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Dr. F.
Dr. F., Doctor (MD)
Category: Health
Satisfied Customers: 49
Experience:  Board certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary and Sleep Disorders
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What does a respiratory ventilator look like and how is it

Customer Question

what does a respiratory ventilator look like and how is it inserted into the body?
Submitted: 11 years ago.
Category: Health
Expert:  Dr. F. replied 11 years ago.
I am a board certified pulmonary physician.(lung specialist)

A respiratory ventilator is a machine that breathes for you. It is not inserted in the body. It is generally a squarish type machine that can be about 15x15 inches or sometimes is a large machine, about 4 feet high which sits on the floor.
A ventilator delivers air into the lungs by
way of a tube inserted through the nose or mouth into the trachea (windpipe). It can also be attached to a tracheostomy tube.

If you need more information about mechanical ventilators, let me know.

Dr. F.
Dr. F., Doctor (MD)
Category: Health
Satisfied Customers: 49
Experience: Board certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary and Sleep Disorders
Dr. F. and 5 other Health Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 11 years ago.
Reply to Dr. F.'s Post: dURING A RECNT HOSPITALIZATION, MY DOCTOR SAID THAT I WAS ON A VENTILATOR FOR SIX DAYS. (I WAS UNCONSCIOUS FOR MOST OF THIS ADMISSION, BUT NO ONE ELSE REMEMBERS SEEING THE VENTILATOR.) IS THIS POSSIBLE?
Expert:  Dr. F. replied 11 years ago.
It is possible!!
The newer ventilators may look just like a computer screen and may look like a ventilator. It is easy for it to blend in with the other equipment in a critical care area because there is generally so much equipment and it is all confusing.

The real way someone from your family might know would be because you would have been connected to the ventilator by a tube. The tube would have been in your nose, or your mouth or by a tracheostomy tube in your neck (which would have been put in surgically and leave a scar, so you would know if that was there)

Good luck and thanks for the accept. Positive feedback is appreciatd and helps my ratings.
Thanks
Dr. F
Customer: replied 11 years ago.
Relist:
Is it customary when a ventilator is removed that the patient's vocal chord can be damaged and/or cause hoarseness?
Expert:  4ren6 replied 11 years ago.

Yes ma'am as I was answering your question on this last night our system went down for maintenance. I had sent the first post and was continuing but we had a 2:00 am shut down and I am on EST.

But yes this can and will occur sometimes due to the tube placed within the area of the vocal chords. This was mentioned in my post to you last night.

I hope this better helps you understand. More info is also at the original post from last night: http://www.justanswer.com/JA/ASP_A/T_463568/TR/typical-patient.htm

I apologize for our getting lost while the scheduled maintenance was being done.