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Nora
Nora, Expert in Fine and Decorative Arts: Renaissance through Contemporary
Category: Antiques
Satisfied Customers: 12025
Experience:  Liberal Arts BA College Degree, Post-Graduate Christie's Education in London, 10 Yrs Art World Experience in NYC, President & Founder own Corporation. Member AOA & ISA USPAP Compliant through 2017
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I have 2 antique Japanese vases that are close to 150-160

Customer Question

I have 2 antique Japanese vases that are close to 150-160 years old and were handed down from family friends and throughout the family. These are hand painted vases and have a mark of TN Japan and signed by the artist. I am curious as to what an appraised value would be.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Antiques
Expert:  Nora replied 1 year ago.

Hello,

Please send images of both vases together side by side with a view of them from top to bottom in the image as well as clear, in-focus, close-up images of the marks.

~Nora

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Since I am new to this site... I do have a question. I previously select medium detail surrounding the vases, if I wanted high detail, what would I need to do. In addition, regarding your research and response, how is that handled - via email? If so, do you have my email address. Appreciate your patience!
Expert:  Nora replied 1 year ago.

Hi Jon,

Please note that experts here are not employees of justanswer.com; experts are verified users. I have seen these 'detail levels' a few times, but for my answers to customers, I always strive to give the most and highest detail available given my knowledge and what the object warrants.

Our communication is on this thread here, not through personal email. I can move forward with the assessment, when I see images of the marks on your vase pair, which are not attached here yet on my end.

~Nora

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hi - I sent 17 photos of which some include the images of the marks. Thanks!
Expert:  Nora replied 1 year ago.

Hello,

There are 4 images attached here, of which each are duplicates, so there are only 2 unique images. 17 is probably overloading the system. I really only need to see one very clear, in-focus close-up image of the mark on the underside of the vase to move forward with the assessment.

~Nora

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Thanks Nora - sorry for the overload :)Should I add that file now of the mark or will that conflict with the large volume of files I sent over?
Expert:  Nora replied 1 year ago.

Hello,

Please just attach the one image of the mark. As the rest are seemingly lost in cyberspace.

I am stepping away from the computer shortly, pleas rest assured that I will attend to your question when I am back online here.

~Nora

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Thanks.... I have added the photo per you request.
Expert:  Nora replied 1 year ago.

Hi Jon,

Thank you for the image and for your patience.

The McKinley Tariff in 1892 decreed that all objects have a country of origin stamp on them.

From 1892 on items from Japan went from characters or no marks to at least having the word Nippon on them. Nippon is the Japanese phonetic word for Japan. Eventually they dropped “Nippon” and used “Japan”

As a rule of thumb, objects from Japan that have the country of origin “Japan” stamped on them, mean they were produced around 1920. “Made in Japan” stamp starts a little after circa 1930’s, briefly followed by “Made in Occupied Japan” from 1945 - 1953.

Thus your vases, with the word “Japan” in the mark date to circa 1920.

The green stamped mark with a wreath under a cherry blossom indicates that TN is actually a subsidiary of the Morimura Brothers who are the owners of porcelain export giant, Nippon Toki Kasha Company, otherwise best known as Noritake. The flower is actually 5 conjoined letters “M”.

The TN stands for the makers Tame & Nakamura.

The handwritten cartouche mark in characters essentially states the Nichi Hon Nippon Shimada Zo Tame & Nakamura Moriyama. Although referred to as satsuma, it is kutani palette.

These pieces were intended for the export market, generally the destination was America.

The decoration on the pair are hand painted and depict an idyllic summer day taking a small boat ride to little islets in lake under the gaze Mt Fuji.

The is from the Taisho period which followed the Meiji Period (in the Western world, a little bit like the Edwardian era after the Victorian era).

There are lot of Japanese export wares currently available on the market and the supply is

exceeding the demand currently.

Since the vases are not mirror image, you actually have 2-of-the-same-kind and not a matched pair. A matched pair would be mirror image to each other.

On today’s market, the vases could sell for a high average of $60 - $80 each at auction. The suggested insurance or replacement value is $175 each.

~Nora

Expert:  Nora replied 1 year ago.

Hello,

Just checking in to see if you viewed your answer and if you are seeking further assistance?

Please let me know.

Sincerely,

Nora