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verbsrule
verbsrule, Bachelor's Degree
Category: Writing Homework
Satisfied Customers: 2761
Experience:  8 yrs teaching experience in English and history. Writing consultant.
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Gnaritas; Can you do an assignment for me by Sunday? Pleas I

Resolved Question:

Gnaritas;
Can you do an assignment for me by Sunday? Pleas
I will post it now
Reading Comprehension

For a minimum of five reading comprehension teaching strategies, develop a graphic organizer for each strategy that would support student learning.

1. Each graphic organizer will support the comprehension strategy being used.

2. Design the graphic organizers around a specific story and strategy.

3. Include a summary of one to two paragraphs for each graphic organizer, explaining how you would use this in a comprehension lesson.

4. Include your rationale: Specify the potential benefits of using each graphic organizer and how it will support assessment of knowledge.

Use the GCU eLibrary to locate peer-reviewed articles in support of your content.

This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment.

Reading Comprehension

Introduction

The end goal of reading is the ability to comprehend what is read. Major components in reading comprehension are background knowledge, language knowledge, text structure, decoding, and vocabulary. In addition, readers use metacognitive strategies (thinking about thinking) to fine-tune their comprehension. Good readers have formed good reading habits that allow them to apply appropriate, proven reading strategies that promote good comprehension.

Reading Comprehension Research

The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's (2000) National Reading Panel suggests that reading comprehension includes modeling and supportive guidance so that students can acquire the tools needed to comprehend text. The National Reading Panel's subgroup analyzed over two hundred studies and recommended the following:

· Reading comprehension includes the development of an awareness and understanding of the reader's own cognitive processes that are related to instruction and learning.

· Teachers should guide the reader through the strategies the reader needs to enhance comprehension performance. Through modeling and thinking aloud, teachers can foster these metacognitive skills.

· Readers should practice the strategies with the teacher supporting the reader until the reader internalizes the strategies and masters them independently.

Dowhower (1999) worked with a group of second graders to develop a strategic comprehension framework within the reading classroom. The framework focused on the three phases of reading (pre-reading, active reading, and post reading) and included what, why, how, and when comprehension questions as well as teacher-student discussion techniques. Strategies for the three phases included:

1. The pre-reading phase focused on eliciting prior knowledge, building background and relating it to prior knowledge, and specific focus on procedural knowledge strategies.

2. The active or during reading phase focused on repetition of establishing a purpose for reading, silent reading, self-monitoring, and working the story through discussion.

3. The post reading phase entails independent activities for students as individuals or groups through recall of content, reader response, extensions of test, strategy use and transfer, and informal or self-assessment.

Reading Comprehension Strategies

Palinscar and Brown (1999) suggest that reciprocal teaching in which the teacher and students take turns leading discussions on shared literature is an effective application of four comprehension strategies: prediction, clarification, summarization, and question generation. Some less complex reading comprehension strategies that are also research-based include:

· Graphic organizers such as KWL charts allow the students to present what they know (prior knowledge and building background), what they want to learn (establishing purpose), and what they have learned (informal self-assessment). Other graphic organizers, including maps, webs, grids, and other visual organizational tools help students to recognize important ideas.

· Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DR-TA) is a comprehension technique that encourages prediction and validation. The DR-TA cycle asks the reader to first predict what will happen using context clues and then validating those predictions with a section of the text.

· Directed Listening-Thinking Activity (DL-TA) provides a scaffold for making predictions as students read.

Literature and Reading Comprehension

The use of quality literature, especially with young learners, is an important element of a reading program. Effective techniques to employ literature include:

· Pattern books with repeated phrases, refrains, and sometimes rhymes.

· Big books for group shared reading.

· Readers' theater in which students act out boo
Submitted: 9 months ago.
Category: Writing Homework
Expert:  Josie-Mod replied 9 months ago.
Hi, I'm Josie and I am a moderator for this topic. I sent your requested professional a message to follow up with you here, when he is back online.

If I can help further, please let me know. Thank you for your continued patience.
Expert:  Gnaritas replied 9 months ago.
My apologies, I will not be able to do it by tomorrow. I have a full workload.
Customer: replied 9 months ago.

Ok Thanks,

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 9 months ago.
...
Expert:  verbsrule replied 9 months ago.
Hi there. Please let me know what grade/reading level.

Thanks,

Gwyn
Expert:  verbsrule replied 9 months ago.
it looks like the text you posted after the assignment was cut off. Could you post the rest of it?

Thanks!
Customer: replied 9 months ago.

Sorry I just saw your post.


My grade level I 3rd grade.


