Employment Law

Employment law questions? Ask an employment lawyer.

Ask a Lawyer,
Get an Answer ASAP!

An overview: I work in digital media advertising sales. I've…

Customer Question
An overview: I work in digital...
An overview:
I work in digital media advertising sales. I've been in the industry since 2010, specifically on the sales side since 2012 calling on clients (brand direct) and advertising agencies throughout the Southeast territory ever since. Primarily my territory has been NC, SC, Ga and FL)
In Sept of 2016, I began working for a company called MaxPoint Interactive, when I signed a non-compete agreement that seems very broad in scope excluding me from working for a competitor in the space for a year following termination of employment. (I can not find an exact copy of my agreement, but I was able to get a copy that reads "california" as the state as opposed to "georgia" in my case. I have attached it here.
My title was Senior Sales Executive, which is an individual contributor role, not considered an executive officer or particularly senior within the organization, with no special access to proprietary information or practices. I had no insight into actual digital coding or the workings of any of their proprietary data. My territory was a list of certain ad agencies in NC, Ga and FL.
If you aren't familiar with the industry, there are literally hundreds of companies in the digital media advertising space that have similar offerings. Client/Ad Agencies work with many of these companies at a time and there are no exclusive contracts or anything of the sort.
MaxPoint Interactive was acquired by Valassis Digital in October of 2017 in a stock purchase. Here are two articles:
http://www.valassis.com/about-us/newsroom/item/170828/valassis-to-acquire-maxpoint-for-13-86-per-share-in-cash
https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2017/08/28/1100960/0/en/Valassis-to-Acquire-MaxPoint-Interactive-for-13-86-per-Share-in-Cash.html
In February of 2018, Valassis Digital asked all employees to sign a new non-compete agreement, which I never signed.
there was not a discussion about this, I simply let the docusign link expire and was never contacted about it again.
Based on this, I was under the impression that the original MaxPoint non-compete was no longer valid and that I was not bound to any non-compete agreement since I did not sign the Valassis Digital agreement. I reviewed the MaxPoint non-compete and it appears there is a clause where it could be assignable.
Through this acquisition my benefits, client list, comp plan, payment schedule, team and reporting structure all underwent significant changes-- nearly all of which were in ways that negatively effected me. So I began looking for a new job and was recently hired at a digital sales company called AdTheorent on 5/21.
While there are similarities, they focus on Artificial intelligent predictive modeling that is competely different from Valassis Digital (which focuses on neighborhood level intelligence) and custom creative services that have never even been a part of the offering at Valassis Digital or MaxPoint prior to that.
Worth noting, nobody in my Atlanta Georgia office covering the southeast territory had ever even heard of AdTheorent before. I hadn't either until the interview process. There are many competitors in our space that are more direct that I and that team would all be aware of..
Valassis Digital was aware that I was staying in digital ad sales, many knew the company I was going to, they asked me to work an additional week to help with turnover which I happily obliged, and everyone wished me well. I even had a conversation with the head of sales who said I was always welcome to come back. The business was strong, I walked away from tens of thousands of dollars of commissions that are not payable upon resignation, and they quickly replaced my position with another internal employee who I even set up introductory calls with to introduce him to the clients to help with a seamless transition. In all senses I felt I had left on very good terms.
On Friday (6/1/18, I received a note from Valassis Digital HR expressing that they were aware I was working for Adtheorent and possibly in violation of the Sept 2018 MaxPoint non-compete and that they may contact my new employer. (body of email included below). I have not responded or acknowledged receipt of this email.
Quite a few other former employees have also left (both prior and after the acquisition) to go to companies that could absolutely be considered competitors and from my knowledge after speaking with a few of them, not a single one has been pursued as being in breach of a non-compete agreement. The former head of sales actually hired probably 8 people away to go to a competitor and while the head of sales was just sent a cease and desist, none of the employees were sent any kind of a notice of a breach.
I don't know if this is simply a scare tactic, or how far they are planning to take this. I have a few preliminary notes/questions:
Do you think I need to alert my new employer? (When I started I signed an agreement that I didn't have a non-compete.)
Submitted: 2 months ago.Category: Employment Law
Show More
Show Less
Ask Your Own Employment Law Question
Answered in 2 hours by:
6/4/2018
Employment Lawyer: Robert L,
 replied 2 months ago
Robert L
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 331
Experience: Associate Attorney at Henrickson & Serrebutra, LLC
Verified

Good evening, I am an attorney (legal expert) with JustAnswer. I have a near 100% customer satisfaction rate, and I will be answering your question(s) today. Before proceeding, please remember that JustAnswer provides general legal information only and such general legal information does not constitute legal advice or the formation of an attorney-client relationship.

