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Gnaritas, Bachelor's Degree
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Experience:  I am skilled at writing papers from reports to research, also short essays.
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Gnaritas:



Can you please do and assignment for me? I need it by Sunday evening

please let me know.

this is the assignment.



Legal and Ethical Implications for Classroom Management

Using the GCU eLibrary, research a minimum of four articles that address the legal and ethical implications for classroom management related to the rights and responsibilities of students, parents, and teachers.

In an essay of 1,250-1,500 words:

1. Clearly identify and summarize each article.



2. Reflect on what you read in each. How will it make a difference in the way you manage your classroom?

Early Childhood Education students should focus on Birth to Age 5/Pre-K and K to Age 8/Grade 3. Elementary Education students should focus on Grades K-8. Secondary Education students should focus on Grades 7-12.

Prepare this assignment according to the APA guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required. Cite in-text and in the References section.

This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment.




This is the Rubric


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Assignment

Week 5 | Handling Difficult Situations
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Assignment Legal and Ethical Implications for Classroom Management





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Due Date: Aug 04, 2013 23:59:59 Max Points: 40
Details:
Using the GCU eLibrary, research a minimum of four articles that address the legal and ethical implications for classroom management related to the rights and responsibilities of students, parents, and teachers.

In an essay of 1,250-1,500 words:

1. Clearly identify and summarize each article.



2. Reflect on what you read in each. How will it make a difference in the way you manage your classroom?

Early Childhood Education students should focus on Birth to Age 5/Pre-K and K to Age 8/Grade 3. Elementary Education students should focus on Grades K-8. Secondary Education students should focus on Grades 7-12.

Prepare this assignment according to the APA guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required. Cite in-text and in the References section.

This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful c

Apply Rubrics

Legal and Ethical Implications for Classroom Management
Legal and Ethical Implications: Reflection Regarding Students

Does not reflect on the information from specific articles.

Reflects on the information from specific articles, but reflection lacks depth of insight.

Reflection indicates legal and ethical implications for classroom management as it relates to students.

Implications are adequately described and an opinion is expressed.

Implications are described clearly with anecdotes.


20.0 % Legal and Ethical Implications: Reflection Regarding Parents

Does not reflect on the information from specific articles.

Reflects on the information from specific articles, but reflection lacks depth of insight.

Reflection indicates legal and ethical implications for classroom management as it relates to parents.

Implications are adequately described and an opinion is expressed.

Implications are described clearly with anecdotes.


15.0 % Legal and Ethical Implications: Reflection Regarding Teachers
Submitted: 11 months ago.
Category: Writing Homework
Expert:  Josie-Mod replied 11 months ago.
Hi, I'm Josie and I am a moderator for this topic. I sent your requested professional a message to follow up with you here, when he is back online.

If I can help further, please let me know. Thank you for your continued patience.
Customer: replied 11 months ago.

ok


Thanks Bernice:

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.
I'll take care of it for you.
Customer: replied 11 months ago.

Gnaritas:


Please don't forget that is due tomorrow Sunday the 4th August 2013.


 


 


 


Thanks you so much.


 


Bernice

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.

It the due time 8pm or later tomorrow night?

Customer: replied 11 months ago.

It's due later, I don't what time Zone but it look like Midwest time if so 11pm., but hopeful you can get it to me as early as possible.


 


 


Thanks Bernice:

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.

I'll take care of it.

Customer: replied 11 months ago.

OK, Thanks Bernice, I will hear from you later today.

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.

Here's the assignment: https://app.box.com/s/x1lxa9j47yvqvbvh5afy

 

If you need help again let me know?

Gnaritas, Bachelor's Degree
Category: Writing Homework
Satisfied Customers: 1389
Experience: I am skilled at writing papers from reports to research, also short essays.
Gnaritas and 5 other Writing Homework Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 11 months ago.

Gnaritas:


Can you please do this assignment for me I need it right away?


Using the Building Classroom Discipline reading for this module, choose six classroom management pioneers and create a PowerPoint (minimum of 15 slides) with detailed notes summarizing their respective theories or discipline models.


 


Highlight the specific contribution of each to contemporary classroom management theory.


 


Early Childhood Education students should focus on Age 5/Pre-K to Age 8/Grade 3. Elementary Education students should focus on Grades K-8. Secondary Education students should focus on Grades 7-12.


 


While APA format is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected and in-text citations and references should be presented using APA documentation guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center.


 


This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment


h and 21st Century Classroom Management Pioneers













































































1 Unsatisfactory 0.00%


2 Less Than Satisfactory 65.00%


3 Satisfactory 75.00%


4 Good 85.00%


5 Excellent 100.00%


80.0 %Content


30.0 % Theories or Discipline Models


Presentation does not present summaries of five theories or discipline models.


Theory or model summaries are weak or missing key elements.


Summaries of five theories or discipline models by classic classroom management pioneers are evident.


Summaries contain accurate and complete information.


Summaries provide little known or interesting facts about the theories.


40.0 % Slide Notes


Slide notes are missing.


Information on each theory is sketchy; missing completely in some cases.


Slide notes are present for all six theories or models, and information is somewhat detailed.


Information is clear and concise.


Information is informative and interesting.


10.0 % Contributions of Pioneers


Contributions are missing or do not make the connection to contemporary classroom management theory.


Contributions are present but may be inaccurate in some cases.


Summaries include an accurate contribution of each pioneer to contemporary classroom management theory.


Connections between the pioneer and contemporary theory are clear.


Highlighted connections are insightful.


10.0 %Presentation


10.0 % PowerPoint Presentation (minimum of 15 slides)


Presentation does not meet minimum slide count and does not include title and/or reference slides.


Presentation meets minimum slide count, but is missing either a title or reference slide.


Presentation includes all required elements, but lacks creative use of PowerPoint functions.


Presentation uses some design and animation schemes.


Presentation makes maximum use of PowerPoint functions such as design templates, color and animation schemes, and clip art.


10.0 %Mechanics, Format, Organization, and Effectiveness


5.0 % Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar)


Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning.


Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader.


Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but are not overly distracting to the reader.


Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present.


Writer is clearly in control of standard, written American English.


3.0 % Language Use and Audience Awareness (includes sentence construction, word choice, etc.)


Inappropriate word choice and/or sentence construction, lack of variety in language use. Writer appears to be unaware of audience. Use of "primer prose" indicates writer either doesn't apply figures of speech or uses them inappropriately.


Some distracting and/or inconsistencies in language choice (register), sentence structure, and/or word choice are present. Sentence structure may be sporadic. The writer exhibits some lack of control in using figures of speech appropriately.


Sentence structure is correct and occasionally varies. Language is appropriate to the targeted audience for the most part.


The writer is clearly aware of audience; uses a variety of sentence structures and appropriate vocabulary for the target audience; uses figures of speech to communicate clearly.


The writer uses a variety of sentence constructions, figures of speech, and word choice in unique and creative ways that are appropriate to purpose, discipline, and scope.


2.0 % Evaluating and Documenting Sources (includes use of appropriate style, correct in-text and citation format, etc.)


Plagiarism; rarely follows any documentation format correctly; uses non-credible sources


Uses documentation, but frequent formatting/citation errors are present; some sources have questionable credibility


Sources used are credible and documented appropriately to the discipline; formatting and citation is usually correct, but some lack of control is apparent.


Documentation is appropriate and formatting/citation is correct, although a few errors/typos may be present; most sources are authoritative.


There are virtually no errors in documentation format or citation; all sources are authoritative



Diversity and Student Engagement


Introduction



Cultural Diversity


Education in the United States has always been culturally and linguistically diverse, though it tends to reflect the values, traditions, and customs of Caucasian American society (Charles, 2008). Today, it is becoming more so than ever before. Approximately 42% of the school population is comprised of minorities (National Center for Educational Statistics, 2007), including African American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native. It is incumbent upon teachers to recognize the cultural nuances of each of these groups and how they might play out in the classroom.


Socioeconomic Diversity


Many students come from poor families and do not have the resources or the background for traditional educational readiness. Children bring into the classroom the hidden rules of the class into which they are born; if they are born into poverty or find themselves in situational poverty, they are likely to misunderstand the rules of success in a classroom because, for the most part, schools function on the hidden rules of the middle class (Payne, 1996). This can lead to classroom management issues. As teachers understand the rules of the socioeconomic classes within their classroom, they can teach students how to respond appropriately in a school setting. Teachers should seek an understanding of the values, customs, and lifestyles of those who are economically disadvantaged. It will help to build relationships if students know the teacher understands their situation. Interestingly, as Payne points out, "two things that help one move out of poverty are education and relationships" (p. 11).


Inclusion of Special Education Students


Special education students also have the right to public education. In 1975, the United States Congress enacted the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (1974) that provided for the free public education to all students with disabilities. However, these students were often placed in classes apart from the general school population. They rarely had any interaction with regular education students except for nonclassroom activities such as lunch and recess, and even then they were segregated somewhat. In 1997, the act was strengthened and given new meaning by enactment of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This act held that special education students should be placed into the least restrictive environment (mainstreamed) or included in the regular education program as much as possible. As a part of this inclusion process, teachers were expected to meet the needs of these students on an individual basis. All of these special needs students are tested and an individual educational program (IEP) is developed in conjunction with the parents, teachers, and the special education department to insure their success in the regular classroom. Teachers should be aware of IDEA and the IEP process, because they greatly affect the classroom (Nelson, Palonsky, & McCarthy, 2007).


Neurological-Based Behavior


Some students have difficulty controlling their behavior in the classroom through no fault of their own; rather, there are neurological dysfunctions which can cause loss of control and unresponsiveness to classic management techniques. Examples of these include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities, bipolar disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, fetal alcohol spectrum syndrome, and injury-related brain disorders. Teachers should be aware of those students in their classroom who fit into this category, know why they behave as they do, and seek alternative techniques of classroom management that are applicable to specific individuals.


Engaging Students in the Learning Process


The National Research Council (2004) theorizes that students engage in learning as a result of three basic conditions. First, students have to believe in their underlying competence to learn and their control over what they are learning; this is the I Can factor. "Students need to know what it takes to succeed and to believe that they can succeed" (p. 35). Their understanding of their competence and expectation of success is also tied to emotions that can either promote or interfere with their engagement in learning activities.


Second, students have to see some intellectual or social value to what they are learning; this is the I Want To factor. Students can be engaged (or not) anywhere on a continuum from believing they are working on an activity in school because they want to do so to feeling as if they are working because they have to do so. Wanting to work is related to self-determination; students may have the idea that an education is important or they take pride in their work or good grades are valued. Having to work is related to coercion. This, obviously, does not contribute to positively engaging students in learning; it can have the opposite effect of driving students away.


Third, students have to recognize their social connectedness to others who are in their learning environment; this is the I Belong factor, which is especially related to the "importance of meaningful relationships with adults and teachers who showed an interest in them [students] as individuals" (National Research Council, 2004, p. 42). Students know when their teachers care about them and this makes a difference in their willingness to be engaged in the learning process. Interestingly, the older students get, the more likely they are less engaged in learning (Brewster & Fagan, 2000). As far as a teacher is able, addressing these three conditions will help, though not guarantee, students increase their active engagement in the learning process and see success as a student.


Although the classroom contains students with many different learning circumstances, there are general practices that teachers can follow to help motivate their students and engage them in the learning process. Most students are eager to learn and it is up to the teacher to enhance these feelings (Good & Brophy, 2003).


Know the students.


The more teachers know about their students, the better they can meet their needs. What are the students' interests and desires? How do they best learn? What is their learning or developmental level? What type of activities will spark their interests? What is their attention span, as individuals and as a collective group? All of these factors should be taken into account when seeking to motivate students to learn or to engage them in learning.


Capture their interests.


