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Bill
Bill, Gunsmith
Category: Blue Book of Guns, Firearms Appraisals
Satisfied Customers: 2247
Experience:  Master machinist/tool and die maker, gunsmith, firearms appraiser.
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I have a 32 cal. Kings improvement patent March 29, 1856.

Customer Question

I have a 32 cal. Kings improvement patent March 29, 1856. Oct. 16, 1850. Octogenarian barrel metal butt plate. Number on lower stock attachment 124942a. Any idea when gun was made and approximate value? Thanks Matt
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Blue Book of Guns, Firearms Appraisals
Expert:  Bill replied 2 years ago.
Hi Matt, I would be glad to help you any way that I can by answering your question to the best of my ability.
Would you please check again on what is stamped on the barrel? Could that be 1866 and 1860 for the years stamped on the barrel? That is what is supposed to be there.
Thanks,
Bill
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
Bill,
Could be March 29, 1866. October 16, 1850.Mack
Expert:  Bill replied 2 years ago.
Thanks Mack,
Could you please tell me what is stamped on the top tang behind the hammer?
Could you please also tell me exactly what is stamped on the barrel? I'm very sorry for all the questions, but I want to properly identify exactly what Model and variation.
Thanks,
Bill
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
Winchester's repeating arms new haven ct. King's - improvement patented March 29, 1866. October 16, 1850 (maybe 1860 cannot tell for sure)
Expert:  Bill replied 2 years ago.
Thank you.
And what is stamped on the top receiver tang?
Thanks,
Bill
Customer: replied 2 years ago.
Model 1873
Expert:  Bill replied 2 years ago.
Thank you...
The year of manufacture for serial number 124942A is 1883. Model 1873s are serial numbered sequentially on the lower tang. On guns serial numbered 80,000 to 170,000, an "A" followed the number.
The .32-20 was introduced to the Model 1873 in the year 1882.
Here is some info and the current Blue Book Values:
MODEL 1873 - .32-20 WCF, .38-40 WCF, or .44-40 WCF cal., iron frame with sideplates, frame loading port, 20 or 24 in. round or octagon barrel, rifles have forearm caps and carbines have forearm bands, tube mag., blue finish with case hardened parts, oil finished stock, serial numbered on lower tang, 720,610 mfg. between 1873-1919.
Model 1873 Rifle Third Model - dust cover rail integral with frame, serial 90,000-end of production.
95%: $7500
90%: $6300
80%: $5500
70%: $4500
60%: $3750
50%: $3250
40%: $3000
30%: $1700
Percentage values listed above are for original guns with corresponding percentages of bright blue finish remaining.
Here is some info that will help you grade it:
PHOTO PERCENTAGE GRADING SYSTEM CONVERSION GUIDELINES -
New/Perfect – 100% condition with or without box. 100% on currently manufactured firearms assumes NIB (New In Box) condition and not sold previously at retail.
Mint – typically 98%-99% condition with almost no observable wear. Probably sold previously at retail, and may have been shot occasionally.
Excellent – 95%+ - 98% condition.
Very Good – 80% - 95% condition (all parts/finish should be original).
Good - 60% – 80% condition (all parts/finish should be original).
Fair – 20% - 60% condition (all parts/finish may or may not be original, but must function properly and shoot).
Poor – under 20% condition (shooting not a factor).
NRA ANTIQUE CONDITION DESCRIPTIONS -
Factory New – all original parts; 100% original finish; in perfect condition in every respect, inside and out.
Excellent – all original parts; over 80% original finish; sharp lettering, numerals and design on metal and wood; unmarred wood; fine bore.
Fine – all original parts; over 30% original finish; sharp lettering, numerals and design on metal and wood; minor marks in wood; good bore.
Very Good – all original parts; none to 30% original finish; original metal surfaces smooth with all edges sharp; clear lettering, numerals and design on metal; wood slightly scratched or bruised; bore disregarded for collectors firearms.
Good – less than 20% original finish, some minor replacement parts; metal smoothly rusted or lightly pitted in places, cleaned or reblued; principal lettering, numerals and design on metal legible; wood refinished, scratched, bruised or minor cracks repaired; in good working order.
Fair – less than 10% original finish, some major parts replaced; minor replacement parts may be required; metal rusted, may be lightly pitted all over, vigorously cleaned or reblued; rounded edges of metal and wood; principal lettering, numerals and design on metal partly obliterated;
wood scratched, bruised, cracked or repaired where broken; in fair working order or can be easily repaired and placed in working order.
Poor – little or no original finish remaining, major and minor parts replaced; major replacement parts required and extensive restoration needed; metal deeply pitted; principal lettering, numerals and design obliterated, wood badly scratched, bruised, cracked or broken; mechanically inoperative, generally undesirable as a collector's firearm.

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