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Brian Michels
Brian Michels, Certified Public Accountant (CPA)
Category: Finance
Satisfied Customers: 162
Experience:  Partner at Michels & Hanley CPAs, LLP
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Second opinion] What allows one to claim head of household

Customer Question

Second opinion] What allows one to claim head of household filing status?
Submitted: 6 months ago.
Category: Finance
Expert:  Brian Michels replied 6 months ago.
The head of household status can lead to a lower taxable income and greater potential refund than the single filing status, but to qualify, you must meet certain criteria. To file as head of household, you must:Pay for more than half of the household expenses
Be considered unmarried for the tax year, and
You must have a qualifying child or dependent.
Some of these terms, such as "considered unmarried" and "qualifying child or dependent" may seem a bit confusing, but the IRS has provided a series of guidelines to help taxpayers understand whether or not they qualify to file as head of household.Maintaining a householdThe first requirement for filing as head of household is that you must have paid for more than half of the expenses involved in maintaining your household during the tax year. This means that you must have paid more than half of the total household bills, including rent or mortgage, utility bills, insurance, property taxes, groceries, repairs and other common household expenses.If you receive financial assistance toward your household expenses from a parent or other individual, you can still qualify to file as head of household as long as you are paying for more than 50 percent of the bills with your own earnings, savings, or capital.Considered unmarriedThe IRS also requires all taxpayers who file as head of household to be "considered unmarried" as of the last day of the tax year. To be considered unmarried means:You have never been married
You are divorced or legally separated from your spouse
You lived away from your spouse for at least the last six months of the tax year
Your spouse is a nonresident alien and you have a qualifying child who lived with you for more than half of the year.
Keep in mind that if you and your spouse lived in separate homes due to a temporary circumstance, such as military service, business trips, a stay in a medical treatment facility, or attendance at college, the IRS still considers you married for that tax year.Qualifying childThe requirement for a qualifying child or dependent extends beyond just your own son or daughter. To be considered a qualifying child, the child must meet the criteria in each of the following categories:The child must be your biological child, stepchild, foster child, sibling, step sibling, half sibling, or a descendant (child, grandchild, great grandchild, etc.) of one of these relatives.
The child must have lived within your home for more than six months during the tax year.
The child needs to be younger than you.
As of the end of the tax year, the child must be under 19 if he is not a student, or under 24 if he is a full-time college student.
The child must not have paid for more than half of his living expenses during the tax year.
In some cases, you may be eligible to file as head of household even if you are unable to claim your child as a dependent. For divorced or separated parents, if the child lived in your home for more than half of the year, you may file as head of household, even if the divorce or separation agreement gives the other parent the right to claim the child as a dependent.Qualifying dependentIf your dependent does not meet the criteria to be a qualifying child, you may still qualify to file as head of household. The following relatives are considered qualifying dependents for the head of household filing status as long as you provided more than half of her financial support and she lived with you for more than half of the year:Your biological child, stepchild, foster child, sibling, step sibling, half sibling or a descendant (child, grandchild, great grandchild, etc.) of one of these relatives who is permanently and totally disabled, even if he or she does not meet the age requirements to be a qualifying child.
Your mother or father.
Your stepfather, stepmother, niece, nephew, a sibling of one of your parents, or your son-in-law, daughter-in-law, father-in-law, mother-in-law, brother-in-law or sister-in-law.
Even if your father or mother did not live with you for more than half of the tax year, you may still qualify to file as head of household. If you paid for more than half of the living expenses for your parent's main home throughout the entire tax year and you are eligible to claim him as a dependent, then you may file as head of household.
Expert:  Brian Michels replied 6 months ago.

I wanted to follow up and see if you had any further questions. If your question has been resolved I would appreciate your feedback rating so I receive credit for the response. Thank you