Once a teacher knows the students' desires and background, it is important to arouse their curiosity in what will be presented (Brewster & Fagan, 2000). A good anticipatory set will hook the students into wanting to know what comes next. This statement or activity will set the tone of the lesson and the new content. This can be done by posing questions, riddles, problems, etc. This is a good opportunity to draw students into the learning process; a lesson itself can be built around their cultural diversity.


Make it relevant.


What practical needs will the material fulfill? Can students use it in their personal lives? Activities and information should be meaningful and relevant to real-life (Brewster & Fagan, 2000). Teachers should explain why it is important to learn the material and should make abstract material more meaningful by making it concrete and visual. Why is this knowledge useful? It is important to relate and bridge the new material to previous knowledge.


Vary the pace and activities.


Stimulate attention by having students actively involved in the experience through cooperative learning, group projects, question and answer, etc. Ensure that the activities are challenging, but achievable (Brewster & Fagan, 2000). Most students have an attention span of 15−20 minutes. After that time limit, interest is lost. Therefore, a good teacher will change the learning experiences every so often. The more students are actively involved, the more they will learn. Cooperative learning, projects, and other interactive activities ensure that students will continue to be engaged in learning.


Ensure success.


It is helpful to break the instruction into small segments and make sure understanding is accomplished at each step. Do not go on to new material until students totally comprehend each part, especially if the material is complicated in any way.


Praise and reinforcement.


Students do well when they receive honest and sincere praise. This praise not only helps students work harder to learn the material, it also encourages them to behave appropriately. The type of praise used is also very important. In the lower grades, classwide positive recognition works very well. At the upper grades, individual recognition is much more effective. This praise can also be utilized outside the classroom. Positive phone calls to parents or notes home are very effective.


Assessment and adaptation.


The teacher should always be aware of what is happening in the classroom. Adaptations may be needed to meet the students' needs as they are observed. The teacher is constantly adapting, checking for understanding, reflecting, monitoring, and observing reactions. Student body language is very important and must be taken into account. Truly, the teacher should have classroom presence and eyes in the back of the head (Burden, 1995).


Conclusion


Teachers in today's classrooms need to be aware of the needs of their students and know the best way to reach each individual. Cultural, socioeconomic, and developmental diversity must all be taken into account as learning depends upon their skillful management by a teacher. Understanding how to engage students in the learning process can directly impact the quality of the educational environment in the classroom.


References


Brewster, C., & Fager, J. (2000, October). Increasing student engagement and motivation: From time-on-task to homework. Retrieved September 8, 2009, from http://www.nwrel.org/request/oct00/textonly.html#engage


Burden, P . (1995). Classroom management and discipline. White Plains, NY: Longman Group Ltd.


Charles, C. M. (2008). Building classroom discipline (9th ed.). Boston: Pearson/Allen & Bacon.


Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975, Pub. L. No. 94-142 (1975).


Good, T., & Brophy, J. (2003). Looking in classrooms. White Plains, NY: Longman Group Ltd.


Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, Pub. L. No. 105-117 (1997).


National Center for Education Statistics. (2007, September). Table 7.2:Percentage distribution of public elementary and secondary students, by region, state, and race/ethnicity: 2004. Status and Trends in the Education of Racial and Ethnic Minorities. Retrieved September 25, 2008, from http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2007/minoritytrends/tables/table_7_2.asp


National Research Council. (2004). Engaging schools: Fostering high school students' motivation to learn. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.


Nelson, J., Palonsky, S., & McCarthy, M. R. (2007). Critical issues in education−Dialogues and dialectics (6th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.


Payne, R. (1996). A framework for understanding poverty (3rd rev. ed.). Highlands, TX: aha! Process, Inc.


 



Thanks Bernice


This is past due she gave me opportunity to do it over.




 


 

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.
Yes, I can do this for you by the end of tomorrow at the latest. Would that be acceptable to you?
Customer: replied 11 months ago.

Gnaritas;



 


 


 


Bernice:

Customer: replied 11 months ago.

Gnaritas;



 


 


 


Bernice:

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.
Okay.
Customer: replied 11 months ago.

Gnaritas


Did you forget me? I was looking for the PowerPoint on yesterday, Plus I had a another assign for you to do for by tomorrow.


Please let me know where you are with that assignment, And if you will be able to do the other one.


 


Thanks Bernice

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.

My apologies that it took so much time, I did not forget you. Here's the assignment: https://app.box.com/s/jccqi36azvv5lx6kfy10

 

What time is the assignment due for tomorrow?

Customer: replied 11 months ago.

Gnartis;


Thank you it's due tomorrow 11pm your time. can you do it by than for me? please let me know>


 


 


Thanks Bernice

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.

Send me the information as soon as possible then I'll be able to tell you if I can do it. Most likely I'll be able to but send me the information anyway. Thanks.

Customer: replied 11 months ago.

Gnaritas


I am so sorry I am just mow able to send you the Information, let me know what you can get done, It's two assignment perhaps you can at least get one today I hope both if not perhaps tomorrow, let me know.


 


First assignment:


Consider the classroom management strategies you have studied so far in this course and choose five of them.


Write an essay of 1,000-1,250 words in which you:


1. Explain how each of the five strategies you selected is more appropriate for specific developmental levels.


2. Explain how each strategy encourages critical thinking in students.


 


3. Use hypothetical examples to prove your points.
Early Childhood Education students should focus on Birth to Age 5/Pre-K and K to Age 8/Grade 3. Elementary Education students should focus on Grades K-8. Secondary Education students should focus on Grades 7-12. Prepare this assignment according to the APA guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required. Cite in-text and in the References section. This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment





Diversity and Student Engagement







Consider the classroom management strategies you have studied so far in this course and choose five of them.


Write an essay of 1,000-1,250 words in which you:


1. Explain how each of the five strategies you selected is more appropriate for specific developmental levels.


2. Explain how each strategy encourages critical thinking in students.


 


3. Use hypothetical examples to prove your points.
Early Childhood Education students should focus on Birth to Age 5/Pre-K and K to Age 8/Grade 3. Elementary Education students should focus on Grades K-8. Secondary Education students should focus on Grades 7-12. Prepare this assignment according to the APA guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required. Cite in-text and in the References section. This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment.

