 



Reading Comprehension


Introduction


The end goal of reading is the ability to comprehend what is read. Major components in reading comprehension are background knowledge, language knowledge, text structure, decoding, and vocabulary. In addition, readers use metacognitive strategies (thinking about thinking) to fine-tune their comprehension. Good readers have formed good reading habits that allow them to apply appropriate, proven reading strategies that promote good comprehension.


Reading Comprehension Research


The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's (2000) National Reading Panel suggests that reading comprehension includes modeling and supportive guidance so that students can acquire the tools needed to comprehend text. The National Reading Panel's subgroup analyzed over two hundred studies and recommended the following:


· Reading comprehension includes the development of an awareness and understanding of the reader's own cognitive processes that are related to instruction and learning.


· Teachers should guide the reader through the strategies the reader needs to enhance comprehension performance. Through modeling and thinking aloud, teachers can foster these metacognitive skills.


· Readers should practice the strategies with the teacher supporting the reader until the reader internalizes the strategies and masters them independently.


Dowhower (1999) worked with a group of second graders to develop a strategic comprehension framework within the reading classroom. The framework focused on the three phases of reading (pre-reading, active reading, and post reading) and included what, why, how, and when comprehension questions as well as teacher-student discussion techniques. Strategies for the three phases included:


1. The pre-reading phase focused on eliciting prior knowledge, building background and relating it to prior knowledge, and specific focus on procedural knowledge strategies.


2. The active or during reading phase focused on repetition of establishing a purpose for reading, silent reading, self-monitoring, and working the story through discussion.


3. The post reading phase entails independent activities for students as individuals or groups through recall of content, reader response, extensions of test, strategy use and transfer, and informal or self-assessment.


Reading Comprehension Strategies


Palinscar and Brown (1999) suggest that reciprocal teaching in which the teacher and students take turns leading discussions on shared literature is an effective application of four comprehension strategies: prediction, clarification, summarization, and question generation. Some less complex reading comprehension strategies that are also research-based include:


· Graphic organizers such as KWL charts allow the students to present what they know (prior knowledge and building background), what they want to learn (establishing purpose), and what they have learned (informal self-assessment). Other graphic organizers, including maps, webs, grids, and other visual organizational tools help students to recognize important ideas.


· Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DR-TA) is a comprehension technique that encourages prediction and validation. The DR-TA cycle asks the reader to first predict what will happen using context clues and then validating those predictions with a section of the text.


· Directed Listening-Thinking Activity (DL-TA) provides a scaffold for making predictions as students read.


Literature and Reading Comprehension


The use of quality literature, especially with young learners, is an important element of a reading program. Effective techniques to employ literature include:


· Pattern books with repeated phrases, refrains, and sometimes rhymes.


· Big books for group shared reading.


· Readers' theater in which students act out books they have read.


· Story mapping that allows students to develop schema.


· Literature circles to discuss good literature.


· Literature response journals so students can collect informal information on their reading.


· Adapting stories into play and scripts for film and tape.


Conclusion


Reading comprehension is the ultimate goal of learning to read so that the learner can internalize the knowledge gained and use it to connect to other information. Good teachers use specific reading comprehension strategies to teach students; they model and teach purpose and application so students can apply these strategies. In addition, scaffolding is provided for students until they can independently use comprehension strategies.


References


Dowhower, S. L. (1999). Supporting a strategic stance in the classroom: A comprehension framework for helping teachers help students to be strategic. The Reading Teacher, 52(7), 672-688.


National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. (2000). Report of the National Reading Panel: Teaching children to read: An evidence-based assessment of the scientific research literature on reading and its implications for reading instruction: Reports of the subgroups (NIH Publication No. 00-4754). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.


Palinscar, A. S., & Brown, A. (1999). Reciprocal teaching of comprehension-fostering and comprehension monitoring activities. Cognition and Instruction, 1(2), 117-175.




Reading Comprehension


























































1 Unsatisfactory 0.00%


2 Less Than Satisfactory 65.00%


3 Satisfactory 75.00%


4 Good 85.00%


5 Excellent 100.00%


100.0 %Reading Comprehension Rubric


40.0 % Graphic organizers for comprehension strategies, including summary for each.


Graphic organizers are missing or incomplete.


Graphic organizers are incomplete or disorganized.


Graphic organizers are complete and organized.


Graphic organizers are complete, organized, and coherent.


Graphic organizers are complete, organized, coherent, and cohesive. Higher-order thinking is evident.


30.0 % Technical Requirements: Number of graphic organizers


Less than four graphic organizers are present.


At least four graphic organizers are present.


At least five graphic organizers are present.


At least six graphic organizers are present.


At least seven graphic organizers are present.


10.0 % Rationale


Rationale is not included in the graphic organizers.


Rationale is present in some of the graphic organizers.


Every graphic organizer contains a rationale.