Please allow me a few minutes to review your question and pull a few resources.

Ask Your Own Employment Law Question
Employment Lawyer: Robert L,
 replied 2 months ago

Thank you for your patience.

What follows is my answer to your question:

I am afraid that without a copy of your non-compete agreement, I am not able to provide you with specific answers regarding its applicability in Georgia. You will be glad to know that Georgia is very hostile to non-compete clauses, but that does not mean that a Georgia court will not enforce one or modify a badly drafted one to become enforceable in what is called "blue penciling."

Prior to you notifying your new employer about the potential non-compete, I would encourage you to obtain a copy of the agreement from your old employer and either submit that document for review to an expert here on JustAnswer or speak with a local employment attorney. With that being said, you will not want to delay in finding out if your agreement is enforceable because your employer can terminate you for not disclosing the non-compete agreement.

So that you are better equipped to review your agreement or speak with an attorney, I have included a FAQ about the old v. new law below.

Non-Compete Q&A

On November 2, 2010, Georgia voters approved a constitutional amendment that has dramatically changed the law associated with Georgia non-compete agreements. These change in law only applies to agreements entered into on or after May 11, 2011. The old law still applies to agreements entered before that date.

THE FOLLOWING ARE FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS THAT, AS INDICATED, ARE APPLICABLE TO AGREEMENTS ENTERED INTO PRIOR TO MAY 11, 2011 UNDER THE "OLD LAW", AND AGREEMENTS ENTERED INTO SUBSEQUENT TO MAY 11, 2011 UNDER THE "NEW LAW".

1. What is a non-compete agreement? (What are the differences between and among non-compete, non-solicitation and confidentiality/non-disclosure provisions)?

Both under the Old and New Law, attorneys often use the term "restrictive covenants" to describe four (4) main types of provisions commonly found in employment agreements - (1) non-compete provisions, (2) non-solicitation of customers provisions; (3) non-solicitation of employees or "anti-raiding" or "no-hire" provisions; and, (4) confidentiality or non-disclosure provisions. These provisions are sometimes collectively referred to as "non-compete" agreements by lay persons. In fact, a non-compete provision is quite different from a non-solicitation or confidentiality provision and vice-versa. Georgia courts readily distinguish non-compete agreements from customer and employee non-solicitation provisions and confidentiality/non-disclosure provisions.

Non-compete agreements are primarily deigned to restrict a person from competing against his or her former employer by starting his own business or working for a competitor in the same field as his former employer. An employee could breach an enforceable non-compete agreement by simply holding a job with a competitor even if he or she doesn't solicit or take a single customer from his or her former employer. A covenant not to compete normally is designed to protect the employer's investment of time and money in developing the employee's skills in addition to other “protectable interests” of the employer.

A covenant not to solicit customers is designed primarily to protect the employer's investment of time and money in developing customer relationships and prohibits an employee from soliciting the employer's clients subsequent to their termination. Unlike non-compete agreements, non-solicitation agreements (standing alone) do not generally restrict a former employee from working for a competitor in a given capacity. For example, a person bound only by an enforceable customer non-solicitation provision could possibly sell insurance for herself or for a competitor of his or her former employer for as long as he or she doesn't sell insurance to former customers of his or her former employer with whom the employee had contact while working for the former employer.

Non-solicitation of employee provisions, no-hire or anti-raiding provisions are designed to prevent former employees from soliciting, hiring or inducing other employees to leave the former employer and work for a competitor. Confidentiality or non-disclosure provisions are frequently used in conjunction with non-compete and non-solicit agreements. They protect a business against a current or former employee disclosing confidential, proprietary or trade secret information.

