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Nurse Susan
Nurse Susan, Nurse (RN)
Category: Health
Satisfied Customers: 1091
Experience:  RN, BSN, MSN-ED, Nurse Educator whose passion is helping people understand their health and wellness
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Proper body mechanics and lifting at work

Customer Question

proper body mechanics and lifting at work
Submitted: 6 years ago.
Category: Health
Expert:  Dr. Owen replied 6 years ago.
Hello, and I am pleased to help, use of my answers are for educational purposes only.
What specifically are you looking for?
Customer: replied 6 years ago.
as a nurse aide i use a easy lift to transport residents using a measing device to see how much weight is being pushed pulled and turned does it add more weight when using poor body mechanics than proper technics this with a lifting device or just lifting
Expert:  Dr. Owen replied 6 years ago.
I'm trying to figure out what you mean...Do you mean are you lifting, pulling, etc MORE weight if you are NOT using proper body mechanics?
Customer: replied 6 years ago.
i'm using a lift for resident transfer chair to bed and while pullin and turning using poor body mechanics does it make it more weight on me than if using the proper like if i'm turning proper would be to use feet well your whole body when twisting at the waist only would be doing it wrong does that make it more weight to turn or harder
Expert:  Dr. Owen replied 6 years ago.
You are putting more 'stress' on your waist than if you were using your legs/thighs to provide your energy to life. You should try to eliminate using your back to life, and use your lower extremities to Power your lift.
Customer: replied 6 years ago.
i know about the stress but my question is if measured would that show that stress in weight even if it wold be by for say 1 pound
Expert:  Dr. Owen replied 6 years ago.
Sometimes a minor weight of 1 pound could make a difference...
Customer: replied 6 years ago.
Relist: right now i have no more time have to go to work the answer wasn't complete and for what little i got it took too long and now i have no time to keep replying so later when i have more time to explain myself better and have time to wait i will be back.
right now i have no more time have to go to work the answer wasn't complete and for what little i got it took too long and now i have no time to keep replying so later when i have more time to explain myself better and have time to wait i will be back
Expert:  Dr. Owen replied 6 years ago.
IF you can explain a bit more what you are asking, I would be able to help - I am having a difficult time understanding the 'exact' nature of what you are asking - ???
Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 6 years ago.

Hello Jacustomer,

As you relisted this question I would like to try to help you here. Body mechanics in lifting is a HUGE issue for nurses and nurses aides.

As for the weight, the weight of the patient isn't changed if you lift with improper body mechanics, but you will, by lifting improperly, feel that weight far more in places that may be damaged. Thats why lifting with your legs and not your back is taught; if you use your back to lift a patient, that places allot of strain on the spine. The muscles of the legs and thighs, however, can absorb this weight and work with it far more readily and with less risk of injury.

Using lifts such as a hoyer lift takes away lots of the risk to you as the lift does the heavier work. If poor body mechanics are used, it can make the weight seem heavier. And the muscles that bear that weight would be affected. Poor body mechanics place more weight on muscles and areas that carry a greater risk for damage; good body mechanics place that weight and stress on areas that are better suited for lifting, carrying, pushing and pulling.

I hope I was able to help and clarify,

Sincerely,

Susan