Cat Veterinary

Have Cat Questions? Ask a Cat Vet Online.

Ask a Cat Veterinarian,
Get an Answer ASAP!

Cat Veterinary

Cat is a 10 yr old cat who never has been sick, wednesday 7/19 she started laying under the bed and stop eating and

Customer Question
She is a 10 yr...
She is a 10 yr old cat who never has been sick, wednesday 7/19 she started laying under the bed and stop eating and moving her bowels, she did urinate Friday 7/21, she does not want to eat except for a small treats we give her. She went to the doctor but they only found some pain in her knee, then we went again, they drew blood but it seems most of all was ok. Only a little fever. They gave her an IV, some antibiotics, vitamin 12 shot and send her home. she still lies under the bed without eating, does not drink water only through a syringe. she seems ok when you look at her, but she only lays there, she bathed herself a bit today. what do you think?
JA: I'll do all I can to help. It could be an infection. The Veterinarian will know what to do. What is the cat's name?
Customer: Lilly
JA: Is there anything else the Veterinarian should be aware of about Lilly?
Customer: she was bored with a bad front paw, but she uses it to walk on her beaded leg and bathes herself with it. she has a small belly, she weights 12.5 lbs.
Submitted: 4 months ago.Category: Cat Veterinary
Show More
Show Less
Ask Your Own Cat Veterinary Question
Customer reply replied 4 months ago
SHE HAS STOPPED TO MEOU WHEN I GO TO LIFT HER, I CALL HER NAME SHE LOOKS AT ME THEN CONTINUES SLEEPING LAYING ON A SMALL MATTRESS ON THE FLOOR. IT DOES NOT SHOW AN INTENTION OF GOING TO HER BOX.
Customer reply replied 4 months ago
I HAVE BEEN WAITING 45 MINUTES??
Customer reply replied 4 months ago
11PM TODAY SHE JUST WENT TO THE BOX TO URINATE
Answered in 1 day by:
7/25/2017
Cat Veterinarian: Dr. Meghan Denney, Cat Veterinarian replied 4 months ago
Dr. Meghan Denney
Dr. Meghan Denney, Cat Veterinarian
Category: Cat Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 1,485
Experience: Veterinarian at Kingsland Blvd Animal Clinic
Verified

Hi I am Dr. Denney. I am currently reviewing your post now. Please give me a few minutes to type my response. Thank you for trusting us with your question. This service is used for general information only and is no substitute for a veterinarian patient relationship by examination.

I apologize for the delay in someone getting to your question. The site may have glitched which can occur sometimes,but I do apologize. How is Lilly today?

Did your veterinarian check any blood work on her?

Ask Your Own Cat Veterinary Question
Customer reply replied 4 months ago
I am still no satisfied with this type of answer, really what does it helps with my cat 's problem?
Cat Veterinarian: Dr. Meghan Denney, Cat Veterinarian replied 4 months ago

It was not an answer it was requesting additional information so I can give you an answer.

Ask Your Own Cat Veterinary Question
Cat Veterinarian: Dr. Meghan Denney, Cat Veterinarian replied 4 months ago

How is she doing today ? Is she still the same or are there improvements?

Ask Your Own Cat Veterinary Question
Cat Veterinarian: Dr. Meghan Denney, Cat Veterinarian replied 4 months ago

If she is not showing any improvements then I would recommend getting imaging done on her abdomen to see if there is an issue in an organ system that did not show on the blood work. An ultrasound would be my first choice as it will pick up blockages, inflammation in the liver, pancreas or kidney or stones in the bladder.

I would also recommend ( if she is not feeling better today) that tomorrow we get her back in and hospitalize her on IV fluids and medications to help her through this.

Something is obviously wrong and to get the answer we need more diagnostics and to get more aggressive with therapies to help her.

Ask Your Own Cat Veterinary Question
Cat Veterinarian: Dr. Meghan Denney, Cat Veterinarian replied 4 months ago

This could be pancreatitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and unfortunately this could also be cancer.

Imaging will help us get closer to, or be able to make a diagnosis.

