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Dr. B.
Dr. B., Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 20924
Experience:  Hello, I am a small animal veterinarian and am happy to discuss any concerns & questions you have on any species.
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On Monday, I took our boxer/lab to a groomer. She sheds a

Customer Question

On Monday, I took our boxer/lab to a groomer. She sheds a lot and I noticed she spent a lot of time licking her legs afterwards. The next day she became a little lethargic, but ate and drank well. Day three she slowed right down. Lots of sleep, doopy looking. Did not eat except a couple of milk bones and only drank a little. Really sad looking. When I threw a ball for her, she chased the first one, then started hacking. I thought she probably had a hair ball, but she also isn't drinking and does a lot of lip smacking and licking around her mouth. Ideas?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Dog Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 1 year ago.

Hello & welcome, I am Dr. B, a licensed veterinarian and I would like to help you with your wee one today.

Based on Coor's signs, we do have few concerns. If she was licking her legs a lot after her grooming visit (potentially due to a bit of razor burn), she could have essentially caused herself throat and GI irritation from any hair she has eaten. Otherwise, we'd have to be wary that she could have also picked up a respiratory or GI bug from the groomers.

With this all in mind, we can try some supportive care to see if we can get her eatin and drinking for us. First, since she has had a bit of hacking, you can try her with a mild cough suppressant. Commonly we will give a few millilitres of plain honey & glycerin cough syrup or plain honey. These can be given as often as needed. Or you could use Robitussin DM at a dose of 1 milligram per pound of body weight every 8 hours. Of course, do make sure to only use this and avoid any with pet toxic cold medications (ie acetaminophen, paracetamol, ibuprofen caffeine, alcohol, or pseudoephedrine).

Otherwise, we can take some steps to also settle her stomach, especially if she is lip smacking since that is a common nausea sign in the dog. To start, you can consider treating her with an antacid. Common pet safe OTC ones we can use include Pepcid (More Info/Dose @http://www.petplace.com/article/drug-library/library/over-the-counter/famotidine-pepcid) or Zantac (More Info/Dose @ http://www.petplace.com/article/drug-library/library/over-the-counter/ranitidine-hcl-zantac).Alternatively, to cover all bases, we could even give a small dose of Milk of Magnesia (0.5tsp every 8-12 hours). It will sooth her stomach but as a liquid, also help coat the throat. Whichever you choose, we’d give this 20 minutes before offering food to allow absorption. Of course, do check with her vet before use if she has any known health issues or is on any medications you didn’t mention. As well, if you try this and find her nausea too severe any of these down, then that is usually a red flag that we need her vet to bypass her mouth with injectable anti-vomiting medication.

Once that has had time to absorb and she is steadier on her stomach, you can consider tempting her on a light/easily digestible diet. Start with a small volume (a spoonful). Examples you can use are cooked white rice with boiled chicken, boiled white fish, cottage cheese, scrambled eggs, or meat baby food (as long as its garlic/onion free). There are also OTC vet diets that can be used (ie Hill’s I/D or Royal Canin’s sensitivity) too. When you offer that spoonful, give her 30 minutes to settle. If she keeps the food down, you can give a bit more and so on. As her stomach stabilizes, you can offer more. The aim of these diets is that it will be better tolerated and absorbed by the compromised gut. Therefore, it should get more nutrients in and result in less GI upset.

Overall, we do have a few concerns for Coor's sigs. It is quite possible that all her licking/grooming has lead to her irritating her throat and stomach. But we do also see them catch infections when in locations where other dogs frequent. So, we'd want to try the above just now. Of course,if she doesn't perk up in the next 12-24 hours or vomits; then we'd want to have a check with her vet to make sure she hasn't caught anything that may need antibiotics to clear.

All the best,

Dr. B.

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Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Thank you. I will look through my cupboards to see what I have on your list and try those first. I have high blood pressure, so don't keep a lot of cold medications either, but will see if one I do have one that would meet the specs. I do have honey, though, so will start there probably.
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 1 year ago.

You are very welcome,

Honey is a nice throat soothing option and would be a fine place to start. And if she doesnt' settle,then we can try an antacid.

Take care,

Dr. B.

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* Please remember to rate my service once you have all the information you need as this is how I am credited for assisting you today. Thank you! : )

Expert:  Dr. B. replied 1 year ago.
Hi,
I'm just following up on our conversation about Coors. How is everything going?
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