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Dr. Dan B.
Dr. Dan B., Board Certified Ophthalmologist
Category: Eye
Satisfied Customers: 3343
Experience:  Eye surgeon experienced in cataracts, glaucoma, retina & neuro-ophthalmology
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I had a retinal tear reaired just over a month ago and

Resolved Question:

I had a retinal tear reaired just over a month ago and although post exam confirmed successful, I'm still experiencing lots of floaters and a grey veil effect in my eye - how long will this last?
Submitted: 5 years ago.
Category: Eye
Expert:  Dr. Dan B. replied 5 years ago.
Doctor DanB :

Hello and thanks for your question. Are you available to chat?

Doctor DanB :

The floaters can, unfortunately, last indefinitely. Though, for most people, they tend to get better over time through one or more of three different mechanisms: 1) They can drift more out of your view; 2) they can break up more; and 3) (usually the most reliable method) the brain will start to learn how to ignore them. But most people, are still left with some remnant of these floaters indefinitely. As far as the grey veil effect, that really depends on what's causing it--if it's over the entire vision, it may be from multiple tiny floaters and/or hemorrhage (small amounts of blood in the vitreous gel) and if so, that should really start to clear over the next month or so. If the veil is in the periphery of your vision, then this may represent an area where the retina started to detach associated with the tear and the laser was used to seal the area around the tear to not allow the retina to detach further than the immediate vicinity around the tear. If that's the case, you may be left with this small veil in the periphery of your vision for the foreseeable future as well.

Doctor DanB :

Does this make sense? Does this information help address your concerns?

Do you have any other concerns or questions about this topic?

I am happy to be able to help you today. I will also be happy to answer any other questions until you have the information you need. It appears as though you are not in the chat room currently.



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My opinion is solely informative and does not constitute a formal medical opinion or recommendation. For a formal medical opinion and/or recommendation you must see an eye doctor.


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Expert:  Dr. Dan B. replied 5 years ago.
The floaters can, unfortunately, last indefinitely. Though, for most people, they tend to get better over time through one or more of three different mechanisms: 1) They can drift more out of your view; 2) they can break up more; and 3) (usually the most reliable method) the brain will start to learn how to ignore them. But most people, are still left with some remnant of these floaters indefinitely. As far as the grey veil effect, that really depends on what's causing it--if it's over the entire vision, it may be from multiple tiny floaters and/or hemorrhage (small amounts of blood in the vitreous gel) and if so, that should really start to clear over the next month or so. If the veil is in the periphery of your vision, then this may represent an area where the retina started to detach associated with the tear and the laser was used to seal the area around the tear to not allow the retina to detach further than the immediate vicinity around the tear. If that's the case, you may be left with this small veil in the periphery of your vision for the foreseeable future as well.
5/4/12 2:00 PM
Does this make sense? Does this information help address your concerns?
Do you have any other concerns or questions about this topic?
I am happy to be able to help you today. I will also be happy to answer any other questions until you have the information you need. It appears as though you are not in the chat room currently.
If you would like to ask further questions or clarification regarding anything I've said, please let me know and I will be happy to address your concerns.
If not, Please help me get credit for my efforts in answering your questions and press the ACCEPT button for this encounter; this allows part of the funds that you have deposited to the website to be released for my efforts to assist you. This does not end our conversation, however-we can continue to discuss any of your concerns without further charges until you are satisfied.
Any positive feedback and/or bonus you may feel prompted to provide would be welcomed and is appreciated. There will be an opportunity to provide either or both of these after you press the ACCEPT button. Thanks for your inquiry!
My opinion is solely informative and does not constitute a formal medical opinion or recommendation. For a formal medical opinion and/or recommendation you must see an eye doctor.
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