2. Are non-compete provisions enforceable in Georgia?

OLD LAW

Yes. But under the Old Law it was and is very difficult to do so. 85-90% of such agreements we review are, in fact, not enforceable. While Georgia has long been considered to be a very "pro-employer" state, Georgia courts long disfavored non-compete agreements and applied "strict-scrutiny" to such provisions executed in the context of an employer-employee relationship. The enforceability of a non-compete agreement in Georgia under the Old Law most often depends on the language of the agreement being in precise conformity with the law, and the circumstances in which the agreement was executed. Notably, under the Old Law the unenforceability of any part of a non-compete agreement would unquestionably render all parts of the non-compete unenforceable and would result in the automatic invalidity of any accompanying customer non-solicitation provision (and in some decisions accompanying employee non-solicitation provisions). The bot***** *****ne is that there are many, many loopholes in Georgia under the Old Law that will invalidate Georgia non-compete and customer non-solicitation provisions . Accordingly, companies and individuals attempting to draft, enforce, contest or interpret Georgia non-compete and customer and employee non-solicitation provisions should consult with a qualified attorney such as Atlanta, Georgia non-compete attorney ***** *****.

NEW LAW

In a nutshell, the enactment of Georgia's new Restrictive Covenant Act (the "RCA") has had the effect of making it easier for employers to enforce all types of restrictive covenants. One of the primary reasons for this is that the New Law specifically allows court's to "modify" restrictive covenants under certain circumstances to bring them into acceptable parameters of enforceability. This term is commonly referred to as "blue-penciling". A more thorough discussion of blue-penciling rules under the Old and New Law is set forth below. Keep in mind, however, that even under the more liberal approach to enforcement that the New Law has created, Georgia non-compete agreements and other restrictive covenants can still be invalidated by a court. Therefore, employers and employees alike should seek legal advice from a Georgia non-compete attorney such as ***** ***** Roberts before making any assumption on enforceability issues even under the New Law.

3. What specific requirements make a non-compete provision enforceable in Georgia?

Under both the Old and New Law, to be enforceable in Georgia, a covenant not to compete must first and foremost protect a legitimate business interest and be reasonable in terms of time, geographical area, and the scope of activity to be restrained. While there are other requirements for enforceability including a general requirement of "reasonableness under the circumstances," these are the primary areas of inquiry by a Georgia Court in determining facial enforceability.

4. If a non-compete agreement is found to be unenforceable by a Georgia court, can the court modify or "blue-pencil" the non-compete to make it enforceable?

OLD LAW

No. Unlike most other states, under the Old Law, Georgia will not "blue-pencil" a non-compete provision to bring it into conformity with the law. An exception to this rule arises in the context of a non-compete agreement executed in connection with the sale of a business.

NEW LAW

Georgia Courts unquestionably have the power under the New Law to blue pencil overly broad covenants in certain circumstances. However, what remains an open question of law because of an arguable ambiguity in the New Law is whether a court can re-write an overbroad covenant (by adding or changing terms, etc), or whether a Georgia court's blue-penciling power is limited to simply striking through unenforceable provisions and enforcing the remainder of a covenant (if it remains enforceable after the severing of bad terms).

5. Are there different standards for determining the enforceability of non-compete agreements executed in the context of a partnership agreement or the sale of a business?

OLD LAW

Yes. While Georgia courts apply "strict scrutiny" to non-compete agreements executed in the traditional employer-employee setting, a "middle-level" scrutiny is applied in the context of a partnership agreement and "lesser scrutiny" is applied in the context of a non-compete executed in conjunction with the sale of a business. In fact, under the Old Law, a Court could blue-pencil an overbroad covenant entered into in the context of a sale of business (although a Court's powers to do so is limited under the Old Law to simply striking through unenforceable provisions and enforcing the remainder of a covenant if it remains enforceable after the severing of bad terms).

NEW LAW

Under the New Law, the level of scrutiny applied to a covenant depending on the context in which it was entered is not as an important of a consideration as it was under the Old Law. However, there are some different rules under the New Law regarding time components, etc. depending on the context in which the covenant was entered.

6. Is there a statute or law "on the books" in Georgia that governs the enforceability of non-compete agreements?

OLD LAW

No. While the Georgia Constitution prohibits contracts which may have the effect of lessening competition, under the Old Law Georgia did not have a "non-compete statute" like other states such as Florida. Instead, for agreements entered into prior to May 11, 2011, Georgia non-compete law is governed by the "common law" (previous decisions of Georgia courts). Accordingly, it is imperative that any attorney representing clients in Georgia non-compete law matters be very familiar with the relevant cases in this area because there is no statute under the Old Law to refer to.

NEW LAW

While the New Law is a statute, it is not a very well drafted one and it is full of ambiguities and unanswered questions. Without a greater understanding of the law in this area, simply reading the New Law statute may not yield answers to complex legal questions involving Georgia non-compete agreements under the New Law. It is therefore important for employers and employees alike to consult with an attorney well-versed in this area of the law such as Atlanta non-compete attorney ***** ***** when faced with legal issues implicating Georgia's new non-compete law.

