Dog Veterinary

Ask a dog vet and get answers to your dog health questions

Ask a Dog Veterinarian,
Get an Answer ASAP!

what remedies are best for dogs with separation anxiety, leading…

Customer Question
what remedies are best for...
what remedies are best for dogs with separation anxiety, leading to whining and barking when owner is away?
also looking for best remedy for fear of being in a moving car.
thanks
Submitted: 6 years ago.Category: Dog Veterinary
Show More
Show Less
Ask Your Own Dog Veterinary Question
Answered in 1 hour by:
2/26/2012
Dog Veterinarian: aggieervet, Veterinarian replied 6 years ago
aggieervet
aggieervet, Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 663
Experience: Emergency veterinarian for 5 years and general practice veterinarian and owner for over 5 years.
Verified

aggieervet :

I'm a licensed vet and would liek to help you

aggieervet :

There is no simple treatment for separtion anxiety and it is almost always difficult to 'control/treat' without anti-anxiety medication from your vet

aggieervet :

It takes a lot of behavioral modification to treat and basically 're'-train' your dog how to 'behave' when you are gone. In order to do this, you have to first lower the anxiety level with drugs like reconcile or clomicalm

aggieervet :

It is also important to make sure your dog doesn't have any underlying problems making the behavioral problem worse - this is done by an exam and blood work at your vet

aggieervet :

Below is a copy fo the form I give to clients once we have ruled out other causes and start anti-anxiety medications

Separation Anxiety Treatment Protocol



During treatment for separation anxiety, it would be best not to allow your dog to experience anxiety during your departures. So, apart from the very defined and controlled training departures, your dog would not be left alone. Doggie day care or taking your dog to work are options for people that must work outside the home. If you are unable to avoid anxiety-ridden departures, you should make a clear distinction between “safe” training departures and other departures that will most probably evoke the anxiety. The most effective way to do this is to leave the dog in different locations for the training versus nontraining departures. Alternatively, a sound cue can be used to differentiate training from nontraining departures.




Most dogs become anxious as you go through preparations for departure. Therefore, you must work on desensitizing your pet to your predeparture cues. List your predeparture cues (e.g., pick up keys, put on shoes, etc.) that trigger anxiety in your pet. Then start to perform these randomly when you do not intend to leave. Do not overwhelm your dog to the point of eliciting anxiety; just do a few a day at an intensity level that your dog can handle.



Many dogs with separation anxiety are very attached to their owners. Making them more independent is a useful adjunct to the treatment plan. To increase your dog’s independence when you are home, do not allow your dog to follow you everywhere. For example, instead of sitting right next to you while you are relaxing at home, have the dog sit a few feet away from you. Or when you go up to go to the bathroom, don’t allow the dog to follow you. To achieve this gradual independence, you can use sit/stay commands, tie-downs (a leash attached to a sturdy piece of furniture), or close doors. The key is that you want to progress gradually enough so that you don’t elicit the anxious response from your dog. If you do happen to progress too rapidly and your dog exhibits anxiety, just return to a comfortable level and progress more gradually.




If you are using a crate during training departures, you first want to acclimate your dog to being in the crate when you are at home. Do one to two sessions per day. Start by putting your dog in the crate with a tasty treat and then sitting in the same room for a short period of time (a few minutes) perhaps reading a book. Release your dog from the crate. Gradually increase the duration of the sessions until your dog is comfortable in the crate for 30 minutes when you are in the room. Then start to leave the room, initially just for a very short period. Gradually increase the duration of your room departure until you can be elsewhere in the house for 30 minutes while your dog is comfortably resting in the crate. How quickly you progress will depend upon your dog. You do not want to elicit anxiety (panting, whining, barking, escape attempts, destruction, etc.) from your dog.




If crate training your dog is not possible, train your pet to settle and relax in a safe location. See the Tranquility Training Exercises handout for more details.




When you must leave, keep departures and returns low key. Ignore the dog for 5–10 minutes prior to ALL departures and whenever you return. Always take your dog out for an elimination opportunity prior to your departure.




Exercise is important for the health of any dog. Try to provide daily exercise for your dog, ideally prior to your departures.


On training departures only, present the dog with a new signal or cue or leave them in a novel location. This can be the radio or television left on, spraying air freshener, or ringing a bell. Always use the same signal on all planned departures.

Give the dog a delicious but long-lasting food item to consume in your absence. Toys stuffed with food work best.



