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Dr. B.
Dr. B., Cat Veterinarian
Category: Cat Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 20621
Experience:  Small animal veterinarian with a special interest in cats, happy to discuss any questions you have.
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Won't eat, constipated, shaking, eyes changed color, It's a

Customer Question

Won't eat, constipated, shaking, eyes changed color
JA: I'm sorry to hear that. What is the cat's name and age?
Customer: It's a Siamese cat, not quite 1 year old, inside cat
JA: What is the Siamese cat's name?
Customer: Dobby
JA: Is there anything else the Veterinarian should be aware of about Dobby?
Customer: I took him in for his eyes, dr. Said he had fever, gave him a shot of antibiotics, then shortly after he stopped pooping, now won't eat
Submitted: 3 months ago.
Category: Cat Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 3 months ago.

Hello & welcome, I am Dr. B, a licensed veterinarian and I would like to help you today. I do apologize that your question was not answered before. Different experts come online at various times; I just came online, read about your wee one’s situation, and wanted to help.

How long since he last passed stool? Is he straining?

When did he last eat?

Any retching, gagging, lip licking, drooling, or vomiting?

Can he keep any water down?

Are his gums pink or white/pale? Moist or sticky?

If you press on his belly, any tensing, tenderness, discomfort, or pain?

Can you take a photo of Dobby's eye color change to let me see what you are seeing? To post a photo, you can use the paper clip button on the tool bar above the text box. Or if you cannot see that on your phone/computer, then you can post them on any site (ie Flickr, Photobucket, Imgr etc) and paste the web link here for me to have a peek.

Customer: replied 3 months ago.
Sorry I took so long getting back. It's been about a week since I've seen a bowel movement, I haven't noticed any straining, or vomiting. He when pressing on belly it seems to cause discomfort. He drinks some water. His gums appear to be white, and somewhat sticky.
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 3 months ago.

Good morning,

No worries, though I am concerned about Dobby. First, the most worrying issue is that you noted he has white gums. Paling of the gums tends to be an urgent sign. It can be caused by heart disease, lung issues (less likely if he hasn't breathing troubles though increased breathing rates could certainly put a cat off eating), anemia (from internal bleeding, bone marrow disease, or red blood damage from the immune system or parasites), or with circulatory compromise. The last one is a worry if we have a severe gut blockage. Its more often a feature of pets that eat non-edible items but we cannot rule that out for Dobby if he hasn't passing stool. So, possible foreign body, fecolith from hard feces, or even gut thickening, gut masses, or compression of the gut from enlarged organs or masses would be a worry.

Now I am just touch on constipation treatment options and what we could syringe feed since he isn't vomiting but if his gums are white; then first we'd want him seen to just make sure we head off the above concerns. Because if he has any of these severely, they could put him off eating (and little food in means little out).

For constipation, there are a few home care treatments we can try. To start, you can offer a cup of cow's milk. The lactose in milk can be helpful at increasing gut movement to get stools passed. Another option would be OTC cat hairball medication (ie. Catalax, Laxatone, etc) as it works to lubricate the gut to facilitate the movement of gut contents (hard feces in this case) out of the rectum. Or we can also give a few milliliters of a GI lubricant (ie Miralax, lactulose or food grade mineral oil) orally. These can be mixed into his food. Though if you have to give this via syringe, do so with care to avoid aspiration ( since that would cause problems we'd best avoid). And since he is off food, we can offer or syringe feed watered down canned kitten food, Hill's A/D, Royal Canin Recovery, or Clinicare Canine/Feline Liquid Diet. All of these are calorically dense, so a little goes a long way nutrition-wise.

Furthermore, we can also try adding fiber (ie canned pumpkin or a 1/4 teaspoon of unflavored Metamucil mixed into a bit of canned food) to these feeds. Just like people, these can restore fecal output regularity. Since constipation can be worsened by dehydration, make sure he has fresh water and you can even offer cat milk or low sodium chicken broth.

Overall, his eye gives the impression of a possible uveitis (though hopefully his vet has ruled out any masses on the iris or behind it. But at the moment, what is most pressing for Dobby are these white gums. It sounds like his appetite loss is secondary to the weakness the triggers for that could cause. So, with how serious our worries are with pale gums, we are safest having him seen urgently to rule out the above. His vet can of course give an enemas if he is constipated but we need to rule out those other issues as I suspect they are the heart of why he is off food and not passing stool.

Kind regards,

Dr. B.

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Expert:  Dr. B. replied 3 months ago.
Hi,

I'm just following up on our conversation about your pet. How is everything going?

Dr. B.

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