7. Can an employee be fired for refusing to sign a non-compete agreement after he or she begins employment? In such a case, can the non-compete be held to be enforceable?

Georgia is a strong "at-will" employment state meaning that absent an agreement for employment for a specified period of time, a Georgia employee can be fired for a good reason, a bad reason or no reason at all so long as the termination is not based on race, sex, religion or other protected classes or circumstances. Thus, in Georgia, an employee can be fired for refusing to sign a non-compete agreement under both the Old and New Law. Interestingly, however, the New Law specifically allows Courts to take into consideration the economic hardship that would result from the enforcement of a Georgia non-compete agreement against an individual. Therefore, the fact that an employee was involuntarily terminated could be an issue in certain cases with regard to questions of judicial enforcement.

8. If an employee is required to execute a non-compete agreement after he or she begins employment, must the employer provide the employee some additional "consideration" in exchange for the non-compete agreement?

No. As noted above, and under both the Old and New Law, Georgia employers can insist that employees execute non-compete agreements after the employment relationship begins. In such case, an employer in Georgia does not have to provide additional consideration as the court will consider the employees "continued employment" to be adequate consideration. This is not the law in other states such as North Carolina.

I hope that my explanation above has fully answered/resolved your question. If it has, please rate my service with 5 stars as I always try to provide 5 star service. If you still have questions about your issue or if my answer is in anyway unclear, please do not hesitate to ask for clarification. I will do my best to clear up any confusion or misunderstanding.

Please remember that this answer is general legal information only and does not constitute legal advice nor result in the formation of an attorney-client relationship.

Ask Your Own Employment Law Question
Employment Lawyer: Robert L,
 replied 2 months ago

Good morning, I am just following up to see if you have any further questions. If you still have questions, please do not hesitate to let me know what they are. Please also, remember to provide a rating as that is the only way that JustAnswer can close out your question. My goal is to answer your question to your satisfaction. Please rate with five stars (★★★★★) and click SEND. It does not cost anything extra to rate.

Ask Your Own Employment Law Question
Employment Lawyer: Robert L,
 replied 2 months ago

Good morning, I am just following up to see if your question has been answered to your satisfaction. If it, please let me know and JustAnswer will close out your question. If your question has not been answered to your satisfaction, please let me know what issues you may still have and we can clear them up quickly.

Best,

R.

Ask Your Own Employment Law Question
Was this answer helpful?

How JustAnswer works

step-image
Describe your issueThe assistant will guide you
step-image
Chat 1:1 with an employment lawyerLicensed Experts are available 24/7
step-image
100% satisfaction guaranteeGet all the answers you need
Ask Robert L Your Own Question
Robert L
Robert L
Robert L
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 331
331 Satisfied Customers
Experience: Associate Attorney at Henrickson & Serrebutra, LLC

Robert L is online now

A new question is answered every 9 seconds

How JustAnswer works:

  • Ask an ExpertExperts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional AnswerVia email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site. Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction GuaranteeRate the answer you receive.

JustAnswer in the News:

Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com.
JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal questions from readers about layoffs, unemployment and severance.
Web sites like justanswer.com/legal
...leave nothing to chance.
Traffic on JustAnswer rose 14 percent...and had nearly 400,000 page views in 30 days...inquiries related to stress, high blood pressure, drinking and heart pain jumped 33 percent.
Tory Johnson, GMA Workplace Contributor, discusses work-from-home jobs, such as JustAnswer in which verified Experts answer people’s questions.
I will tell you that...the things you have to go through to be an Expert are quite rigorous.

What Customers are Saying:

I must thank you all for such a positive and knowledgeable Expert in your Employment Law category. She has provided much relief and answers for me in the midst of dealing with a case. I am totally pleased with her customer service and care.

MildredWashington, DC

Excellent direction from Socrateaser to help me preserve and pursue my rights as a proud American who has become unemployed in this messed-up economic downfall. Thank you

Happy CustomerDenver, CO

Mr. Kaplun clearly had an exceptional understanding of the issue and was able to explain it concisely. I would recommend JustAnswer to anyone. Great service that lives up to its promises!

Gary B.Edmond, OK

My Expert was fast and seemed to have the answer to my taser question at the tips of her fingers. Communication was excellent. I left feeling confident in her answer.