Apply Rubrics
Student Diversity and Classroom Management























































































1 Unsatisfactory 0.00%


2 Less Than Satisfactory 65.00%


3 Satisfactory 75.00%


4 Good 85.00%


5 Excellent 100.00%


80.0 %Content


40.0 % Theories and Applicable Developmental Levels


Writer does not apply five theories to specific developmental levels.


Applies some theories to developmental levels, but analysis is elementary.


Writer chooses five theories, applies appropriate developmental level to each, and creates examples but they may not be relevant.


Examples created are suitable to theory and level and indicate general understanding of theories.


Examples plainly indicate a comprehensive understanding of theory as related to developmental level.


40.0 % Encouraging Critical Thinking


Essay does not indicate how theories encourage critical thinking in students.


Essay indicates how some theories encourage critical thinking, but reflection lacks depth of insight.


Essay reflects on how theories encourage critical thinking in students.


Reflections indicate general understanding of theories.


Reflections include anecdotes and indicate a comprehensive understanding of theory.


15.0 %Organization and Effectiveness


5.0 % Argument Logic and Construction


Statement of purpose is not justified by the conclusion. The conclusion does not support the claim made. Argument is in part or wholly incoherent.


Sufficient justification of claims is lacking. Argument lacks consistent unity. There are obvious flaws in the logic.


Argument is orderly, but may have a few inconsistencies. The argument presents minimal justification of claims. Argument logically, but not thoroughly, supports the purpose.


Argument is strong, showing logical progressions. Firm control of the technique of argumentation is evident. Smooth progression of claims.


Clear and convincing argument that presents a persuasive claim in a unique and compelling manner.


5.0 % Language Use and Audience Awareness (includes sentence construction, word choice, etc.)


Inappropriate word choice and/or sentence construction, lack of variety in language use. Writer appears to be unaware of audience. Use of "primer prose" indicates writer either doesn't apply figures of speech or uses them inappropriately.


Some distracting and/or inconsistencies in language choice (register), sentence structure, and/or word choice are present. Sentence structure may be sporadic. The writer exhibits some lack of control in using figures of speech appropriately.


Sentence structure is correct and occasionally varies. Language is appropriate to the targeted audience for the most part.


The writer is clearly aware of audience; uses a variety of sentence structures and appropriate vocabulary for the target audience; uses figures of speech to communicate clearly.


The writer uses a variety of sentence constructions, figures of speech, and word choice in unique and creative ways that are appropriate to purpose, discipline, and scope.


5.0 % Essay Structure, Paragraph Development, and Transitions


Paragraphs and transitions consistently lack unity and coherence. There are no apparent connections between paragraphs. Transitions are inappropriate to purpose and scope. Organization is disjointed.


Some paragraphs and transitions may lack logical progression of ideas, unity, coherence, and/or cohesiveness. Some degree of organization is evident.


Paragraphs are generally competent, but ideas may show some inconsistency in organization and/or in their relationships to each other.


A logical progression of ideas between paragraphs is apparent. Paragraphs exhibit a unity, coherence, and cohesiveness. Topic sentences and concluding remarks are used as appropriate to purpose, discipline, and scope.


There is a sophisticated construction of the essay. Ideas universally progress and relate to each other. The writer has been careful to use paragraph and transition construction to guide the reader.


5.0 %Mechanics and Format


3.0 % Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar)


Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning.


Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader.


Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but are not overly distracting to the reader.


Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present.


Writer is clearly in control of standard, written American English.


1.0 % Evaluating and Documenting Sources (includes use of appropriate style, correct in-text and citation format, etc.)


Plagiarism; rarely follows any documentation format correctly; uses non-credible sources


Uses documentation, but frequent formatting/citation errors are present; some sources have questionable credibility


Sources used are credible and documented appropriately to the discipline; formatting and citation is usually correct, but some lack of control is apparent.


Documentation is appropriate and formatting/citation is correct, although a few errors/typos may be present; most sources are authoritative.


There are virtually no errors in documentation format or citation; all sources are authoritative.




APA format and style are not evident.


Title page is present but missing APA elements. In-text citations, where necessary, are used, but they are formatted inaccurately and/or not referenced.


All key elements of an APA title page are present. In-text citations and a reference section are present with few format errors. Mechanics of writing are reflective of APA style.


Essay elements are theoretically supported with accurate citations and references.


A broad understanding of APA format and style is evident in use of level headings and lists, for example.







 


Reading for the class


 



Diversity and Student Engagement


Introduction



Cultural Diversity


Education in the United States has always been culturally and linguistically diverse, though it tends to reflect the values, traditions, and customs of Caucasian American society (Charles, 2008). Today, it is becoming more so than ever before. Approximately 42% of the school population is comprised of minorities (National Center for Educational Statistics, 2007), including African American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native. It is incumbent upon teachers to recognize the cultural nuances of each of these groups and how they might play out in the classroom.


Socioeconomic Diversity


Many students come from poor families and do not have the resources or the background for traditional educational readiness. Children bring into the classroom the hidden rules of the class into which they are born; if they are born into poverty or find themselves in situational poverty, they are likely to misunderstand the rules of success in a classroom because, for the most part, schools function on the hidden rules of the middle class (Payne, 1996). This can lead to classroom management issues. As teachers understand the rules of the socioeconomic classes within their classroom, they can teach students how to respond appropriately in a school setting. Teachers should seek an understanding of the values, customs, and lifestyles of those who are economically disadvantaged. It will help to build relationships if students know the teacher understands their situation. Interestingly, as Payne points out, "two things that help one move out of poverty are education and relationships" (p. 11).


