How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Kavey Your Own Question
Kavey
Kavey, Shop Owner
Category: GMC
Satisfied Customers: 4017
Experience:  General Repair Shop Owner
66997337
Type Your GMC Question Here...
Kavey is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

GM Yukon: I have a 2000 Yukon that started blowing hot air

Customer Question

I have a 2000 Yukon that started blowing hot air when the ac is turned on. I had a measure & charge bottle so I checked the charge and I was 65 psi and dropped to 25 psi when the compressor kicks in then immediately goes back up the 65 psi. How do I fix this problem?
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: GMC
Expert:  Kavey replied 2 years ago.
Hello. My name is ***** ***** I will be helping you today.What it is doing is called short cycling and from the pressures you gave me its because it is low on refrigerant.With the compressor not running it should be around 100 PSI and when the compressor kicks on it should be around 35-40 or so.Charge it up to those pressures and it should run fine.
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
I guess the short cycling is why the compressor keeps kicking on and off? When I charge it does the ac need to be on?
Expert:  Kavey replied 2 years ago.
The short cycling is what it is called when the compressor keeps kicking on and off in short cycles.Generally it will only suck in the refrigerant from the little cans while the compressor is running. You hook it up and every time the compressor kicks on it will suck in a little and it will run a little longer each time till the pressures get up then eventually it will run normal and you keep charging till the pressure gets to 35-40 with the compressor running.