EricRedwood City, CA

I am very pleased with JustAnswer as a place to go for divorce or criminal law knowledge and insight.

MichaelWichita, KS

PaulMJD helped me with questions I had regarding an urgent legal matter. His answers were excellent.

Three H.Houston, TX

Anne was extremely helpful. Her information put me in the right direction for action that kept me legal, possible saving me a ton of money in the future. Thank you again, Anne!!

ElaineAtlanta, GA

< Previous | Next >

Meet the Experts:

Allen M., Esq.

Allen M., Esq.

Employment Lawyer

13,334 satisfied customers

Employment/Labor Law Litigation

Marsha411JD

Marsha411JD

Lawyer

12,490 satisfied customers

Licensed Attorney with 29 yrs. exp in Employment Law

Infolawyer

Infolawyer

Lawyer

12,478 satisfied customers

Licensed attorney helping employers and employees.

JB Umphrey

JB Umphrey

Lawyer

6,273 satisfied customers

Assisting employees and employers for over 14 years.

John

John

Employment Lawyer

4,029 satisfied customers

Exclusively practice labor and employment law.

Dimitry K., Esq.

Dimitry K., Esq.

Attorney

3,007 satisfied customers

I provide employment and discrimination law advice in my own practice.

ScottyMacEsq

ScottyMacEsq

Lawyer

2,893 satisfied customers

Licensed Texas General Practice Attorney

< Previous | Next >

Related Employment Law Questions
I have a non compete question. My Former employer which I
I have a non compete question. My Former employer which I left on 4/9/2018 has the following statement in my Non competition letter After expiration of this agreement or termination of your employment… read more
PaulmoJD
PaulmoJD
Attorney At Law
Doctoral Degree
106 satisfied customers
I am currently employed by a company based in California,
Hi, I am currently employed by a company based in California, where non-competes are not enforceable, but I live in Florida. When I joined the company, I signed the letter of intent, which mentions a … read more
LegalPro54
LegalPro54
Doctoral Degree
1,258 satisfied customers
I left a company on my own after a major change in
I left a company on my own after a major change in management resulted in poor customer service and poor quality. I am wanting to work in the business still, and have a question about the wording conc… read more
Infolawyer
Infolawyer
Lawyer
Doctoral Degree
12,478 satisfied customers
I live in Ohio and my company was recently acquired by a competitor.
I live in Ohio and my company was recently acquired by a competitor. I'm in sales and was told if I didn't sign a non-compete for the new company I wouldn't have a job on the day of the switchover. My… read more
PaulmoJD
PaulmoJD
Attorney At Law
Doctoral Degree
106 satisfied customers
My Non Compete Agreement states: I acknowledge during my
My Non Compete Agreement states: I acknowledge during my employment I will have access to and knowledge of Proprietary Information. To protect the Company's Proprietary Information, I agree that durin… read more
Marsha411JD
Marsha411JD
Lawyer
Doctoral Degree
12,490 satisfied customers
a family member was recently provided a non-compete contract
a family member was recently provided a non-compete contract that the employer requested to be signed the next day - it would not allow their employees to work for a number of competitors specified fo… read more
KUMI95
KUMI95
Attorney
Doctoral Degree
17 satisfied customers
is a non compete clause assignable to an acquiring company
is a non compete clause assignable to an acquiring company if there is no assignment clause and you resign before the acquisition is finalized?… read more
Allen M., Esq.
Allen M., Esq.
Employment Lawyer
Juris Doctor, Cum Laude
13,334 satisfied customers
I was recently terminated without cause from a toy vending
I was recently terminated without cause from a toy vending company in Colorado. Upon my termination, I owed the company $8500, from a small loan they had extended me previously (it was originally $10,… read more
ScottyMacEsq
ScottyMacEsq
Lawyer
Doctoral Degree
2,893 satisfied customers
The company I work for was acquired by another company in 2002.
The company I work for was acquired by another company in 2002. As part of the acquisition, to keep my job, I was required to sign a non-compete agreement. I am now looking to leave the company to tak… read more
ScottyMacEsq
ScottyMacEsq
Lawyer
Doctoral Degree
2,893 satisfied customers
I was working for a company for about 2 months. I signed a
I was working for a company for about 2 months. I signed a non competition agreement before I could start. Now, another company wants to hire me that is in the same field, but because of the non compe… read more
Marsha411JD
Marsha411JD
Lawyer
Doctoral Degree
12,490 satisfied customers
I recently (7 months ago) separated from an Michigan based
I recently (7 months ago) separated from an Michigan based LLC which sold other companies' products. #None of their own#. The articles of organization had a non compete clause stating that upon separa… read more
Marsha411JD
Marsha411JD
Lawyer
Doctoral Degree
12,490 satisfied customers
I have been employed with a company for 25 years but am looking
I have been employed with a company for 25 years but am looking to possibly change to another company which is a competitor to my current employer. I reside in Arizona, a right to work state. Type pos… read more
Judith
Judith
Owner
Doctoral Degree
459 satisfied customers
Non-compete language was inserted into an agreement of sale
Non-compete language was inserted into an agreement of sale to protect an acquiring company from losing the owner and two sons for two years after the last payment was made in an earn out arrangement.… read more
Phillips Esq.
Phillips Esq.
Attorney
JD
20,543 satisfied customers
I have been presented with a Non-Compete agreement that is
I have been presented with a Non-Compete agreement that is so vague it could prevent me working in my field for 2 years. Is this legal? I have already started the job and now they want the non-compete… read more
Marsha411JD
Marsha411JD
Lawyer
Doctoral Degree
12,490 satisfied customers
Florida - Non Compete is Sales I am in sales (Regional
Florida - Non Compete is Sales: I am in sales (Regional Mgnt). I signed an "Executive Proprietary Matters Agreement" 3.3 years ago. The agreement has both non solcitation and non compete with conficti… read more
Infolawyer
Infolawyer
Lawyer
Doctoral Degree
12,478 satisfied customers
Hello, my company was recently acquired, and I was asked to
Hello, my company was recently acquired, and I was asked to again sign my non-compete, as the original was supposedly lost. The non-compete carries over to the new company. The specifics of the non-co… read more
KUMI95
KUMI95
Attorney
Doctoral Degree
17 satisfied customers
I am working with an online company that is an online magazine
I am working with an online company that is an online magazine publication for women. I am an independant contractor. I sell online ads and events. I have been in the process of starting a company a d… read more
Infolawyer
Infolawyer
Lawyer
Doctoral Degree
12,478 satisfied customers
I have recently been laid off from a company that I was with
I have recently been laid off from a company that I was with for 17 years in sales and for the last 10 years sales management. The company offered me a severance of 6 months pay. I have an employee ag… read more
Faye Lee
Faye Lee
JD and MBA and Masters of Law
96 satisfied customers