Departure Desensitization: This is the critical part of the behavioral modification program. You need to start with short departures and gradually increase their length. A videotape of your dog during a departure can help you to see the length of departure that is “safe”—the amount of time that you can be absent before your dog starts to show signs of anxiety. Most dogs become anxious very shortly after the owner’s departure. When you start to actually leave the home, you should start with safe departure times and then gradually increase departure
length.

An example of a departure schedule is 1 minute, 1 minute, 1 minute, 3 minutes, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 4 minutes, 5 minutes, 5 minutes, 1 minute, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, etc. There is an occasional shorter departure so that your dog doesn’t start to anticipate your departure length. Of course, the departure schedule needs to be tailored to your dog.

You may find that your dog needs fewer or greater number of trials at each departure length. Usually, after you have successfully completed the first 30 minutes of departure, you can increase the departure lengths by greater increments (1 hour, 1 hour, 1.5 hours, 1.5 hours,2 hours, etc.). Remember that your dog can hear your car and knows if you have truly left. Even during the 4-minute departures, you will have to actually drive away! When your dog has achieved relaxation at a departure duration that is typical of your routine departures, your dog has successfully completed the program and should be left in the training departure location for your routine departures.



If at any time your dog exhibits anxiety or you return to find signs of destruction/elimination, then you have progressed too quickly. Return to a “safe” departure time and progress more gradually.


¡ Never punish your dog for behavior that has happened in your absence. This behavior is a result of anxiety, and punishment will probably make your pet more anxious.


¡ Vary the time of day that you practice planned departures.


¡ Progress through the schedule of planned departures gradually. Do not increase the time away in a regular progression and never increase the time if the dog has engaged in any separation-related behavior while you were gone.

Customer:

i am asking a specific question about homeopathy and my dog...i was led to believe i would get a response from a professional homeopath. it does not appear that you are a homeopath...please have a homeopath answer my question as that is what i paid for. thanks!

aggieervet :

the fear of being in a moving car is likely related to the same anxiety that caused the separation anxiety so can be 'treated' at the same time with similar types of steps with the medications

aggieervet :

No, you just selected vets in general and didn't specify for homeopathic. I will opt out of your questions and we will see if a homeopathic type vet answers your questions....good luck.....

Ask Your Own Dog Veterinary Question
Dog Veterinarian: Veterinarian101, Dog Veterinarian replied 6 years ago
Veterinarian101
Veterinarian101, Dog Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 1,083
Experience: Veterinarian with further qualifications in Animal Behavior. Knowledgable on dog behavior and health.
Verified
Hi,
I am not a homeopathic vet but I am a vet with further qualification in animal behavior. During my studies I researched homeopathic remedies for common problems such as separation anxiety and car travel anxiety.

Rescue remedy is the most frequently used homeopathic remedy. Place a couple of drops under your dogs tongue before leaving the house or car travel.

DAP or ADAPTIL collars produce a pheromone that has an excellent calming effect on anxious dogs. These are available from your vet.

Lavender also has calming qualities.

Hope this helps.
Ask Your Own Dog Veterinary Question
Customer reply replied 6 years ago
Thanks for your help, but I would love to talk to a homeopath specifically. I have tried the rescue remedy and it's good, but am looking for an actual homeopathic remedy for my dog.
thanks
Dog Veterinarian: Veterinarian101, Dog Veterinarian replied 6 years ago
Good luck!
Ask Your Own Dog Veterinary Question
Customer reply replied 6 years ago
Relist: Other.
I would specifically like to speak to a homeopath, or a homeopathic vet.
Dog Veterinarian: DrRalston, Dog Veterinarian replied 6 years ago
DrRalston
DrRalston, Dog Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 2,207
Experience: Over twelve years of internal medicine, surgery, and preventive care.
Verified
No treatment, homeopathic or otherwise will fix your problem by itself. You will need to do behavior modification as well. All of the Vets that have responded to you have given you excellent advice on that.

There are no homepathic trained Vets. There is not a separate school for this for Veterinary Medicine. There just isn't. We are trained classically, and then many of us incorporate homeopathy into our practice as complementary medicine. There are organizations of Veterinarians that have gone completely this route, but again I will remind you that their training is NO different from any other Veterinarian. They have done additional reading, and attended meetings at conference that are the same conferences that everyone else attends.

I do incorporate homeopathy into my practice, including essential oils.