Inclusion of Special Education Students


Special education students also have the right to public education. In 1975, the United States Congress enacted the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (1974) that provided for the free public education to all students with disabilities. However, these students were often placed in classes apart from the general school population. They rarely had any interaction with regular education students except for nonclassroom activities such as lunch and recess, and even then they were segregated somewhat. In 1997, the act was strengthened and given new meaning by enactment of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This act held that special education students should be placed into the least restrictive environment (mainstreamed) or included in the regular education program as much as possible. As a part of this inclusion process, teachers were expected to meet the needs of these students on an individual basis. All of these special needs students are tested and an individual educational program (IEP) is developed in conjunction with the parents, teachers, and the special education department to insure their success in the regular classroom. Teachers should be aware of IDEA and the IEP process, because they greatly affect the classroom (Nelson, Palonsky, & McCarthy, 2007).


Neurological-Based Behavior


Some students have difficulty controlling their behavior in the classroom through no fault of their own; rather, there are neurological dysfunctions which can cause loss of control and unresponsiveness to classic management techniques. Examples of these include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities, bipolar disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, fetal alcohol spectrum syndrome, and injury-related brain disorders. Teachers should be aware of those students in their classroom who fit into this category, know why they behave as they do, and seek alternative techniques of classroom management that are applicable to specific individuals.


Engaging Students in the Learning Process


The National Research Council (2004) theorizes that students engage in learning as a result of three basic conditions. First, students have to believe in their underlying competence to learn and their control over what they are learning; this is the I Can factor. "Students need to know what it takes to succeed and to believe that they can succeed" (p. 35). Their understanding of their competence and expectation of success is also tied to emotions that can either promote or interfere with their engagement in learning activities.


Second, students have to see some intellectual or social value to what they are learning; this is the I Want To factor. Students can be engaged (or not) anywhere on a continuum from believing they are working on an activity in school because they want to do so to feeling as if they are working because they have to do so. Wanting to work is related to self-determination; students may have the idea that an education is important or they take pride in their work or good grades are valued. Having to work is related to coercion. This, obviously, does not contribute to positively engaging students in learning; it can have the opposite effect of driving students away.


Third, students have to recognize their social connectedness to others who are in their learning environment; this is the I Belong factor, which is especially related to the "importance of meaningful relationships with adults and teachers who showed an interest in them [students] as individuals" (National Research Council, 2004, p. 42). Students know when their teachers care about them and this makes a difference in their willingness to be engaged in the learning process. Interestingly, the older students get, the more likely they are less engaged in learning (Brewster & Fagan, 2000). As far as a teacher is able, addressing these three conditions will help, though not guarantee, students increase their active engagement in the learning process and see success as a student.


Although the classroom contains students with many different learning circumstances, there are general practices that teachers can follow to help motivate their students and engage them in the learning process. Most students are eager to learn and it is up to the teacher to enhance these feelings (Good & Brophy, 2003).


Know the students.


The more teachers know about their students, the better they can meet their needs. What are the students' interests and desires? How do they best learn? What is their learning or developmental level? What type of activities will spark their interests? What is their attention span, as individuals and as a collective group? All of these factors should be taken into account when seeking to motivate students to learn or to engage them in learning.


Capture their interests.


Once a teacher knows the students' desires and background, it is important to arouse their curiosity in what will be presented (Brewster & Fagan, 2000). A good anticipatory set will hook the students into wanting to know what comes next. This statement or activity will set the tone of the lesson and the new content. This can be done by posing questions, riddles, problems, etc. This is a good opportunity to draw students into the learning process; a lesson itself can be built around their cultural diversity.


Make it relevant.


What practical needs will the material fulfill? Can students use it in their personal lives? Activities and information should be meaningful and relevant to real-life (Brewster & Fagan, 2000). Teachers should explain why it is important to learn the material and should make abstract material more meaningful by making it concrete and visual. Why is this knowledge useful? It is important to relate and bridge the new material to previous knowledge.


Vary the pace and activities.


Stimulate attention by having students actively involved in the experience through cooperative learning, group projects, question and answer, etc. Ensure that the activities are challenging, but achievable (Brewster & Fagan, 2000). Most students have an attention span of 15−20 minutes. After that time limit, interest is lost. Therefore, a good teacher will change the learning experiences every so often. The more students are actively involved, the more they will learn. Cooperative learning, projects, and other interactive activities ensure that students will continue to be engaged in learning.


Ensure success.


It is helpful to break the instruction into small segments and make sure understanding is accomplished at each step. Do not go on to new material until students totally comprehend each part, especially if the material is complicated in any way.


Praise and reinforcement.


Students do well when they receive honest and sincere praise. This praise not only helps students work harder to learn the material, it also encourages them to behave appropriately. The type of praise used is also very important. In the lower grades, classwide positive recognition works very well. At the upper grades, individual recognition is much more effective. This praise can also be utilized outside the classroom. Positive phone calls to parents or notes home are very effective.


Assessment and adaptation.


The teacher should always be aware of what is happening in the classroom. Adaptations may be needed to meet the students' needs as they are observed. The teacher is constantly adapting, checking for understanding, reflecting, monitoring, and observing reactions. Student body language is very important and must be taken into account. Truly, the teacher should have classroom presence and eyes in the back of the head (Burden, 1995).


Conclusion


Teachers in today's classrooms need to be aware of the needs of their students and know the best way to reach each individual. Cultural, socioeconomic, and developmental diversity must all be taken into account as learning depends upon their skillful management by a teacher. Understanding how to engage students in the learning process can directly impact the quality of the educational environment in the classroom.


References


Brewster, C., & Fager, J. (2000, October). Increasing student engagement and motivation: From time-on-task to homework. Retrieved September 8, 2009, from http://www.nwrel.org/request/oct00/textonly.html#engage


Burden, P . (1995). Classroom management and discipline. White Plains, NY: Longman Group Ltd.


Charles, C. M. (2008). Building classroom discipline (9th ed.). Boston: Pearson/Allen & Bacon.


Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975, Pub. L. No. 94-142 (1975).


Good, T., & Brophy, J. (2003). Looking in classrooms. White Plains, NY: Longman Group Ltd.


Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, Pub. L. No. 105-117 (1997).


National Center for Education Statistics. (2007, September). Table 7.2:Percentage distribution of public elementary and secondary students, by region, state, and race/ethnicity: 2004. Status and Trends in the Education of Racial and Ethnic Minorities. Retrieved September 25, 2008, from http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2007/minoritytrends/tables/table_7_2.asp


National Research Council. (2004). Engaging schools: Fostering high school students' motivation to learn. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.