Ask Your Own Cat Veterinary Question
Cat Veterinarian: Dr. Meghan Denney, Cat Veterinarian replied 4 months ago

Pancreatitis is potentially a metabolic disaster. Here’s why:

The normal pancreas has a number of safeguards in place to keep its digestive enyzmes securely stored. If these enzymes escape and become active, they will digest the body! This is exactly what happens when the pancreas gets inflamed: the enzymes escape, become inappropriately activated, and begin digesting the pancreas itself. The living tissue becomes further inflamed and the tissue damage quickly involves the adjacent liver. Toxins released from this orgy of tissue destruction are released into the circulation and can cause a body-wide inflammatory response. If the pancreas is affected enough so as to disrupt its ability to produce insulin, diabetes mellitus can result; this can be either temporary or permanent.

Complications

Certain disasters complicating pancreatitis include disrupting surfactants in the lung tissue that normally keep the tiny air-filled alveoli from collapsing after each exhaled breath. Without surfactants, the alveoli close up and respiratory failure results.

Also, fats throughout the body are destroyed in an effect called the Weber-Christian syndrome.

Pancreatitis is one of the chief risk factors for the development of what is called disseminated intravascular coagulation, or DIC, which is basically a massive uncoupling of normal blood clotting and clot dissolving mechanisms. This leads to abnormal simultaneous bleeding and clotting of blood throughout the body.

Pancreatic encephalopathy (brain damage) can occur if the fats protecting the central nervous system become digested.

Fortunately, total disasters such as the above are rare
but be aware that the potential for such disasters exists
should the pancreatic inflammation get out of hand.
Most of the time, pancreatitis is confined to the area of the liver and pancreas.

  • Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic (acute cases can reverse completely).
  • Pancreatitis can be mild or severe (acute cases tend to be more severe and mild cases may not even require treatment).

What Causes Pancreatitis in Cats?

Unfortunately, 90% of the time we never find out. We have some idea of possible risk factors, though.

  • Trauma (getting hit by a car or falling from a great height)
  • An active feline distemper infection
  • Toxoplasma (a parasite) infection can involve the pancreas, although it almost always involves other tissues as well
  • There may be an association with pancreatitis and inflammatory bowel disease. The theory is that the abnormal intestinal disease leads to an overgrowth of bacteria. These bacteria are able to crawl up the pancreatic duct and cause infection in the pancreas.
  • Organophosphate insecticide exposure. Organophosphates are not commonly used in flea control any more but they are readily available in hardware and garden stores. They are also in some flea collars.
  • Use of drugs; drugs have certainly caused pancreatitis in humans and dogs but have not been proven to have done so in cats. Still, with a cat with a history of pancreatitis, it is prudent to avoid drugs that have been associated with pancreatic inflammation. Such drugs include azathioprine (an immune suppressive agent); thiazide diuretics, (furosemide); tetracycline (an antibiotic); valproic acid (a seizure control agent); and procainamide (a heart medicine).

Chances are the cause for a given case will never be revealed.

If your Cat has Pancreatitis, what might you Observe at Home?

In dogs and humans, this condition is associated with a lot of nausea and abdominal pain. According to one recent study in cats, though, only 35% of cats with pancreatitis showed vomiting and only 25% appeared to have abdominal pain. Fever is a possible sign but often the temperature will drop instead. Lethargy and appetite loss are consistent signs. Nearly all cats with pancreatitis lose their appetites, and about half of them will have been affected long enough to show weight loss.

Approximately 40% of cats with hepatic lipidosis have pancreatitis as the underlying cause.
Hepatic lipidosis represents a specific type of liver failure that stems from appetite loss/inadequate calorie intake and complicates pancreatitis tremendously.

Making the Diagnosis

The diagnosis of pancreatitis has been made substantially simpler with the development of the SPEC-FPL test, which stands for Specific Feline Pancreatic Lipase. This test can be run as an in-house test kit that yields a positive or negative result in minutes, or it can be performed at IDEXX reference labs to yield an actual numeric value for more accurate monitoring. This test is based on the Pancreatic Lipase Immunoreactivity (PLI) test, which is available only at certain veterinary university diagnostic laboratories. Lipase is one of the pancreatic digestive enzymes and small traces are normally in the circulation. These levels jump dramatically during pancreatitis and thus the diagnosis can be made non-invasively without the expense of ultrasound. This form of testing is actually more sensitive than ultrasound, which means it can pick up pancreatitis in a milder state.

