, if you would like to have me as a tutor, then if you have any other chemistry questions, post them in the homework section as you did for this one, just put at the beginning of your title for the question: For David Scrafton, then ask your question.

 

Many thanks,

David

Customer: replied 8 years ago.
ok thank you so much have a great day!Smile
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