Every graphic organizer contains a rationale that is clear and coherent.


Every graphic organizer contains a rationale that is clear, coherent, and cohesive.


10.0 % Research


No outside sources were used to support the assignment.


Few outside sources were used to support the assignment. Limited research is apparent.


Research is adequate. Sources are standard in relevance, quality of outside sources, and/or timeliness.


Research is timely and relevant, and addresses all of the issues stated in the assignment criteria.


Research is supportive of the rationale presented. Sources are distinctive. Addresses all of the issues stated in the assignment criteria.


5.0 % Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar, and language use)


Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning. Inappropriate word choice and/or sentence construction are employed.


Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader. Inconsistencies in language choice (register) and/or word choice are present.


Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but are not overly distracting to the reader. Audience-appropriate language is employed.


Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present. The writer uses a variety of sentence structures and effective figures of speech.


The writer is clearly in command of standard, written academic English.


5.0 % Research Citations (in-text citations for paraphrasing and direct quotes, and references page listing and formatting, as appropriate to assignment and style)


No references page and no citations are included.


References page is present, but citations are inconsistently used.


References page is included. Sources are appropriately documented, although some errors may be present.


References page is present and fully inclusive of all cited sources. Documentation is appropriate and citation style is usually correct




 


 

Expert:  verbsrule replied 9 months ago.
OK, thank you.
Expert:  verbsrule replied 9 months ago.
Just to keep you posted--it will be late tonight before I can finish this.
Customer: replied 9 months ago.

Gwyn;


Thank. You I will look for it.


 


 


 


Bernice:

Expert:  verbsrule replied 9 months ago.
OK
Customer: replied 9 months ago.

Gwyn,


How is it's going?


 


 


Bernice,

Expert:  verbsrule replied 9 months ago.
I am on 4 of 5 and as soon as my little wild child goes to bed, I will be able to finish the last ones.
Customer: replied 9 months ago.

Laughing


Thanks Bernice,

Expert:  verbsrule replied 9 months ago.
OK, please let me know if you have any questions!

https://app.box.com/s/bkfp53u2ezqgmdhe4x18


Have a great night, Gwyn
verbsrule, Bachelor's Degree
Category: Writing Homework
Satisfied Customers: 2761
Experience: 8 yrs teaching experience in English and history. Writing consultant.
verbsrule and 2 other Writing Homework Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 9 months ago.

Good Morning Gwyn;


I posted an assignment under Gwyn can you please look @ it for me and let me know if you will be able to do the assignment please.


 


 


Thanks Bernice.

Expert:  verbsrule replied 9 months ago.
I just replied on the thread. I will try and get to it today. We have family coming in from out of town, so I won't be able to do any work tomorrow or Monday.
Customer: replied 9 months ago.

Ok Thanks,


I read that can I post my other assignment, on Tuesday that is due on the 20th? That one that is already posted is due tomorrow the 13th


 


 


Thanks Bernice.

Expert:  verbsrule replied 9 months ago.
Go ahead and post both of them for me. Thanks!
Customer: replied 9 months ago.

Ok you have the first one that is that is due tomorrow, I will post it again here,


First Assignment this is due tomorrow. This is it.


The Writing Process


Review the 6+1 Traits, found on Education Northwest's Regional Education Laboratory website. Create a graphic organizer that includes a definition for each trait, as well as an activity that supports learning.


This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment.


Lecture



Writing and Spelling


Introduction


In a balanced literacy program, writing should be given equal time with reading; however, in most literacy programs reading significantly outweighs writing instruction (Rasinski & Padak, 2004). Instruction in writing is equally as important and has a positive impact on reading.


Process Writing


Process writing consists of five interrelated stages (Rasinski & Padak, 2004). In the prewriting stage, students generate ideas for writing with main ideas and supporting information. Students use skills such as brainstorming, questioning, and clustering of information. The drafting stage allows students to get ideas written quickly. Strategies to support this stage include journal writing and learning logs. The revision stage includes the rearranging of information and changing sentences to support the purpose and audience for the paper. Teacher conferences and peer response groups are important strategies for revisions. The editing stage includes working on punctuation, grammar, and mechanics. Peer editing, proof-reading, and spelling checks are appropriate activities for this stage. The publishing stage involves sharing writing with others and creating a classroom library of student work.


6+1 Trait® Writing for Assessment and Instruction


Through use of the 6+1 Trait® Writing model (Northwest Regional Educational Lab, n.d.), teachers have a framework to formatively evaluate student writing though an analytical process. The program focuses on these writing traits and evaluates each area separately:


· Ideas: The meaning and development of the message.


· Organization: The internal structure of the piece.


· Voice: The way the writer brings the topic to life.


· Word choice: The specific vocabulary the writer uses to convey meaning.