Nelson, J., Palonsky, S., & McCarthy, M. R. (2007). Critical issues in education−Dialogues and dialectics (6th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.


Payne, R. (1996). A framework for understanding poverty (3rd rev. ed.). Highlands, TX: aha! Process, Inc.


 


Second Assignment


 


Student Engagement Strategies


You have been asked by your principal to develop a PowerPoint presentation (minimum of 10 slides) on student engagement strategies that can be used for the professional development of first-year teachers. Using the assigned readings for this module, choose eight strategies you believe are critical for engaging students in the learning process.


1. Explain the nature and value of each strategy.


2. Use slide notes where necessary. Be creative in your presentation.


 


While APA format is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected and in-text citations and references should be presented using APA documentation guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful


completion of the assignment





| Diversity and Student Engagement







You have been asked by your principal to develop a PowerPoint presentation (minimum of 10 slides) on student engagement strategies that can be used for the professional development of first-year teachers. Using the assigned readings for this module, choose eight strategies you believe are critical for engaging students in the learning process.


1. Explain the nature and value of each strategy.


2. Use slide notes where necessary. Be creative in your presentation.


 


While APA format is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected and in-text citations and references should be presented using APA documentation guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment.




.



















Apply Rubrics
Student Engagement Strategies







































































1 Unsatisfactory 0.00%


2 Less Than Satisfactory 65.00%


3 Satisfactory 75.00%


4 Good 85.00%


5 Excellent 100.00%


80.0 %Content


60.0 % Engagement Strategies


Presentation does not include summaries of eight strategies.


Strategy summaries are weak or missing key elements.


Summaries of eight engagement strategies are evident, but some are missing an opinion about their value to teachers.


Summaries contain accurate and complete information, and the value of each strategy to teachers is clearly delineated.


Summaries include anecdotes to illustrate each. Values demonstrate higher order thinking.


20.0 % Slide Notes


Slide notes are missing.


Information on each theory is sketchy or completely missing in some cases.


Slide notes are present for all eight strategies; information is somewhat detailed.


Information is clear and concise.


Information is informative and interesting.


10.0 %Presentation


10.0 % PowerPoint Presentation (minimum of 10 slides)


Presentation does not meet minimum slide count or include title and/or reference slides.


Presentation meets minimum slide count, but is missing either a title or reference slide.


Presentation includes all required elements, but lacks creative use of PowerPoint functions.


Presentation uses some design and animation schemes.


Presentation makes maximum use of PowerPoint functions such as design templates, color and animation schemes, and clip art.


10.0 %Mechanics and Format, Organization and Effectiveness


5.0 % Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar)


Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning.


Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader.


Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but are not overly distracting to the reader.


Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present.


Writer is clearly in control of standard, written American English.


3.0 % Language Use and Audience Awareness (includes sentence construction, word choice, etc.)


Inappropriate word choice and/or sentence construction, lack of variety in language use. Writer appears to be unaware of audience. Use of "primer prose" indicates writer either doesn't apply figures of speech or uses them inappropriately.


Some distracting and/or inconsistencies in language choice (register), sentence structure, and/or word choice are present. Sentence structure may be sporadic. The writer exhibits some lack of control in using figures of speech appropriately.


Sentence structure is correct and occasionally varies. Language is appropriate to the targeted audience for the most part.


The writer is clearly aware of audience; uses a variety of sentence structures and appropriate vocabulary for the target audience; uses figures of speech to communicate clearly.


The writer uses a variety of sentence constructions, figures of speech, and word choice in unique and creative ways that are appropriate to purpose, discipline, and scope.


2.0 % Evaluating and Documenting Sources (includes use of appropriate style, correct in-text and citation format, etc.)


Plagiarism; rarely follows any documentation format correctly; uses non-credible sources


Uses documentation, but frequent formatting/citation errors are present; some sources have questionable credibility.


Sources used are credible and documented appropriately to the discipline; formatting and citation is usually correct, but some lack of control is apparent.


Documentation is appropriate and formatting/citation is correct, although a few errors/typos may be present; most sources are authoritative.


There are virtually no errors in documentation format or citation; all sources are authoritative.




 


 






Thanks Bernice





 


 


 

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.

Thank you.

Customer: replied 11 months ago.


Gnaritas:


Was any of the assignments going to get done at all tonight?


Please let me know so that I can say something to my Professor.


 


 


 


Bernice:

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.

Here's the powerpoint portion: https://app.box.com/s/377k8p8st1d2oy6r68m5

 

I'll get on the other part soon.

Customer: replied 11 months ago.

Gnartias:

Ok, Thanks Look to hear from you very soon.

 

My focus is Early Childhood Education students should focus on Birth to Age 5/Pre-K and K to Age 8/Grade 3. Elementary Education students should focus on Grades K-8

 

 

Bernice:

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.

Here's the other part: https://app.box.com/s/jptxq64aug8yzwlq50h3

 

If you need help again please let me know?

Gnaritas, Bachelor's Degree
Category: Writing Homework
Satisfied Customers: 1389
Experience: I am skilled at writing papers from reports to research, also short essays.
Gnaritas and 5 other Writing Homework Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 11 months ago.

Gnartis:


The Pioneer Power that you did , I think something was Missing, The Pioneers was not address, can you please take another look at the assignment for me please. would you like me to post it again it was done This is what the assignment stated.


Using the Building Classroom Discipline reading for this module, choose six classroom management pioneers and create a PowerPoint (minimum of 15 slides) with detailed notes summarizing their respective theories or discipline models.


 


Highlight the specific contribution of each to contemporary classroom management theory.


 


Early Childhood Education students should focus on Age 5/Pre-K to Age 8/Grade 3. Elementary Education students should focus on Grades K-8. Secondary Education students should focus on Grades 7-12.


 


While APA format is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected and in-text citations and references should be presented using APA documentation guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center.


