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Ask Dr. Meghan Denney Your Own Question
Dr. Meghan Denney
Dr. Meghan Denney, Cat Veterinarian
Category: Cat Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 1396
Experience:  Veterinarian at Kingsland Blvd Animal Clinic
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My barn kittens have their eyes matted shut. What can I do?

Customer Question

My barn kittens have their eyes matted shut. What can I do?
JA: I'm sorry to hear that. What is the kitten's name?
Customer: there are five of them in the barn, not named yet
JA: Is there anything else the Veterinarian should be aware of about yet?
Customer: They are about five weeks old and are mixed breeds. Just barn cats, but I want to help them
Submitted: 5 months ago.
Category: Cat Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. Meghan Denney replied 5 months ago.

Hi I am Dr. Denney. I am currently reviewing your post now. Please give me a few minutes to type my response. Thank you for trusting us with your question.

Expert:  Dr. Meghan Denney replied 5 months ago.

Are they matted shut with pus or green discharge? Can you send me a picture so I can see what we are dealing with?

Are they all eating ok? Are they weaned yet?

Customer: replied 5 months ago.
they are matted with a greenish colored matter. I washed them with eye drops but they matted again. They aren't completely weaned
Customer: replied 5 months ago.
Not sure how to send pic
Expert:  Dr. Meghan Denney replied 5 months ago.

I would be worried that they could have a highly contagious eye infection or conjunctivitis called Feline chlamydia. It can cause irreparable damage to the cornea and cause permanent blindness.

Both bacteria and viruses can cause conjunctivitis in cats. This condition is known as pink eye, the same thing that can affect dogs, humans, and other animals. Feline chlamydia results from a bacterial infection. Cats are usually infected with other viruses along with this disease like herpes virus and calicivirus.

Chlamydia in cats usually affects those at the younger or older end of the spectrum. Those with damaged immune systems or other illness of some sort have an increased risk too. However, the bacterial infection can cause symptoms in any cat.

Expert:  Dr. Meghan Denney replied 5 months ago.

Do you have a veterinarian that you are using currently who can examine them and start eye antibiotics so we can save their eyes?

Customer: replied 5 months ago.
I do. Thank you.
Expert:  Dr. Meghan Denney replied 5 months ago.

Another aspect we need to consider here is that these eye infections can move into the respiratory system and can lead to a very sick kitten very quickly.

Expert:  Dr. Meghan Denney replied 5 months ago.

My best recommendation for tonight is if your veterinarian is open call and see if we can get them seen. If not for tonight use warm compresses and use eye saline to flush their eyes out a few times then tomorrow morning we need to get them seen so we can hopefully save their eyes.

Expert:  Dr. Meghan Denney replied 5 months ago.

Good luck.

If this was helpful I would be most appreciative if you could take the time to rate my assistance so the site will credit me with helping you.

I am also here for additional questions you may have just reach out to me here and I will be more than happy to assist you.

Kind regards,

Dr. Meghan Denney

Expert:  Dr. Meghan Denney replied 5 months ago.

You may also consider moving their little family inside for the night into a bathroom so you can treat them easier and so we can reduce the stress on their immune systems.

Expert:  Dr. Meghan Denney replied 5 months ago.
Hi,

I'm just following up on our conversation about your pet. How is everything going?

Dr. Meghan Denney