For fear in general including the anxiety of separation and car rides, homepathic solutions that have been used include:

 

"The DAP diffuser releases a canine calming pheromone into the air. It plugs into a standard outlet, and for some dogs it does provide relief. Plug it into an area where the dog would be comfortable. There are no negative side effects from this product and thus it is definitely worth a try.

Homeopathic remedies can also offer some relief and have the advantage of generally being fast acting. Phosphorous in the strength of 30c can be dosed to be absorbed in the dogs mouth every 15 minutes until you see an effect. You can re-dose if you see the fear returning. The standard pill size that you find in health food stores is meant to be placed under a person’s tongue and held in the mouth. Since this is not practical for dogs, I find it best to crush the pill and then dump the powder into the dog’s mouth. This is best done without touching the pellet as homeopathy is energy medicine. All organic beings have their own energy and it is possible that you will make the remedy less effective by transferring your energy to it.

If the Phosphorous remedy doesn’t work, try Aconitum Napellus 30c for the next storm. Homeopathy will generally either work or not. Side effects or negative effects are generally not noted.

Flower essences are dilutions from botanicals used to treat a wide variety of emotional disturbances. Remedies need to be matched to the patient and can be mixed together. Again, this class of remedy should have no side effects. Rescue remedy or Five flower essence (depending on the company you use) is generally a good starting remedy to check for effect. Single remedies which are often helpful in thunderstorm fears include Rock Rose which works for terror and panic or Mimulus which is for fear of known things. You can dose these directly in the mouth or mix with water to administer. I generally use 2-6 drops to make up a dose, administered directly into the dog’s mouth. You can also add 5 drops or so to the dog’s drinking water two to three times daily to give some low level effect through thunderstorm season. Dose directly as needed in addition to this. The dosage in the water should be safe for all pets in the household."

 

From your knowledge and personal research into homeopathy, you will know that no homepathic medicine can be safely recommended to treat any disorder. This is an alternative route of traditional medicine that was founded in the 1800's by a German physician. It is important to know this is not a modern movement, but a movement that was started over 200 years ago before the age of modern medicine.

 

You might find this interesing : (click here for history of homeopathy)

So, there is yet another attempt to help.

DrRalston
DrRalston, Dog Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 2,207
Experience: Over twelve years of internal medicine, surgery, and preventive care.
Verified
DrRalston and 87 other Dog Veterinary Specialists are ready to help you
Ask your own question now
Was this answer helpful?

How JustAnswer works

step-image
Describe your issueThe assistant will guide you
step-image
Chat 1:1 with a dog veterinarianLicensed Experts are available 24/7
step-image
100% satisfaction guaranteeGet all the answers you need
Ask DrRalston Your Own Question
DrRalston
DrRalston
DrRalston, Dog Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 2,207
2,207 Satisfied Customers
Experience: Over twelve years of internal medicine, surgery, and preventive care.

DrRalston is online now

A new question is answered every 9 seconds

How JustAnswer works:

  • Ask an ExpertExperts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional AnswerVia email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site. Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction GuaranteeRate the answer you receive.

JustAnswer in the News:

Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com.
JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal questions from readers about layoffs, unemployment and severance.
Web sites like justanswer.com/legal
...leave nothing to chance.
Traffic on JustAnswer rose 14 percent...and had nearly 400,000 page views in 30 days...inquiries related to stress, high blood pressure, drinking and heart pain jumped 33 percent.
Tory Johnson, GMA Workplace Contributor, discusses work-from-home jobs, such as JustAnswer in which verified Experts answer people’s questions.
I will tell you that...the things you have to go through to be an Expert are quite rigorous.

What Customers are Saying:

It was so professional, so personally concerned (as we were) and you answered all of our questions. George and I are so happy that I found "JustAnswer" on my Google search -- you are now in my "Favorites" list! And, yes we do love our kitty - she makes our life complete!

Bev & GeorgeBoca Raton, FL

Wonderful service, prompt, efficient, and accurate. Couldn't have asked for more. I cannot thank you enough for your help.

Mary C.Freshfield, Liverpool, UK

This expert is wonderful. They truly know what they are talking about, and they actually care about you. They really helped put my nerves at ease. Thank you so much!!!!

AlexLos Angeles, CA

Thank you for all your help. It is nice to know that this service is here for people like myself, who need answers fast and are not sure who to consult.

GPHesperia, CA

I couldn't be more satisfied! This is the site I will always come to when I need a second opinion.

JustinKernersville, NC

Just let me say that this encounter has been entirely professional and most helpful. I liked that I could ask additional questions and get answered in a very short turn around.