Of course, pancreatitis can be diagnosed on ultrasound as the inflamed pancreas becomes swollen and exhibits texture changes typical of inflammation. Pancreatitis can also be diagnosed by biopsy during surgical exploration as well though there is controversy as to whether removing a piece of pancreas actually generates additional inflammation. The advantage of surgical exploration, however, is that other organs can be sampled to get a more complete picture of what is happening in the abdomen.

The SPEC-FPL test has become a common addition to basic feline blood work and its elevation is commonly picked up in cats with no symptoms. The significance of this suggests (but does not necessarily confirm) an unhealthy bowel population has overgrown and is either elaborating material that is inflaming the pancreas or has actually invaded the pancreas. If the cat genuinely has no symptoms, treatment is not necessary; however, it may be prudent to consider a hypoallergenic diet or the addition of probiotics (live cultures of beneficial bacteria) to the food to assist in recolonizing the bowel into a healthier microbe community.

How is the Cat Treated?

There are three parts to treatment: removing the cause of the pancreatitis (this is usually not possible since the cause is only rarely known), general support and symptomatic relief through the inflammatory crisis, and monitoring and instituting protection against the disastrous complications listed above. Intravenous fluid therapy is used to support the pancreatic vasculature and combat any dehydration from vomiting or diarrhea. This simple act of perfusing the pancreas enables damaging inflammatory biochemicals to be flushed away and healing to begin.

Medicines are used to control pain and nausea. In the dog, high fat diets are important predisposing factors for pancreatitis but this appears not to be true for cats. Pre-existing inflammatory bowel disease seems to bear more feline relevance so treatment in that direction seems more appropriate (steroids, antacids, low residue diets or hypoallergenic diets). Anecdotally, digestive enzyme supplementations are felt to be helpful in some cases. In the past, food restriction was included in treatment to rest the sensitive pancreas but newer thinking is that the entire GI tract heals faster when food is passing through it.

A Note on Vitamin B12

The healthy pancreas manufactures a substance called intrinsic factor that is necessary for the absorption of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) from the diet. The unhealthy pancreas does not make enough intrinsic factor, and deficiency ensues when pancreatitis becomes chronic. This leads to an unthrifty and often anemic cat. Since dietary B12 cannot be absorbed, the only solution is to provide B12 by injection, usually at home, once or twice a week and periodically thereafter. Vitamin B12 levels can be tested to determine if supplements are needed; or, since the injections are relatively inexpensive and have a broad safety margin, sometimes they are simply prescribed without testing.

Prognosis

How the cat does in the long run depends on how severely ill he or she is. If the cat survives the episode of acute pancreatitis, there is a good chance that he or she will live a normal life thereafter. However, chronic cases of pancreatitis may wax and wane for years, requiring a permanent diet change and chronic medication administration.

Ask Your Own Cat Veterinary Question
Cat Veterinarian: Dr. Meghan Denney, Cat Veterinarian replied 4 months ago

The best recommendation I can make for Lilly is that she needs to get some imaging done so we can try and find the cause of these symptoms and then she needs to be hospitalized so we can get her hydrated and get IV medications on board.

Ask Your Own Cat Veterinary Question
Ask Dr. Gary Your Own Question
Dr. Gary
Dr. Gary
Dr. Gary, Cat Veterinarian
Category: Cat Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 3,924
3,924 Satisfied Customers
Experience: DVM, Emergency Veterinarian, BS (Physiology)

Dr. Gary is online now

A new question is answered every 9 seconds

How JustAnswer works:

  • Ask an ExpertExperts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional AnswerVia email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site. Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction GuaranteeRate the answer you receive.

JustAnswer in the News:

Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com.
JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal questions from readers about layoffs, unemployment and severance.
Web sites like justanswer.com/legal
...leave nothing to chance.
Traffic on JustAnswer rose 14 percent...and had nearly 400,000 page views in 30 days...inquiries related to stress, high blood pressure, drinking and heart pain jumped 33 percent.
Tory Johnson, GMA Workplace Contributor, discusses work-from-home jobs, such as JustAnswer in which verified Experts answer people’s questions.
I will tell you that...the things you have to go through to be an Expert are quite rigorous.

What Customers are Saying:

It was so professional, so personally concerned (as we were) and you answered all of our questions. George and I are so happy that I found "JustAnswer" on my Google search -- you are now in my "Favorites" list! And, yes we do love our kitty - she makes our life complete!