DISCLAIMER: Answers from Experts on JustAnswer are not substitutes for the advice of an attorney. JustAnswer is a public forum and questions and responses are not private or confidential or protected by the attorney-client privilege. The Expert above is not your attorney, and the response above is not legal advice. You should not read this response to propose specific action or address specific circumstances, but only to give you a sense of general principles of law that might affect the situation you describe. Application of these general principles to particular circumstances must be done by a lawyer who has spoken with you in confidence, learned all relevant information, and explored various options. Before acting on these general principles, you should hire a lawyer licensed to practice law in the jurisdiction to which your question pertains.

The responses above are from individual Experts, not JustAnswer. The site and services are provided “as is”. To view the verified credential of an Expert, click on the “Verified” symbol in the Expert’s profile. This site is not for emergency questions which should be directed immediately by telephone or in-person to qualified professionals. Please carefully read the Terms of Service (last updated February 8, 2012).

DISCLAIMER: Answers from Experts on JustAnswer are not substitutes for the advice of an attorney. JustAnswer is a public forum and questions and responses are not private or confidential or protected by the attorney-client privilege. The Expert above is not your attorney, and the response above is not legal advice. You should not read this response to propose specific action or address specific circumstances, but only to give you a sense of general principles of law that might affect the situation you describe. Application of these general principles to particular circumstances must be done by a lawyer who has spoken with you in confidence, learned all relevant information, and explored various options. Before acting on these general principles, you should hire a lawyer licensed to practice law in the jurisdiction to which your question pertains.

The responses above are from individual Experts, not JustAnswer. The site and services are provided “as is”. To view the verified credential of an Expert, click on the “Verified” symbol in the Expert’s profile. This site is not for emergency questions which should be directed immediately by telephone or in-person to qualified professionals. Please carefully read the Terms of Service (last updated February 8, 2012).

Show MoreShow Less

Ask Your Question

x