· Sentence fluency: The way the words and phrases flow throughout the text.


· Conventions: The mechanical correctness of the piece.


· Presentation: The overall appearance of the work.


After instruction on the traits, students are able to revise their work using the evaluative tools for each trait.


Spelling


Spelling has been traditionally considered a separate subject in school with students memorizing weekly lists of words. Some researchers now feel that the acquisition of English spelling is a complex process that needs to be imbedded in a language-arts program (Gentry, 1982; Razinski & Padak, 2004).


Since English is not a phonetic language and letters can represent more than one sound, learning to spell is difficult. As young children try to attach sounds to letters and attempt to spell, they typically use some version of invented, or temporary, spelling. With invented spelling, students are able to convey that writing represents meaning and purpose. Invented spelling occurs in the developmental phase, where children only write the letters for the sounds they hear in a word. When children use invented spelling, they demonstrate their understanding of letters, the sounds associated with each letter, and that words are made up of letters representing the sounds of oral language.


Gentry (1982) described five stages of spelling:


1. Pre-communicative: Children use letters but show no knowledge of the letter-sound correspondence.


2. Semi-phonetic: Children understand letter-sound correspondence but use rudimentary or single letters to represent words.


3. Phonetic: Children use a letter or group of letters to represent every speech sound in a systematic way.


4. Transitional: Children begin to assimilate the conventional way to represent sounds.


5. Correct: Children know the English orthographic system and its basic rules.


Conclusion


Writing is an important skill in literacy development and deserves the same emphasis as reading instruction. The use of process writing and programs such as 6+1® Traits Writing can support better student writing. Students should have opportunities to write across the curriculum and in all subject areas on a regular basis.


References


Gentry, J. R. (1982). An analysis of development spelling in GNYS AT WRK. The Reading Teacher, 36, 192-200.


Northwest Regional Educational Lab, (n.d.) Retrieved march 26, 2010, from http://www.nwrel.org/comm/centers/index.php


Rasinski, T., & Padak, N. (2004). Beyond consensus−beyond balance: Toward a comprehensive literacy curriculum. Reading and Writing Quarterly, 20(1), 91-102





| Writing and Spelling









Details:

Review the 6+1 Traits, found on Education Northwest's Regional Education Laboratory website. Create a graphic organizer that includes a definition for each trait, as well as an activity that supports learning.


This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment.





















The Writing Process































































1 Unsatisfactory 0.00%


2 Less Than Satisfactory 65.00%


3 Satisfactory 75.00%


4 Good 85.00%


5 Excellent 100.00%


100.0 %The Writing Process Rubric


25.0 % Writing traits graphic organizer: definitions


The writing traits graphic organizer is missing many of the definitions.


The writing traits graphic organizer consists of most of the definitions.


The writing traits graphic organizer consists of all the required definitions.


The writing traits graphic organizer consists of all the required definitions, which are well-delineated.


The writing traits graphic organizer consists of all the required definitions, which are well-delineated and coherent.


45.0 % Writing traits graphic organizer: activities


The activities are missing, weak, or incomplete.


Attention to detail in the activities is minimal, underdeveloped, or inappropriate for teaching. Activities are mostly grade appropriate.


Activities are appropriate for grade level and encourage participation.


Activities are appropriate for grade level, provide meaningful practice with familiar text, and encourage participation. Activities are engaging.


Activities are exceptionally organized and create multiple and meaningful opportunities to practice. Activities are creative and engaging.


10.0 % Research


No outside sources were used to support the assignment.


Few outside sources were used to support the assignment. Limited research is apparent.


Research is adequate. Sources are standard in relevance, quality of outside sources, and/or timeliness.


Research is timely and relevant, and addresses all of the issues stated in the assignment criteria.


Research is supportive of the rationale presented. Sources are distinctive. Addresses all of the issues stated in the assignment criteria.


5.0 % Originality


The work is an extensive collection and rehash of other people's ideas, products, images, or inventions. There is no evidence of new thought or inventiveness.


The work is a minimal collection or rehash of other people's ideas, products, images, or inventions. There is no evidence of new thought.


The product shows evidence of originality. While based on other people's ideas, products, images, or inventions, the work does offer some new insights.


The product shows evidence of originality and inventiveness. While based on an extensive collection of other people's ideas, products, images, or inventions, the work extends beyond that collection to offer new insights.


The product shows significant evidence of originality and inventiveness. The majority of the content and many of the ideas are fresh, original, inventive, and based upon logical conclusions and sound research.


10.0 % Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar, and language use)


Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning. Inappropriate word choice and/or sentence construction are employed.


Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader. Inconsistencies in language choice (register) and/or word choice are present.


Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but are not overly distracting to the reader. Audience-appropriate language is employed.


Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present. The writer uses a variety of sentence structures and effective figures of speech.


The writer is clearly in command of standard, written academic English.


5.0 % Research Citations (in-text citations for paraphrasing and direct quotes, and references page listing and formatting, as appropriate to assignment and style)


No references page and no citations are included.


References page is present, but citations are inconsistently used.


References page is included. Sources are appropriately documented, although some errors may be present.


References page is present and fully inclusive of all cited sources. Documentation is appropriate and citation style is usually correct.


In-text citations and a references page are complete. The documentation of cited sources is free of errors.


100 % Total Weightage







Next Assignment Due on the 20th


Prepare this assignment according to the instructions in "EED 470 Benchmark Assessment and Rubric." All coursework will inform this assignment.


Submit the assignment in TaskStream. Directions for submitting to TaskStream can be found on the College of Education's page in the


Student Success



EED 470 Benchmark Assessment and Rubric



Targeted Essential Learning


Effective literacy teaching focuses on research-based strategies and utilizes student assessment data in order to plan instruction that improves student achievement. (APTS 1, 3, 4, 5; INTASC 4, 8)


Assessment Tool Selected


1) Data-based lesson plans


2) Intervention activities


Specific Performance/Task(s)



  • Generate a variety of formal and informal assessment tools that align with instruction in order to measure student learning. (APTS 1.3, 3.1, 4.2)

  • Select and utilize best practice implementation strategies appropriate to different developmental levels. (APTS 3.7)

  • Collect, maintain, and use records of student work and performance/achievement to monitor student progress. (APTS 4.3)

  • Analyze assessment outcomes to inform instructional methodologies. (APTS 4.3)

  • Collaborate in the design, implementation, and support of learning programs that develop students’ academic abilities. (APTS 5)


Relevancy of Task to Teacher Candidate


By engaging in the instruction and assessment cycle, teachers are able to create more effective literacy instruction that is tailored to student reading development levels.



General Practicum Information


i) Students’ practicum experiences should follow the practicum experience requirements, including the diversity and hour requirements for this course as noted on the Practicum Placement Form.


ii) Students should fill out the Practicum Placement Form and Observation Record. Complete the form with the name of the school and grade levels where the observations took place and document the hours spent in the classroom. Submit the form to the course instructor along with your Benchmark Assessment in Module 8.


iii) Ensure that the classroom teacher has completed a Classroom Teacher Evaluation Feedback Form, found in the practicum manual, for each observation.


iv) Spend 20 hours in one classroom, grades 1-3. Let your mentor know that you are working on developing assessment skills. Throughout the practicum, observe and interview your mentor.


b) Practicum Observations/Teaching Lessons


i) In Modules 2-6, devote attention to each of the four areas of literacy development. For each of these categories, observe a classroom (grades 1-3) as the teacher and students focus on one of the four areas. Keep notes on activities used by the teacher. Suggested practicum schedule for observations and teaching the lesson plans:


(1) Module 2: Observations only; look for differentiation techniques for ELL’s and special needs students.


(2) Module 3: Phonemic Awareness and Phonics


(3) Module 4: Word Study and Fluency


(4) Module 5: Vocabulary Development


(5) Module 6: Comprehension


ii) Lesson Plans and Teaching Lessons


(1) In each of the four areas and using literacy assessments available in the classroom, administer a pre-test to one student in your practicum classroom.


(2) After you have administered the pre-test, confer with the mentor teacher and prepare lesson plans to address the four areas of literacy development. These lessons should be based on the direct instruction model. The lessons should reflect the areas of need identified through the data analysis collected from the pre-test.


(3) Teach the lessons to the one student you assessed previously.


(1) Administer assessments as a post-test to the same student. Analyze the data to see if learning has improved from the pre-test to the post-test.


Assessment: Student Prompts/Teacher Directions


Individual: Practicum Teacher Work Sample (Benchmark Assessment)


a) Reflection Paper


(1) Write a 1000-1250 word essay summarizing:


(a) Your learning experience during the practicum


(b) Assessment administration- the pre and post assessment data, challenges and strengths.


(c) Data analysis. Include a chart or graphic organizer.


(d) Specific activities with the student during instruction


(e) Progress made to be notated in the chart


(f) Collaboration with the classroom teacher


(g) Your reflection on how assessment guides instruction. Explain how data was used to target the needs of the student and to plan instruction.