Bev & GeorgeBoca Raton, FL

Wonderful service, prompt, efficient, and accurate. Couldn't have asked for more. I cannot thank you enough for your help.

Mary C.Freshfield, Liverpool, UK

This expert is wonderful. They truly know what they are talking about, and they actually care about you. They really helped put my nerves at ease. Thank you so much!!!!

AlexLos Angeles, CA

Thank you for all your help. It is nice to know that this service is here for people like myself, who need answers fast and are not sure who to consult.

GPHesperia, CA

I couldn't be more satisfied! This is the site I will always come to when I need a second opinion.

JustinKernersville, NC

Just let me say that this encounter has been entirely professional and most helpful. I liked that I could ask additional questions and get answered in a very short turn around.

EstherWoodstock, NY

Thank you so much for taking your time and knowledge to support my concerns. Not only did you answer my questions, you even took it a step further with replying with more pertinent information I needed to know.

RobinElkton, Maryland

< Previous | Next >

Meet the Experts:

Dr. Gary

Dr. Gary

Cat Veterinarian

3,924 satisfied customers

DVM, Emergency Veterinarian, BS (Physiology)

Dr. Andy

Dr. Andy

Medical Director

4,739 satisfied customers

UC Davis graduate, Interests: Dermatology, Internal Medicine, Pain Management

Dr. Bruce

Dr. Bruce

Veterinarian

4,343 satisfied customers

15 years of experience as a small animal veterinarian

Dr. Scott

Dr. Scott

Veterinarian

3,998 satisfied customers

15 years of small animal, equine and pocket pet experience in medicine and surgery.

Rebecca

Rebecca

Cat Veterinarian

3,330 satisfied customers

More than 30 years of companion animal practice.

Dr. Drew

Dr. Drew

Cat Veterinarian

3,070 satisfied customers

Small Animal Medicine and Surgery

Dr. Deb

Dr. Deb

Cat Veterinarian

2,834 satisfied customers

I have been a practicing veterinarian for over 30 years.