EstherWoodstock, NY

Thank you so much for taking your time and knowledge to support my concerns. Not only did you answer my questions, you even took it a step further with replying with more pertinent information I needed to know.

RobinElkton, Maryland

< Previous | Next >

Meet the Experts:

Dr. Debbie

Dr. Debbie

Dog Veterinarian

904 satisfied customers

Companion animal veterinarian practicing for over 10 years.

Dr. Andy

Dr. Andy

Medical Director

16,499 satisfied customers

UC Davis graduate, emphasis in dermatology, internal medicine, pain management

Dr Scott Nimmo

Dr Scott Nimmo

Dog Veterinarian

10,818 satisfied customers

BVMS, MRCVS. { Glasgow UK }

Dr. Gary

Dr. Gary

Dog Veterinarian

10,089 satisfied customers

DVM, Emergency Veterinarian, BS (Physiology)

Dr. Bruce

Dr. Bruce

Veterinarian

9,808 satisfied customers

15 years of experience as a small animal veterinarian

Dr. Scott

Dr. Scott

Veterinarian

9,615 satisfied customers

15 years of small animal, equine and pocket pet medicine and surgery.

Rebecca

Rebecca

Dog Veterinarian

8,947 satisfied customers

More than 30 years of companion animal practice.

< Previous | Next >

Related Dog Veterinary Questions
My puppy has been acting up since my fiancée left last week.
My puppy has been acting up since my fiancée left last week. She used to be so calm and cuddly. She loved her crate. She slept so well. Now she howls and cries so so so high pitch and sharp and loud I… read more
Dr. Meghan Denney
Dr. Meghan Denney
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine
1,983 satisfied customers
Our new dog, Dolly, is a rescue. She is wonderful in every
Our new dog, Dolly, is a rescue. She is wonderful in every way, except she barks at every dog she sees from the Windows in our house. We have had some success telling her to be quiet and she usually b… read more
Dr. Meghan Denney
Dr. Meghan Denney
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine
1,983 satisfied customers
My dog has separation anxiety and idk what to do I had to
My dog has separation anxiety and idk what to do I had to have a friend take care of her temp. and she is freaking out and idk what to do … read more
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy
Veterinary Nurse
Associate Degree
11,259 satisfied customers
9 /10 year old tiny(3.5kg) silky terrier. Rescued from puppy
9 /10 year old tiny(3.5kg) silky terrier. Rescued from puppy mill, barks constantly all day and at any noise when we are home at night. What would be the most effective but kindest way to stop the bar… read more
Dr. Gene
Dr. Gene
Veterinarian, Chief of Staff
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
1,975 satisfied customers
Hi my name is Linda. I recently moved from NY suburbs to a
Hi my name is Linda. I recently moved from NY suburbs to a MN city condo with my dog and cat. My dog, Ben the Beagle, is having severe seperation anxiety and won't allow me to leave my house even for … read more
Dr. Michael Salkin
Dr. Michael Salkin
Veterinarian
DVM
3 satisfied customers
my dog has become very afraid of the house. he stares into
my dog has become very afraid of the house. he stares into the air and sniffs the air, puts his tail between his legs, sometimes he will look at me like he is afraid of me. he acts like he took a hit … read more
Dr. Michael Salkin
Dr. Michael Salkin
Veterinarian
DVM
3 satisfied customers
Lab mix: adopted..barks..left alone..rescue adoption and he is getting
Our 8 year old adopted Lab mix barks when left alone in the house during the day. He is a rescue adoption and he is getting more secure as time goes on. We have had him for about four months now. I th… read more
DrRalston
DrRalston
Dog Veterinarian
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
2,207 satisfied customers
My dog has seperation anxiety. I have been working with him
My dog has seperation anxiety. I have been working with him for 3 months. I adopted him from a shelter when he was just 1 year old. He seems to be slightly better...very slightly. I have tried natural… read more
Dr. Michael Salkin
Dr. Michael Salkin
Veterinarian
DVM
3 satisfied customers
BICHON: SEPARATION ANXIETY..SHE BARKS NONSTOP..AWAY AND SCRATCHES AT
I HAVE A 13 YO BICHON WHO HAS DEVELOPED WHAT APPEARS SEPARATION ANXIETY. SHE BARKS NONSTOP WHEN I AM AWAY AND SCRATCHES AT THE DOOR/GATE WHAT HAVE YOU TO ESCAPE. I HAVE DECIDED TO LEAVE HER IN THE BED… read more
DrRalston
DrRalston
Dog Veterinarian
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
2,207 satisfied customers
My MinPin suffers separation anxiety and barks excessively
