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Anna
Anna, Teacher, writer, biologist
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I had loblolly pines planted 5 weeks ago in Alabama. Some of

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I had loblolly pines planted 5 weeks ago in Alabama. Some of these have turned brown. They were seedlings from a nursery. How long should i wait to see if they survive? Is 5 weeks time enough or is there a way to test before vegetation covers them?
Hello, Thank you for using this service. I wish to introduce myself. I am a Research Librarian with 20+ years of experience.

Beautiful pines you picked out from the nursery as they are a North American native and popular in the south. This pine has dark green needles and narrow red to brown cones. The pine can grow to up to 100 feet tall.

I would not give up quite yet on your new pines. Growth is influenced by the physical and chemical properties of soils (texture, compaction, aeration, moisture, pH, nutrients), light, temperature, and precipitation. The best soil to plant would be one that is acid based. Try to fertilize with a slow release fertilizer with a 10-10-10 formula. Monitor the soil over the next few months to ensure it is kept moist.

Be sure that you planted the pines in full sun and have room to expand since they grow fast (up to 35 feet wide).

Auburn University School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences has a detailed explanation of why some seedlings have not done well after planting. Go ahead and review to see if there are additional things that you can do as there are steps listed here to help in growth from seedlings:

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/nreos/forest/feop/forum/14waystokill.pdf




Hello,

I am a biologist with 40 years experience growing trees. I'm sorry to hear some of your pines have turned brown. If they are completely brown and yellow, they are dead. When dealing with deciduous trees (oak, maple, willow, etc.), the twigs will break if dead, and bend if not. That test isn't reliable with evergreens. Once a needle, a twig, or a branch turns brown it will never turn green again. If there is green, new growth at th e top, the seedlings may survive. If not, they are dead. Evergreens stay pliable for quite some time after death is certain. Think about real Christmas trees. We cut them, and there is no potential for them to live. Yet, the twigs remain flexible long after the trees are thrown out. You can confirm this information here:

http://plantfacts.osu.edu/faq/rss_display.lasso?id=280

Your seedlings may not be technically dead, but if there is no green left on them, they are certainly dying and there is absolutely no chance they will grow. If there is green on them, new growth may appear with proper care, but the parts that ahve turned brown will never be green again. If you have more questions, let me know by clicking on REPLY. I wish I'd had better news for you.

Anna
Anna, Teacher, writer, biologist
Category: General
Satisfied Customers: 11509
Experience: Great research skills, variety of work experiences, teaching experience.
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