(2) Use standard essay format in APA style, including an introduction, conclusion, and title page. An abstract is not required. Cite in-text and in the References section.


c) Submission of Benchmark Assessment


i) Combine all of your assessment data, copies of your lesson plans for each of the literacy areas, and reflection paper under one APA-style title page.


ii) Complete and include the applicable Practicum Placement and the Observation Log forms located in the practicum manual.


iii) Obtain the completed Classroom Teacher Evaluation Feedback Forms from practicum classroom teacher and include them with the submission of the Benchmark Assessment.


iv) Submit this assignment to the instructor in ANGEL by the end of Module 8.


v) Additionally, submit the assignment in TaskStream. Directions for submitting to TaskStream can be found on the College of Education’s page in the StudentSuccessCenter.


 


Scoring Tool/Guide (Rubric)


(Benchmark Assessment)











































































































































































Levels/Criteria



1: Unsatisfactory



2: Less than Satisfactory



3: Satisfactory



4: Good



5: Excellent



Score/Level





0%



65%



75%



85%



100%





Applying ACEI Standards 15% 1.0 Development, Learning, and Motivation (1.875%)



Candidates do not know, understand, or use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to development of children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual students’ development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation.



Candidates know and understand some of the concepts, principles, theories, and research related to development of children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual students’ development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation but rarely use them effectively.



Candidates know, understand, and effectively use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to development of children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual students’ development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation.



Candidates know, understand, and carefully use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to development of children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual students’ development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation.



Candidates know, understand, and methodically use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to development of children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual students’ development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation.



 



2.1 Reading, Writing, and Oral Language (1.88%)



Candidates do not demonstrate competence in use of English language arts, nor do they know, understand, or use concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas.



Candidates demonstrate a limited level of competence in use of English language arts and they know, understand, and use few concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas.



Candidates demonstrate an adequate level of competence in use of English language arts and they know, understand, and use concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas.



Candidates demonstrate a high level of competence in use of English language arts and they know, understand, and use concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas.



Candidates demonstrate a comprehensive level of competence in use of English language arts and they know, understand, and use concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas.



 



3.1 Integrating and Applying Knowledge for Instruction(1.875%)



Candidates do not plan or implement instruction based on knowledge of students, learning theory, connections across the curriculum, curricular goals, or community.



Candidates rarely plan or implement instruction based on knowledge of students, learning theory, connections across the curriculum, curricular goals, and community.



Candidates plan and implement instruction based on knowledge of students, learning theory, connections across the curriculum, curricular goals, and community.



Candidates skillfully plan and implement instruction based on knowledge of students, learning theory, connections across the curriculum, curricular goals, and community.



Candidates methodically plan and implement instruction based on knowledge of students, learning theory, connections across the curriculum, curricular goals, and community.



 



3.2 Adaptation to Diverse Students (1.875%)



Candidates do not understand how elementary students differ in their development and approaches to learning, nor do they create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students.



Candidates do not completely understand how elementary students differ in their development and approaches to learning, and rarely create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students.



Candidates understand how elementary students differ in their development and approaches to learning, and create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students.



Candidates understand how elementary students differ in their development and approaches to learning, and skillfully create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students.



Candidates understand how elementary students differ in their development and approaches to learning, and methodically create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students.



 



3.3 Development of Critical Thinking and Problem Solving(1.875%)



Candidates do not understand or use a variety of teaching strategies that encourage elementary students’ development of critical thinking or problem solving.



Candidates understand but rarely use a variety of teaching strategies that encourage elementary students’ development of critical thinking and problem solving.



Candidates understand and use a variety of teaching strategies that encourage elementary students’ development of critical thinking and problem solving.



Candidates understand and efficiently use a variety of teaching strategies that encourage elementary students’ development of critical thinking and problem solving.



Candidates understand and meticulously use a variety of teaching strategies that encourage elementary students’ development of critical thinking and problem solving.



 



4.0 Assessment for Instruction (1.88%)



Candidates do not know, understand, or use formal and informal assessments strategies to plan, evaluate or strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of elementary student.



Candidates know, understand, but rarely use some formal and informal assessments strategies to plan, evaluate and strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of elementary student.



Candidates know, understand, and use formal and informal assessments strategies to plan, evaluate and strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of elementary student.



Candidates know, understand, and effectively use formal and informal assessments strategies to plan, evaluate and strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of elementary student.



Candidates know, understand, and strategically use formal and informal assessments strategies to plan, evaluate and strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of elementary student.



 



5.1 Professional Growth, Reflection, and Evaluation(1.88%)



Candidates are not aware of and do not reflect on their practice in light of research on teaching, professional ethics, and resources available for professional learning; they do not evaluate the effects of their professional decisions and actions on students, families and other professionals in the learning community or actively seek out opportunities to grow professionally.



Candidates are rarely aware of and scarcely reflect on their practice in light of research on teaching, professional ethics, and resources available for professional learning; they seldom evaluate the effects of their professional decisions and actions on students, families and other professionals in the learning community and do not seek out opportunities to grow professionally.



