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Dr. Andy
Dr. Andy, Medical Director
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 30035
Experience:  UC Davis graduate, emphasis in dermatology, internal medicine, pain management
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My dog cant open his mouth properly. He was tested for masicatory

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My dog can't open his mouth properly. He was tested for masicatory myositis and was neg. What should I do next?
Welcome! I would be happy to assist you. I am a 2003 graduate from UC Davis and a Medical Director of a veterinarian practice.

Hello,
Well the masticatory myositis cannot be ruled-out, even with the test. I would ask your vet if doing a trial with steroids is still worthwhile.

Also, if there is some typeo of jaw or TMJ problem, it may be best to get into a veterinary dental specialist at least for an exam.

Dental Specialists

If not a dental specialist, at least a internist, since this is a very concerning, but difficult problem.

Find Various Specialists
--> Under "specialty" select SAIM = Small Animal Internal Medicine
--> Or, you can search for a Neurologist, Cardiologist or Oncologist

But, it does sound well worth still doing steroids just in case this is due to some autoimmune condition.

Hope that info helps
Dr. Andy


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Dr. Andy and 2 other Dog Veterinary Specialists are ready to help you
One other point.
I would confirm with your vet what test they performed. There are a few tests, and many have a lot of false positives or negatives.

The "2M antibody blood test" is the most accurate.

Dr. Andy


Please reply ANY time more information is needed using the REPLY TO EXPERT button.

Please remember to leave feedback by selecting a SMILEY FACE followed by “Submit”
This is necessary, so I may receive credit from the website for my response, even if you are a subscribing member.

Only rate my answer when you are 100% satisfied. IF you feel the need to rate "expected more" or "helped a little", please stop and reply to me via the REPLY TO EXPERT button. I would be happy to continue assisting further, and do everything I can to be of the greatest assistance.


REMEMBER: Even after you submit feedback, you can still review our discussion or reply if needed. Unfortunately, I cannot legally prescribe medications or offer a definitive diagnosis without performing a physical examination, which is necessary to establish a client-patient-doctor relationship. Any medical therapy and treatment should only be performed after an in-person examination with your veterinarian. While information may be discussed, this is not intended as an encouragement for you to self treat your pet.
After we conclude this question, I can be requested for additional questions through my profile at: Dr. Andy