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Dr Scott Nimmo
Dr Scott Nimmo, Dog Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 20743
Experience:  BVMS, MRCVS. { Glasgow UK }
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My 3 pound dog ate my prescription ativan 2 mg. She weighs

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My 3 pound dog ate my prescription ativan 2 mg. She weighs 3 pounds. What do i do. She is asleep now.5 min? Help?
Thanks for the question.

I will be very pleased to try and answer your question but to enable me to do so with accuracy I need to know a little bit more information, so first can you tell me :

1. When did this happen?

This is just a information request for which you have not been charged, I am online at present. I will answer your question shortly after receiving your reply.

Scott Nimmo BVMS MRCVS
Customer: replied 6 years ago.
She ate it about 5 min. Ago?
Thanks for the quick reply,

1. The amount of ativan your dog took is clearly an overdose but you have time { up to one hour } to recover it by inducing vomiting, the sooner the better. For the sake of speed I will give you a link on how to do this best : LINK

2. If you are sure you have recovered the tablet by inducing vomiting then all well and good, if not then you should contact an ER vet as soon as possible.

If I have not covered your question fully enough or you would like to ask more I will be online for the next hour or so and I will be at your disposal.

Scott Nimmo BVMS MRCVS
Dr Scott Nimmo and other Dog Veterinary Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 6 years ago.
How do i do that. I could not open the link.
Hello again,

I have just tried the link, it is open from my end but below is a cut and paste from it.

.....................................................

Frequently, dogs ingest items, chemicals or foods that have the potential to be dangerous or even toxic. If you see this ingestion, you may be able to avoid the potential danger by making your dog vomit.

Inducing vomiting should be done only if instructed by your veterinarian. The procedure can be hazardous. We strongly encourage you to contact your family veterinarian or local veterinary emergency center for advice regarding the appropriateness of inducing vomiting for each specific incident. The item or substance ingested, the time and amount of ingestion, as well as the overall health of your dog should be considered prior to recommending the induction of vomiting.

Methods to Induce Vomiting

# XXXXX Peroxide

Three percent hydrogen peroxide is quite effective in making dogs and cats vomit. You must be sure to use three percent peroxide and not hair coloring strength peroxide.

Despite the label indicating that hydrogen peroxide is toxic, it is safe to give to dogs for this purpose. It is considered toxic since it induces vomiting and therefore does not stay in the body.

The appropriate dose of hydrogen peroxide is one teaspoon per 10 pounds of body weight. If you have an oral syringe, one teaspoon equals 5 cc or 5 ml. Once given, walk your dog around or gently shake the stomach area to mix the peroxide with the stomach contents. Vomiting should occur within 15 to 20 minutes. If no vomiting occurs, you can safely repeat the three percent hydrogen peroxide once. If it is still not effective, your dog may need to be seen by a veterinarian for stronger vomiting medication.

Once the hydrogen peroxide is given, it is important to watch your pet so that he does not re-ingest the substance. If there is concern about toxicity, collect and take a sample of the vomitus to your veterinarian.

.......................................

Regards,

Scott
Dr Scott Nimmo and other Dog Veterinary Specialists are ready to help you
Hello again,

I have just tried the link, it is open from my end but below is a cut and paste from it. .....................................................

Frequently, dogs ingest items, chemicals or foods that have the potential to be dangerous or even toxic. If you see this ingestion, you may be able to avoid the potential danger by making your dog vomit. Inducing vomiting should be done only if instructed by your veterinarian. The procedure can be hazardous. We strongly encourage you to contact your family veterinarian or local veterinary emergency center for advice regarding the appropriateness of inducing vomiting for each specific incident.

The item or substance ingested, the time and amount of ingestion, as well as the overall health of your dog should be considered prior to recommending the induction of vomiting.

Methods to Induce Vomiting # XXXXX Peroxide Three percent hydrogen peroxide is quite effective in making dogs and cats vomit. You must be sure to use three percent peroxide and not hair coloring strength peroxide. Despite the label indicating that hydrogen peroxide is toxic, it is safe to give to dogs for this purpose. It is not considered toxic since it induces vomiting and therefore does not stay in the body.

The appropriate dose of hydrogen peroxide is one teaspoon per 10 pounds of body weight. If you have an oral syringe, one teaspoon equals 5 cc or 5 ml. Once given, walk your dog around or gently shake the stomach area to mix the peroxide with the stomach contents. Vomiting should occur within 15 to 20 minutes. If no vomiting occurs, you can safely repeat the three percent hydrogen peroxide once. If it is still not effective, your dog may need to be seen by a veterinarian for stronger vomiting medication. Once the hydrogen peroxide is given, it is important to watch your pet so that he does not re-ingest the substance. If there is concern about toxicity, collect and take a sample of the vomitus to your veterinarian

. .......................................

Regards,

Scott