 


This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment


Please help!!!


 


Bernice

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.
Yes, please repost it. I'll take care of it as soon as possible.
Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.

Here's the corrected assignment: https://app.box.com/s/inzrtr0ru3fpsh7t0538

 

Customer: replied 11 months ago.

Gnaritas:


I really need your help I know it's Saturday but I have two other assignment that I am working on please help her is the post for them.


 


Assignment 1








Parental Involvement in Classroom Management

For this assignment, choose the age group that a majority are comfortable with using Grades K-8. Choose one of the following three scenarios:


1. Gina is a docile student who socializes little and is nondisruptive. However, she rarely completes an assignment, especially one that is her part in a group project, which frustrates her teammates.


2. Susan participates in class activities and completes her homework. However, she talks constantly and is disruptive during lesson time.


3. Jerry, larger and louder than his classmates, wants to be the center of attention and has found his niche in clowning around and intimidation. He makes wise remarks, talks back, and is known for verbally destroying his classmates, who alternately find him comical and frightening.


As the teacher, write a letter to the student's parents describing the problem, its ramifications for the student and the classroom, and your proposed solution. Seek their support.


1. Post your letter to the CLC group for evaluation. Each CLC group member should critique the others' letters.


2. Redo your letter based on CLC feedback.


 


3. Write a reflection of 250 words on the process. What did you learn from the process that will help you as a classroom teacher?
Use solid writing skill in the construction of your letter and your reflective paragraph. Each member of the group should submit his or her initial and adjusted letters, as well as the reflection, with a title page. While APA format is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected and in-text citations and references should be presented using APA documentation guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment.


 


This is my letter.


Westover Park Junior High School
Mathematics Department
August 12, 2013

Mr. & Mrs. Smith,


My name isXXXXX and I am the 8th Grade Math Teacher at Westover. I wanted to take some time to communicate a few very important matters regarding Jerry’s performance in my class. More importantly, I would like for us to find ways to work together so that all of us can witness and experience the success that Jerry is capable of. It is still early enough in the semester for us to address these matters so that his progress is not impeded.


Observations and Concerns


Jerry is extremely talkative and tends to initiate and participate in conversations while classroom instruction is taking place. I have spoken with him about this and he agreed that he would not continue to be disruptive. Additionally, engaging in conversation during instruction does not give him the opportunity to grasp some of the more challenging concepts we are covering and ultimately he ends up needing additional assistance because he was not paying attention. During our last conversation I told him that my next option would be to change his seating arrangements and place him in an area that would allow him to focus and not disrupt or be disrupted. He asked for a second chance and I agreed. Please reiterate to Jerry the importance of paying attention in class, taking good notes and not speaking outside of group discussions unless it is relevant to the task at hand.


Also, XXXXX XXXXXkes to be the center of attention and makes many outbursts including cracking jokes which delays my ability to instruct. This also affects the other students who are paying attention. Last week, I administered a chapter review examination and his score was 47%. This score has created a letter grade drop from a C- to a D. Jerry asked if he could make up the exam and I told him he could not. The issue lies with him paying attention and not being disruptive. Once he is able to resolve these issues, I am hopeful that he will bring his math grade up significantly. I offered to provide him with some tutoring services during the after school program sessions and he declined. I am informing you in advance that if the disruptions continue, his seat will be moved and he will be isolated from the rest of his peers. There were also two other students that he tends to engage in disruptive behavior with and since I have spoken to them, their behavior has improved. Jerry on the other hand tends to be inconsistent in his attempts to stay on track. Let’s plan to have a conference in about two weeks so we can discuss where we are and next steps if necessary. Again, Jerry can reverse his current grade situation before it goes down any further. I appreciate your assistance in this matter and I look forward to our follow-up conversation. I am available before school on Tuesday & Thursdays from 7:15 am to 7:45 am and after school on the same days from 3:00 – 4:00 pm. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions or concerns and let me know which time will work best for you.


Bernice Richmond


8th Grade Math Teacher


Westover Park Junior High


 


This is the rubic,



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You do not have permissions to perform this activity





Assignment
Week 7 | Building Trust Relationships

Current All







Due Date: Aug 18, 2013 23:59:59 Max Points: 40
Details:

For this assignment, choose the age group that a majority are comfortable with using Grades K-8. Choose one of the following three scenarios:


1. Gina is a docile student who socializes little and is nondisruptive. However, she rarely completes an assignment, especially one that is her part in a group project, which frustrates her teammates.


2. Susan participates in class activities and completes her homework. However, she talks constantly and is disruptive during lesson time.


3. Jerry, larger and louder than his classmates, wants to be the center of attention and has found his niche in clowning around and intimidation. He makes wise remarks, talks back, and is known for verbally destroying his classmates, who alternately find him comical and frightening.


As the teacher, write a letter to the student's parents describing the problem, its ramifications for the student and the classroom, and your proposed solution. Seek their support.


1. Post your letter to the CLC group for evaluation. Each CLC group member should critique the others' letters.


2. Redo your letter based on CLC feedback.


 


3. Write a reflection of 250 words on the process. What did you learn from the process that will help you as a classroom teacher?
Use solid writing skill in the construction of your letter and your reflective paragraph. Each member of the group should submit his or her initial and adjusted letters, as well as the reflection, with a title page. While APA format is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected and in-text citations and references should be presented using APA documentation guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment.










Final Submission















Apply Rubrics
Parental Involvement in Classroom Management



































































1 Unsatisfactory 0.00%


2 Less Than Satisfactory 65.00%


3 Satisfactory 75.00%


4 Good 85.00%


5 Excellent 100.00%


80.0 %Content


20.0 % Initial Letter


Initial letter does not address one of the three scenarios.


Letter describes problem, but does not indicate its classroom ramifications or present a solution.


Letter describes problem and classroom ramifications, and solution is workable.


Ramifications indicate general understanding of how an individual's behavior affects learning environment. Solution is somewhat creative.


Solution indicates clear understanding of classroom management principles.


