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John
John, ASE Master Technician
Category: Audi
Satisfied Customers: 614
Experience:  ASE Certified Master Technician, ASE Certified Service Consultant, 22 years professional experience
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Audi A6 Quattro: how do you properly bleed brakes on a 1999

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how do you properly bleed brakes on a 1999 Audi a 6 Quattro 2.8? thanks in advance!

John :

Hello, Have you tried bleeding the brakes and are having problems or are you looking for info before you begin?

John :

If you are just needing to bleed the brakes like normal it can be done simply with 2 people.

John :

I would begin by sucking the old brake fluid out of the reservoir on the master cylinder. You can use a turkey baster or something like that to pull the fluid out. One note to keep in mind. Brake fluid and power steering fluid do not mix, so don't use something that you have used in another fluid just to be on the safe side.

John :

If you cannot get the fluid out, don't worry. Sucking the fluid out just helps reduce the time pumping all the fluid through the system.

John :

Top up the master cylinder with new fluid and reinstall the cap on the reservoir.

John :

Have a helper sit in the drivers seat. They will pump the brake pedal when you ask them to and hold the pedal down when they are done pumping.

John :

Begin at the right rear wheel (furthest from the master cylinder).

John :

You will need to be under the car, so use jackstands and make sure the car is secure on the stands.

John :

Open the bleeder on the right rear brake caliper. Attach a short piece of vacuum hose or some rubber hose to the bleeder valve on the caliper. Put the other end of the hose in a clear container so you can see the fluid you are pumping out. Have your helper pump the brake pedal until you see clean fluid come out of the rubber hose. Count the number of pumps, you don't want to run the master cylinder dry. I would say you should do no more than 20 pumps of the brake pedal at a time. If you are still getting dark fluid at from the hose after 20 pumps, have your helper hold the pedal down and close the bleeder. top up the fluid in the master cylinder and start the process again.

John :

Once the fluid comes out clean, have your helper hold the pedal down and close the bleeder. That wheel is done. Then move to the left rear wheel and do it again. Make sure to keep an eye on the fluid level in the master cylinder. Then move to the right front wheel, do the same thing then finish with the left front wheel.

John :

Top up the fluid in the master cylinder one last time, check for leaks and you are done!

John :

Please let me know if you have done this and are still having a problem. If the fluid does not come out in a clean, air free stream, it is getting air sucked in somewhere. The brake pedal should feel firm when pressed. If it feels soft that indicates there is still air in the system.

John :

I hope this is what you are looking for, if not, let me know.

John :

Thank you

John :

John

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