My MinPin suffers separation anxiety and barks excessively when left alone in the house. What is the best course of treatment? She is six years old and otherwise healthy.… read more
Dr. Drew
Dr. Drew
Emergency/Critical Care Veterinarian
Doctoral Degree
9,712 satisfied customers
A couple of weeks ago my mom and I picked up a stray dog. She
A couple of weeks ago my mom and I picked up a stray dog. She was the most well behaved dog (in the car) my mom and I have ever seen. When we got her home though she barks constantly when she is not u… read more
Dr. Lee
Dr. Lee
Veterinarian
Doctoral Degree
4,959 satisfied customers
golden retriever: mth old..old male..freaking out and whining
I have two issues going on with my 7 mth old male golden retriever. He's ever since he was a pup traveled constantly in my suv and sometimes put his head out window as I drive but the other day on the… read more
Dr. John
Dr. John
Veterinarian
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
5,053 satisfied customers
I have a 9 yo Bichon that usually barks when someone nears
I have a 9 yo Bichon that usually barks when someone nears my door. That is acceptable, but he whines when traveling in the car. We recently purchased a travel trailer and when we go somewhere we can'… read more
Dr. Loretta
Dr. Loretta
Large and small animal Veterinarian
Doctoral Degree
22,387 satisfied customers
My rat terrier is agressive barking and growling at people,
My rat terrier is agressive barking and growling at people, dogs, cars. I I know its anxiety d/t fear...what can be done? Thanks… read more
andrea roberts
andrea roberts
veterinary surgeon
Bachelor's Degree
1,292 satisfied customers
When my 6month old puppy comes out of being in her crate for
When my 6month old puppy comes out of being in her crate for a few hours, she is soaking wet. Her chest and legs especially. She is not urinating in the crate but I'm not sure exactly what it is she i… read more
Dr. Rogers
Dr. Rogers
Associate Veterinarian
Doctoral Degree
123 satisfied customers
I have a year old pitbull and I was wondering what can I do
I have a year old pitbull and I was wondering what can I do to make him stop chewing up everything I cant leave nothing around I have to even put his bed up when I leave the house cause he then chewed… read more
Matt_DVM
Matt_DVM
Associate Veterinarian
Doctoral Degree
188 satisfied customers
Our golden/ lab mix has always slept on his pillow since a
Our golden/ lab mix has always slept on his pillow since a pup (he's 6 now) & we had no problems until a month ago when we returned from a 2 week trip & had a couple stay at our house with him. Ever s… read more
smanimalvet
smanimalvet
Veterinarian
Doctoral Degree
873 satisfied customers
Beagle: my 5yr old..neighborhood with his barking at cars coming
need options. my 5yr old Beagle is annoying the neighborhood with his barking at cars coming up the roadway. When I am home I can pretty much stop him by bringing him inside or yelling at him. however… read more
Dr. Gene
Dr. Gene
Veterinarian, Chief of Staff
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
1,975 satisfied customers
Disclaimer: Information in questions, answers, and other posts on this site ("Posts") comes from individual users, not JustAnswer; JustAnswer is not responsible for Posts. Posts are for general information, are not intended to substitute for informed professional advice (medical, legal, veterinary, financial, etc.), or to establish a professional-client relationship. The site and services are provided "as is" with no warranty or representations by JustAnswer regarding the qualifications of Experts. To see what credentials have been verified by a third-party service, please click on the "Verified" symbol in some Experts' profiles. JustAnswer is not intended or designed for EMERGENCY questions which should be directed immediately by telephone or in-person to qualified professionals.

Disclaimer: Information in questions, answers, and other posts on this site ("Posts") comes from individual users, not JustAnswer; JustAnswer is not responsible for Posts. Posts are for general information, are not intended to substitute for informed professional advice (medical, legal, veterinary, financial, etc.), or to establish a professional-client relationship. The site and services are provided "as is" with no warranty or representations by JustAnswer regarding the qualifications of Experts. To see what credentials have been verified by a third-party service, please click on the "Verified" symbol in some Experts' profiles. JustAnswer is not intended or designed for EMERGENCY questions which should be directed immediately by telephone or in-person to qualified professionals.

Show MoreShow Less

Ask Your Question

x