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Tina
Tina, Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 8184
Experience:  JD, BBA, recognized by ABA for excellence.
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My daughter is in her early 50's and has worked for a major

Customer Question

My daughter is in her early 50's and has worked for a major retailer for the past 27 years.
Yesterday all employee hours were cut by half. Additionally she was told she would be on standby corny hours ThT might become available.What recourse does she have regRding unemployment for hours lost? Can an employer tell a person to stand by? How can she supplement her lost income?
Submitted: 1 month ago.
Category: Employment Law
Expert:  LegalKnowledge replied 1 month ago.

Hi! I will be the professional that will be helping you today. I look forward to providing you with information to help with your question and concern

Expert:  LegalKnowledge replied 1 month ago.

Good morning. Yes, she may be able to collect but she will need to try and find other part time work, to supplement / makeup the difference or look for a new, full time job. If you are working less than full-time due to your employer's lack of full-time work, you may be able to collect all or part of your unemployment benefits. Less than full-time means that you are not working more than 80% of the usual hours for your occupation (for example, if a 40 hour work week is common in your occupation, you may be able to receive benefits if you work 32 hours or less).

If you find part-time work with a new employer, you must continue to look for full-time work (if your unemployment claim is based on full-time work). If you do not look for full-time work, you may be ineligible for unemployment benefits.

Whether you are working less than full-time or part-time, you must report your weekly gross wages (including tips) when you claim your benefits. Please note that even if pre-existing part-time employment is not used to calculate your monetary, you must declare all earnings for each week of benefits that you claim. Wages must be reported for the week in which they are earned, not when they are paid. The wages you report will be subtracted from your Partial Benefit Rate. The Partial Benefit Rate is 20% higher than your weekly benefit rate. You cannot be paid more than your weekly benefit rate.

For example, if your weekly benefit rate is $200, your Partial Benefit Rate is $240 (20% higher than $200). If you earn $50 during a week, you would receive $190 in unemployment benefits ($240 - $50 = $190).

Expert:  LegalKnowledge replied 1 month ago.

I just wanted to follow up and see if you had any other questions or needed me to clarify something. I am here to help, so please let me know. Thanks!