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Dr. B.
Dr. B., Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 21249
Experience:  Hello, I am a small animal veterinarian and am happy to discuss any concerns & questions you have on any species.
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Type your Dog Veterinary question here My 4 year old Beagle

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My 4 year old Beagle is drinking a lot, panting for long minutes after some excitement and /or stress. Despite all this, he is very active and keen to get some exercise.He's a bit overweight He has hardly ever had raw meat. Could he be suffering from hyperthyroidism? Or diabetes?

Hello & welcome, I am Dr. B, a licensed veterinarian and I would like to help you today.

How long has he been showing signs?

Does he pass large urine volumes? Are they watery/dilute?

Is he loosing or gaining any weight since this started?

Are his gums pink or white/pale? Moist or sticky?

Could he have eaten anything harmful (ie plants, chemicals, human meds, etc)?

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
For a few weeks. He passes urine accordingly; when he drinks a lot, he'll pass more than usual. I haven't noticed much change in the consistency - quite yellowish usually. No noticeable weight loss or gain. His gums are pinkish, maybe a little paler pink and moist. I don't think he's eaten anything harmful. He sometimes chews the grass, but only a certain type.
What is worrying is that he pants so fast and for quite long when he's been excited or has done a bit of running with other dogs in the dog park.
One more thing: his eyes often seem to be producing some sticky tears(?), if that's the right way to describe it - that may well be some allergy to something esp. in the tall grass.

Hello again,

Now I do have to first note that hyperthyroidism (high thyroid hormone) tends to only be seen in cats, so it would be hypothyroidism (low) we'd have to consider. And while I agree it is a concern here, it isn't a very common issue for dogs as young as Frankie. Therefore, it would be on our differential list but before it we'd be suspicious of severe focal infection within the body (as it can elevate the thirst), diabetes, Cushing's or Addison's disease (both being hormonal conditions due to changes in the body's steroid levels), heart, liver or kidney troubles. And all can cause everything you have reported.

To get to the bottom of this, it would be worth having Frankie checked by his vet (if he is due for a vaccination soon, you could move it up a wee bit early and have him checked out at that time). The vet will be able to have a feel of him and just make sure there are no sinister lumps and bumps nor heart issues to blame for his signs. As well, you may consider having the vet check a blood or urine sample at this stage to give you an idea if his organs are in distress or if a hormonal issue is to blame for his signs.

Now in this situation, I would say that blood sample is ideal here. It would allow you to identify any organ dysfunction and would allow you to appreciate how severe it may be. As well, hormonal diseases like Cushings (or hypothyroidism) can give your vet hints that they are present on routine bloods (though determining how severe and therefore how much medication he requires may require a second blood sample to test for the hormone that is suspect). That said, a urine sample can be an economical and non-invasive means of ruling out some of our concerns. For example, urine can be tested in-house by the vet to check for signs of diabetes (ie. sugar in the urine), urinary based infection (ie bacteria, white blood cells --which can contribute to the signs), as well as check its specific gravity (how concentrated it is) that can tell us if there are problems with his kidneys lurking. And that can even be submitted without him visiting. Depending on the findings of your vet's exam and bloods/urine, you will be in a position to know which of these concerns are affecting him, how you can best address them, and what his long term prognosis may be.

Overall, I share your concern about Frankie's increased thirst and panting. Therefore, in this situation, it would be ideal to consider taking some steps with his vet to rule out and identify which of the above conditions are behind his abnormal signs. Because the sooner we can do so, the sooner we can treat him, get him comfortable, and back to normal.

Kind regards,

Dr. B.

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I aim to provide best care for you just as I do for my own clients & their pets. If you have any other questions, please ask – I’m happy to help but please rate me with the **STARS** (or leave a written rating of 1-5; 5 being great) as this is the only way I am credited for my work by the site & this allows me to continue to help here. This is included in your question fee. Once you rate, your question will not close & you can still ask follow-up questions. Thank you. : )**

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
Thanks for this ***** answer
So does this mean that his gum would turn paler and stickier if he was suffering from a severe condition of any of those you've listed. Since it is not abnormal, we can wait a few weeks (when he's due for a visit to the vet), is that right?

Hello again,

You are very welcome and I did mean to mention as well (had so much to say) that the sticky eyes is likely just a bit of secondary mild conjunctivitis which you can bathe away with sterile saline (ie OTC first aid eye wash, plain contact lens solution). In regards ***** ***** gums, they aren't a direct indicator for any of these per say but rule out a severe issue causing problems with circulation that could lead to collapse (ie severe heart failure, or him panting because of severe lung disease). As well, the gum moisture lets us assess hydration. So, its good these aren't abnormal as they can be signs of getting him seen right away. But in regards ***** ***** to have him seen, I'd not wait weeks but it would be ok (provided his status doesn't change) to wait until next week.

Best wishes,

Dr. B.

******************************************************************************

I aim to provide best care for you just as I do for my own clients & their pets. If you have any other questions, please ask – I’m happy to help but please rate me with the **STARS** (or leave a written rating of 1-5; 5 being great) as this is the only way I am credited for my work by the site & this allows me to continue to help here. This is included in your question fee. Once you rate, your question will not close & you can still ask follow-up questions. Thank you. : )**

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
Thanks again *****

You are very welcome, my dear.

All the best,

Dr. B.

Dr. B. and 3 other Dog Veterinary Specialists are ready to help you
Hi Eva,

I'm just following up on our conversation about Frankie. How is everything going?

Dr. B.