Candidates are aware of and reflect on their practice in light of research on teaching, professional ethics, and resources available for professional learning; they occasionally evaluate the effects of their professional decisions and actions on students, families and other professionals in the learning community and seek out opportunities to grow professionally.



Candidates are aware of and reflect on their practice in light of research on teaching, professional ethics, and resources available for professional learning; they typically evaluate the effects of their professional decisions and actions on students, families and other professionals in the learning community and seek out opportunities to grow professionally.



Candidates are aware of and reflect on their practice in light of research on teaching, professional ethics, and resources available for professional learning; they continually evaluate the effects of their professional decisions and actions on students, families and other professionals in the learning community and actively seek out opportunities to grow professionally.



 



5.2 Collaboration with Families, Colleagues, and Community Agencies (1.88%)



Candidates do not know the importance of establishing or maintaining a positive collaborative relationship with families, school colleagues, and agencies in the larger community to promote the intellectual, social, emotional, physical growth and well-being of children.



Candidates know very little about the importance of establishing and maintaining a positive collaborative relationship with families, school colleagues, and agencies in the larger community and do not know how to use that knowledge to promote the intellectual, social, emotional, physical growth and well-being of children.



Candidates know the importance of establishing and maintaining a positive collaborative relationship with families, school colleagues, and agencies in the larger community but know very little about how to use that knowledge to promote the intellectual, social, emotional, physical growth and well-being of children.



Candidates know the importance of establishing and maintaining a positive collaborative relationship with families, school colleagues, and agencies in the larger community and effectively know how to use that knowledge to promote the intellectual, social, emotional, physical growth and well-being of children.



Candidates know the importance of establishing and maintaining a positive collaborative relationship with families, school colleagues, and agencies in the larger community and know how to comprehensively use that knowledge to promote the intellectual, social, emotional, physical growth and well-being of children.



 



Content: Lesson Plans: (70%) Vocabulary: (14%)



The vocabulary lesson plan is missing many of the required components. Attention to prior knowledge and essential vocabulary is weak or missing..



The vocabulary lesson plan consists of most of the required components. Attention to prior knowledge and essential vocabulary is minimal or underdeveloped.



The vocabulary lesson plan consists of all the required components. The lesson activates prior knowledge and teaches essential vocabulary that enhances comprehension.



All lesson plan components are addressed. Prior knowledge is surveyed and built to support new learning. Essential vocabulary is thoughtfully developed and meaningfully connected to prior knowledge.



All lesson plan components are addressed. Exceptionally organized activities that create depth of understanding through connecting old knowledge with new knowledge and predictions.



 



Phonemic Awareness and Phonics: (14%)



The phonemic awareness and phonics lesson plan is missing many of the required components. Attention to phonemic awareness and phonics is weak, missing, or incomplete. Skills and activities are not grade appropriate..



The phonemic awareness and phonics lesson plan consists of most of the required components. Attention to phonemic awareness and phonics is minimal or underdeveloped. Skills and activities are mostly grade appropriate.



The phonemic awareness and phonics lesson plan consists of all the required components. The phonemic awareness and phonics activities are grade appropriate and teach students to actively analyze word parts in an effort to generalize to new word. .



All lesson plan components are addressed. The phonemic awareness and phonics skills and activities are thoughtfully developed and meaningfully connected to grade appropriate academic standards.



All lesson plan components are addressed. Exceptionally organized activities that create multiple and meaningful opportunities to learn word parts that aid in segmenting and blending phonemes and letters. There is a strategic balance between word sounds and word letters.



 



Word Study and Fluency: (14%)



The word study/ fluency lesson plan is missing many of the required components. The word study/fluency activities are missing, weak, or incomplete. Skills and activities are not grade appropriate..



The word study/ fluency lesson plan consists of most of the required components. Attention to word study/fluency is minimal, underdeveloped, or inappropriate for teaching word study/ fluency. Skills and activities are mostly grade appropriate.



The word study/ fluency lesson plan consists of all the required components. The word study activities develop ways to build fluency (speed and accuracy) with text. Activities are appropriate for grade level and encourage participation.



All lesson plan components are addressed. The fluency skills and activities are thoughtfully developed and provide meaningful practice with familiar text. The fluency activities are fun, interactive, and creative.All lesson plan components are addressed. The word study skills and activities are thoughtfully developed and provide meaningful fluency practice with familiar text. The word study/ fluency activities are fun, interactive, and creative.



All lesson components are addressed. Exceptionally organized activities create multiple and meaningful opportunities to practice word study skills while reading whole text with smoothness, accuracy, speed, and prosody. Activities are engaging and focus on fluent decoding/ processing of whole text.