< Previous | Next >

Related Cat Veterinary Questions
She is diabetic, but her levels are not coming down, she has
She is diabetic, but her levels are not coming down, she has solid tummy and vet thinks could be something to do with the pancreas … read more
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy
Veterinary Nurse
Associate Degree
8,629 satisfied customers
I have a 15 year old cat with diabetics I was giving him a
I have a 15 year old cat with diabetics I was giving him a very small amount of insulin and decided to stop after a couple of months. Nothing has changed except he does drink a lot and pees a good amo… read more
Dr. Alleyne
Dr. Alleyne
Veterinary associate
Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine
1,049 satisfied customers
He has diarrhea. He hasn't had food since tester around 4pm.
He has diarrhea. He hasn't had food since tester around 4pm. The diahreah has slowed but his behind is still red and swollen. I trying to see what we can put on him. … read more
DocPaul
DocPaul
Doctoral Degree
664 satisfied customers
Shes has had diarrhea for about a week now. Diarrhea for
no blood in stool just haven't been able to fix the diarrhea issue… read more
Dr. Bruce
Dr. Bruce
Veterinarian
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
4,343 satisfied customers
Diabetic cat, 8yrs old, recent diagnosis but may have had
diabetic cat, 8yrs old, recent diagnosis but may have had diabetes for a year or more. Recent drinking a lot of water caused us to have him tested. We started him on 1U of insulin twice a day, now aft… read more
Dr. Nicole
Dr. Nicole
Veterinarian
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
237 satisfied customers
She is diabetic. she normally just eats her food and goes to
she is diabetic. she normally just eats her food and goes to bed she ate all her food but now she is walking around sniffing everything … read more
Dr. B.
Dr. B.
Veterinary Degree (BVMS)
3,439 satisfied customers
He's kidneys are failing. Is there anything I can do?
He's kidneys are failing. Is there anything I can do? Looking for a miracle. … read more
Dr. Michael Salkin
Dr. Michael Salkin
Veterinarian
DVM
3 satisfied customers
Garfield has diabetes and kidney disease. He was receiving
Garfield has diabetes and kidney disease. He was receiving fluids but did not have any for 10-12 day. Then he was given about 1 1/2 or 2. He does not seem to feel well. He is not eating but he has had… read more
Dr. Denise
Dr. Denise
Veterinarian
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
354 satisfied customers
13 year old cat diagnosed with diabetes (caught pretty
13 year old cat diagnosed with diabetes (caught pretty early), was on a too-high carb diet. We're transitioning to low-carb, wet food. How soon after going on the low carb food should we test to deter… read more
Rebecca
Rebecca
Cat Veterinarian
Doctoral Degree
3,330 satisfied customers
Diabetic and the treatment is costly. Looking for canned
Diabetic and the treatment is costly. Looking for canned foods, and insulin, etc. that is less expensive. … read more
Scott Perry
Scott Perry
Veterinarian
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
1,252 satisfied customers
Our cat was diagnosed with kidney disease that can be
Our cat was diagnosed with kidney disease that can be treated with special food. She might have arthritis. She needs a few teeth pulled. Recently she's not as social. Her weight is stable. She's shedd… read more
Dr Scott Nimmo
Dr Scott Nimmo
337 satisfied customers
My cat is diabetic and on 5 units of Lantus SoloStar am and
My cat is diabetic and on 5 units of Lantus SoloStar am and 5 units p.m. He's developed diarrhea in last three days, but still eating and drinking water. I feed him wet canned food and leave out dry f… read more
Dr. John
Dr. John
Veterinarian
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
5,046 satisfied customers
Cat has bad diarrhea & vomiting. Have not changed food or
Cat has bad diarrhea & vomiting. Have not changed food or treats. What can I Give him? … read more
Dr. B.
Dr. B.
Veterinary Degree (BVMS)
3,439 satisfied customers
My cat was recently diagnosed with diabetes. I've switched
My cat was recently diagnosed with diabetes. I've switched his food to a low carb wet food and he gets insulin 2x/day. I forgot to give him insulin last nite and now this morning he is lethargic and w… read more
Rebecca
Rebecca
Cat Veterinarian
Doctoral Degree
3,330 satisfied customers
Chronic diarrhea for 8.5 years. Liver, kidney, and thyroid
chronic diarrhea for 8.5 years. Liver, kidney, and thyroid test okay, he's had full blood work ups, ultrasound, and surgical investigation, everything comes up normal, but his diarrhea is horrible sme… read more
divealot1
divealot1
DVM
6 satisfied customers
If diabetes and kidney problems ruled out by vet but he did
if diabetes and kidney problems ruled out by vet but he did have respiratory problem and got antibiotics. on next visit, what would be next test to do if he has 6 of 8 symptons on your list of pancrea… read more
Rebecca
Rebecca
Cat Veterinarian
Doctoral Degree
3,330 satisfied customers
Are there better food options for cats with kidney stones?
Are there better food options for cats with kidney stones ? She hates the Hills food and has lost weight... … read more
Brittany Hale
Brittany Hale
Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine
12 satisfied customers
My cat has kidney issues is underweight and is NOT diabetic.
my cat has kidney issues is underweight and is NOT diabetic. we were recommended food from Purina called Diatetic Management. After giving her this food she's had two seizures. Could this be caused by… read more
Dr. Bruce
Dr. Bruce
Veterinarian
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
4,343 satisfied customers
Disclaimer: Information in questions, answers, and other posts on this site ("Posts") comes from individual users, not JustAnswer; JustAnswer is not responsible for Posts. Posts are for general information, are not intended to substitute for informed professional advice (medical, legal, veterinary, financial, etc.), or to establish a professional-client relationship. The site and services are provided "as is" with no warranty or representations by JustAnswer regarding the qualifications of Experts. To see what credentials have been verified by a third-party service, please click on the "Verified" symbol in some Experts' profiles. JustAnswer is not intended or designed for EMERGENCY questions which should be directed immediately by telephone or in-person to qualified professionals.

Disclaimer: Information in questions, answers, and other posts on this site ("Posts") comes from individual users, not JustAnswer; JustAnswer is not responsible for Posts. Posts are for general information, are not intended to substitute for informed professional advice (medical, legal, veterinary, financial, etc.), or to establish a professional-client relationship. The site and services are provided "as is" with no warranty or representations by JustAnswer regarding the qualifications of Experts. To see what credentials have been verified by a third-party service, please click on the "Verified" symbol in some Experts' profiles. JustAnswer is not intended or designed for EMERGENCY questions which should be directed immediately by telephone or in-person to qualified professionals.

Show MoreShow Less

Ask Your Question

x