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Dr. Rick
Dr. Rick, Board Certified MD
Category: Eye
Satisfied Customers: 11360
Experience:  Ophthalmology since 1994 with Retina sub-specialty interest
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I've been suffering with eye twitches for a couple of months

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Hi,
I've been suffering with eye twitches for a couple of months now and had been really worries about a serious illness causing it, until someone suggested I have my eyes tested. I have worn glasses all my life (current prescription -1.25 left eye -2.50 right eye), and my prescription has been the same for the last 5/6 years.
I had an eye test yesterday and was shocked to find that my vision has apparently improved and my prescription is now -0.50 left eye -1.25 right eye ... I am 33 and have always had my sight getting gradually worse, never better, and as my last eye test was less than 2 years ago I'm really surprised by this result.
Is this normal or should I get a second opinion?
Many thanks
Dr. Rick :

Hi. I'm online and happy to answer your question today.

Dr. Rick :

It is not unusual for your eyeglass prescription to change. As long as the new glasses are working for you I do not see any reason to get another opinion.

Dr. Rick :

Now. As to your eye twitches, which I know you didn't ask about.....

Dr. Rick :

The most likely cause of your symptoms is called myokymia. Myokymia is an involuntary, local twitching of a few muscle fibers in the body of a muscle. This twitching, if it occurs in a limb, is not strong enough to actually move a joint but can be felt and sometimes seen as an area of quivering.

Myokymia commonly involves the eyelids and muscles around the orbit. It often appears and resolves for no apparent reason and has not been linked to any underlying significant pathology. What causes myokymia? Studies have shown that it is associated with anxiety, stress, lack of good sleep, high caffeine intake and the use of some drugs.

The best way to treat myokymia is to get more sleep, decrease caffeine intake and decrease stress. The good news is that myokymia is not a sign of serious underlying pathology and often resolves on its own.

Here is an excellent article on this topic:

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1213160-overview

Dr. Rick :

Does this make sense to you?

Dr. Rick :

Please remember the top 3 ratings are positives and Excellent service is my goal. Your positive feedback is how we are compensated. If you aren't 100% satisfied, just click "reply." I will be happy to discuss your issue in more depth and do everything I can to provide you with the information you require.

Otherwise, a high positive rating is very much appreciated, bonuses are great, and find me anytime for follow up.


Let me know if you have further questions.

Dr. Rick :

Good Morning and greetings from Wisconsin. I was just finishing up with your question.

Is there anything else you would like to ask me before I head off to the clinic to start my day? It is 6 am here.......


Customer:

Thank you very much for your answer. I haven't actually received the new glasses yet as they'll take a week to come back, but I was concerned that such a rapid change in prescription might indicate something untoward happening? Also, when I did the autorefractor test the images did not come into perfect focus which concerned me that perhaps something was wrong?


Dr. Rick :

That is possible as autorefractors are a computer and, as we all know, computers can mess up.

I'm sure, however, that your eye doctor did not prescribe your glasses directly off the data from the autorefractor but, rather, did a manual refraction herself first. If not....time to change eye doctors :-)

Dr. Rick :

But, a change in eyeglasses Rx is not, in and of itself, a sign of ocular disease...


Customer:

It was the other way round bizarrely! I had the puffer test, autorefractor, retina pictures, then

they scanned my current glasses then I went in and had the test chart and opthalmoscope ... it all just seems strange as I'm wearing my (apparently too strong glasses) now and things are clear but I must admit mid distance and laptop seems a little hazy. So I guess my final question is, (I'm a bit of a health anxiety person I'm afraid), is it normal for eyes to 'get better' and with the full eye exam being ok do you think things are normal?

Dr. Rick :

Yes. This is normal. If your full eye exam didn't find any pathology I believe you can rest assured that everything is OK and, like millions of other people, your glasses Rx just changed :-)

Dr. Rick :

Of course, if you are still worried I would recommend seeing an ophthalmologist as they are, of course, better trained then an optician or an optometrist. But, from what you have posted, I don't feel strongly that this is necessary.


Dr. Rick :

Do you feel better now?

Customer:

That's great, thank you very much for your help. Have a good day at work and I will leave feedback now.


Dr. Rick :

My pleasure. You too.

Dr. Rick :

Please remember the top 3 ratings are positives and Excellent service is my goal. Your positive feedback is how we are compensated. If you aren't 100% satisfied, just click "reply." I will be happy to discuss your issue in more depth and do everything I can to provide you with the information you require.

Otherwise, a high positive rating is very much appreciated, bonuses are great, and find me anytime for follow up.


Let me know if you have further questions.

Dr. Rick and other Eye Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

Hi there,

Sorry to bother you again but after your great advice I thought I'd just ask one final question. I went to collect my new prescription today (the one which is three grades weaker than the prescription I've had for the last 10 years) and put the glasses on - it was blurred and nowhere near strong enough.

I put my regular glasses on and can see perfectly - I didn't think that it was possible for a High Street Optician to make such a big mistake in a prescription, especially when using an Autorefractor, but do you think this is possible?

I have an appointment scheduled for Friday for a re-test but am now really concerned that the prescription he has given me isn't right and that there might be something wrong with my eyes if that's the strength the Autorefractor says I should be?

Thank you for all your help

Anyone can make mistakes.....and an autorefractor doesn't make the final Rx any better....
I'd not worry that the problem is with your eyes.....it is with the person who wrote your eyeglass Rx.
I know you will find this hard to believe but....I've even made mistakes before ;-)
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

Hi again,

Thank you very much for that - I had my eyes re-tested yesterday and the optician confirmed that they had improved as per the prescription he did the last week. He suggested I wear the glasses for 2 weeks even though I feel that they are blurrred at a distance, and I've worn them for two days now and it feels really strange - can you advise on what I should do?

Thanks so much

He is correct...I usually suggest at least 3 weeks of full time wear to allow you brain to "get used to them"
Good to hear from you again. Have a good day.
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