 



Comprehension: (14%)



The reading comprehension lesson plan is missing many the required components. Attention to reading comprehension is weak, missing, or incomplete. Skills and activities are not grade appropriate.



The reading comprehension lesson plan consists of most of the required components. Attention to reading comprehension is minimal or underdeveloped. Minimal or no attention is given to quality “before, during, and after” reading activities to develop comprehension. Skills and activities are mostly grade appropriate.



The reading comprehension lesson plan consists of all the required components. The reading comprehension activities address “before, during, and after” reading stages. The learning activities are high quality and strategically selected.



All lesson plan components are addressed. The reading comprehension activities are thoughtfully developed and focus on building understanding of text and extending learning beyond the text.



All lesson plan components are addressed. Exceptionally organized activities that create multiple and meaningful opportunities to create and extend learning of the text. There is a variety of useful strategies in activity selection. The specific comprehension strategies teach student independence.



 



Assessment Instruments: (14%)



Assessment instruments are inappropriate and/or do not focus on the required areas. Data is weakly analyzed. The selected learning experiences are at the wrong level or are inappropriate.



Most of the assessment instruments are skill appropriate and focus on the required areas. Data is minimally or incorrectly analyzed. Most of the learning experiences are at the right level.



Assessment instruments are skill appropriate and focus on the required areas. Data is thoughtfully analyzed to select appropriate learning experiences at the right level.



Multiple assessment instruments are used for each skill area. Triangulation of data is used to support the analysis/ conclusions. Data analysis strongly supports the selection of lesson choices.



Graphs and tables are used to represent the data. Strong justifications are provided to explicate the direct connections between activity selections and the student assessment data. Assessment results clearly indicate student achievement level.



 



Reflection Paper Content: (10%)



The reflection portion is superficial and/or lacks quality attention to areas for self-improvement. Weak or no connections are made between the assignment and the text readings. Suggestions are unrealistic and impractical.



The reflection portion identifies several areas for self-improvement, but with minimal depth. Some connections are made between the assignment and the text readings. Most suggestions are realistic and practical.



The reflection portion has depth and identifies areas for self-improvement. Connections are made between the assignment and the text readings. Suggestions are realistic and practical.



There is a thorough reflection that involves input from the classroom teacher and demonstrates self-reflection that is directly supported with examples. Suggestions for improvements incorporate clear steps that are logically based on the examples provided in paper.



The reflection is exceptionally organized and strongly supported by many concrete examples from the data and lesson events. The candidate demonstrates a solid self-reflection that incorporates classroom teacher’s comments and that offers superb suggestions for improvement.



 



Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar): (2.5%)



Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning.



Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader.



Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but are not overly distracting to the reader.



Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present.



Writer is clearly in control of standard, written American English.



 



APA Format and Style Requirements: (2.5%)



APA format and style are not evident.



Title page is present, though missing APA elements; in-text citations, where necessary, are used but formatted inaccurately and not referenced.



All key elements of an APA title page are present; in-text citations and a reference section are present with few format errors. Mechanics of writing are reflective of APA style.



Plan elements are theoretically supported with accurate citations and references.



A broad understanding of APA format and style is evident in use of level headings and lists, for example.



 




Thanks Bernice,


I have done my Practicum Placement and the Observation Log forms if you need it let me know I can post it as well


Bernice.



 

Expert:  verbsrule replied 9 months ago.
Please open a new question. Thank you.
Customer: replied 9 months ago.

Ok


Bernice


 

Customer: replied 9 months ago.

Did you get the new open question?


 


 


Bernice,


 

Customer: replied 9 months ago.

Gwyn,


Please let me know if you got the new open question, I really do not want any one else to do my work? If not let me know so I can ck with customer about the question.


 


 


Bernice,

Customer: replied 9 months ago.


Gwyn,


I am really getting worried I posted the question the just answer people sent you a message there is no response, the payment is there.


 


 


Let me know please Bernice.

Expert:  verbsrule replied 9 months ago.
I am sorry but it is not showing up in your question list or the main homework list.
Customer: replied 8 months ago.

I do not know what to say the just answer said that it was I posted the funds as well, what do I do I really need you help, the just answer people said that they see it,


 


I will try it again pay more money ,


 


Bernice.

Expert:  verbsrule replied 8 months ago.
I am sorry, but I don't see only this one question open in your list and none others. I am spending time with my family today and Monday. If you need my help, please, in the future, post the questions at least three or four days in advance.
Customer: replied 8 months ago.

Sorry I though you was on line


 


Bernice.

Expert:  verbsrule replied 8 months ago.
I see now that the question was put in the medical category, which is why there was no way for me to see it. Do you want me to finish the 6+1 chart tonight?

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