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Jason
Jason, Service Technician
Category: Electrical
Satisfied Customers: 4286
Experience:  Over 20 years of experience in all types of installations, troubleshooting, and repairs.
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OK to use Y-splice for AC cable in cabinet? (cables = Incoming

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OK to use Y-splice for AC cable in cabinet? (cables = Incoming 120VAC, fan, storage drive)

Jason :

Hello. Welcome to Just

Jason :

Answer

Jason :

Can you elaborate on what you are trying to do? Do you have an adapter that has a single male end on it for input, and two female ends on it for output power?

Jason :

Basically, a splitter for 120 VAC?

Customer:

Power failover system for drives. An electrician built the harness with twist-nuts. We prefer a pigtail.

Jason :

Thank you for the additional information. I see no issues with the Y splitter you are looking to use, particularly if you already have a homemade version in use. It's a low amperage load, so you'll be fine.

Customer:

Hard question to frame... Is there any difference regarding which leg is the pigtail?

Jason :

I agree, that's a bit obscure. I'm not sure I understand. Are you able to post a photo?

Jason :

Oh, I think I understand. You can orient the adapter any way that works for you.

Customer:

the way it's built now: if ">-" represents the y-splice = Incoming 120VAC & fan lines form the ">", and line to storage drive forms the "-" of the splice.

Customer:

I'm wondering how much that matters. For example, could 120VAC form the "-" instead?

Jason :

One moment please...

Jason :

Sorry about that, had an unexpected phone call.

Jason :

As you likely have speculated, a splice is a splice. So it doesn't matter which leg is incoming, and which are outgoing.

Customer:

Beautiful. I appreciate your help! Have a good one.

Jason :

You are most welcome, and I appreciate the opportunity to help. Take care.

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Customer: replied 4 years ago.

One more question... I'm using 14AWG THHN wires. Do I need to cover them.

Hi AJ. First, let me thank you for the high rating, and the generous bonus.

Ideally, the THHN type wire needs to be covered. It's not allowed by Code to be used in exposed applications. However, if it's inside a rack in an IT setting, it's possible it would comply. I would like to see a photo of what you are up against, if you are able to post one.



Customer: replied 4 years ago.

I can't photo but it's inside a steel enclosure, runs between the outside enclosure wall and an inner cradle. (It's entirely possible that I am over-thinking this.) No user access to the inside of the cabinet without a hex driver.

 

If it's inside of a locked cabinet, it's actually what I would call a "gray area" relative to whether it's allowed by Code or not. However, with no use access, it's out of harm's way, so it's intrinsically safe, which is the terminology the Code uses to deem an installation safe. I don't think I would sweat it too much. If you had an electrician there, I'll assume the best... that he installed it in a safe and workmanlike manner.

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