40.0 % Revised Letter


Revised letter does not address one of the three scenarios.


Letter describes problem and indicates its classroom ramifications, but its solution is unworkable.


Letter clearly describes problem and classroom ramifications, and solution is workable.


Ramifications indicate clear understanding of how an individual's behaviors affects learning environment. Solution is somewhat creative.


Solution is innovative and indicates clear understanding of classroom management principles.


20.0 % Reflection on Process


Reflection not included.


Reflection is present, but does not include how collaboration process can help a teacher.


Reflection includes how collaboration process can help a teacher.


Content indicates understanding of the value of collaboration.


Content indicates depth of insight and critical thinking.


10.0 %Mechanics, Format, Organization, and Effectiveness


10.0 % Participation in CLC


Does not post initial letter in CLC discussion forum.


Letter is posted, but student does not critique any other group members' letter.


Student critiques group members' letters.


Critiques are presented in a non-critical manner and point out either strengths or weaknesses, but not both.


Critiques are insightful and point out strengths and weaknesses.


5.0 % Language Use and Audience Awareness (includes sentence construction, word choice, etc.)


Inappropriate word choice and/or sentence construction, lack of variety in language use. Writer appears to be unaware of audience. Use of "primer prose" indicates writer either doesn't apply figures of speech or uses them inappropriately.


Some distracting and/or inconsistencies in language choice (register), sentence structure, and/or word choice are present. Sentence structure may be sporadic. The writer exhibits some lack of control in using figures of speech appropriately.


Sentence structure is correct and occasionally varies. Language is appropriate to the targeted audience for the most part.


The writer is clearly aware of audience; uses a variety of sentence structures and appropriate vocabulary for the target audience; uses figures of speech to communicate clearly.


The writer uses a variety of sentence constructions, figures of speech, and word choice in unique and creative ways that are appropriate to purpose, discipline, and scope.


5.0 % Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar)


Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning.


Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader.


Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but are not overly distracting to the reader.


Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present.


Writer is clearly in control of standard, written American English.


100 % Total Weightage





SECOND ASSIGNMENT


Create a brochure that you might use as a tool to teach respect, self-discipline, and responsibility to your students at the beginning of the school year.


 


1. In your brochure, clearly identify those skills students need to learn that will help them manage their behavior.


2. Be creative in designing your brochure.


 


Early Childhood Education students should focus on Birth to Age 5/Pre-K and K to Age8/Grade 3. Elementary Education students should focus on Grades K-8. Secondary Education students should focus on Grades 7-12.


 


You may use the link recommended in the Readings to download a "business brochure" template from Microsoft or you may use another template of your choosing. If you have Microsoft Publisher, there are templates for brochures available in it. You can also create brochures with Microsoft Word using the columns and draw features.


 


APA format is not required, but solid academic writing is expected.


 


This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment.


 



Warning

You do not have permissions to perform this activity





Assignment
Week 7 | Building Trust Relationships

Current All







Due Date: Aug 18, 2013 23:59:59 Max Points: 60
Details:

Create a brochure that you might use as a tool to teach respect, self-discipline, and responsibility to your students at the beginning of the school year.


 


1. In your brochure, clearly identify those skills students need to learn that will help them manage their behavior.


2. Be creative in designing your brochure.


 


Early Childhood Education students should focus on Birth to Age 5/Pre-K and K to Age8/Grade 3. Elementary Education students should focus on Grades K-8. Secondary Education students should focus on Grades 7-12.


 


You may use the link recommended in the Readings to download a "business brochure" template from Microsoft or you may use another template of your choosing. If you have Microsoft Publisher, there are templates for brochures available in it. You can also create brochures with Microsoft Word using the columns and draw features.


 


APA format is not required, but solid academic writing is expected.


 


This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment.


 




Please Note: Assignment will not be submitted to the faculty member until the "Submit" button under "Final Submission" is clicked.









TitleAttached DocumentsTurnitin ReportSimilarity IndexFinal Submission
Click 'New Attempt' to start assignment or attach documents















Apply Rubrics
Teaching Standards of Behavior















































1 Unsatisfactory 0.00%


2 Less than Satisfactory 65.00%


3 Satisfactory 75.00%


4 Good 85.00%


5 Excellent 100.00%


100.0 %Content


78.0 % Teaching Standards of Behavior (respect, self-discipline, and responsibility)


Brochure does not identify any of the required standards of behavior.


Brochure indicates at least two standards of behavior, but they are presented weakly.


Brochure develops classroom standards for all three behaviors.


The value of at least one standard to both the class and the teacher is delineated.


The value of all standards to both the class and the teacher is clearly indicated.


10.0 % Brochure Presentation


Writer does not present deliverable as a brochure.


Brochure is either bi-fold or tri-fold.


Brochure is either bi-fold or tri-fold; two-sided; some creativity is evident in presentation.


Use of varied color, fonts, and clip art is evident.


Brochure is of high enough quality to be able to be used in a real-world setting.


6.0 % Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar)


Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning.


Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader.


Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but are not overly distracting to the reader.


Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present.


Writer is clearly in control of standard, written American English.


6.0 % Language Use and Audience Awareness (includes sentence construction, word choice, etc.)


Inappropriate word choice and/or sentence construction, lack of variety in language use. Writer appears to be unaware of audience. Use of primer prose indicates writer either doesn’t apply figures of speech or uses them inappropriately.


Some distracting and/or inconsistencies in language choice (register), sentence structure, and/or word choice are present. Sentence structure may be sporadic. The writer exhibits some lack of control in using figures of speech appropriately.


Sentence structure is correct and occasionally varies. Language is appropriate to the targeted audience for the most part.


The writer is clearly aware of audience; uses a variety of sentence structures and appropriate vocabulary for the target audience; uses figures of speech to communicate clearly.


The writer uses a variety of sentence constructions, figures of speech, and word choice in unique and creative ways that are appropriate to purpose, discipline, and scope.


100 % Total Weightage

ectronic Resource1. Business Brochure (8 ½ x 11, Landscape, 2-Fold)

Use the "Business Brochure (8 1/2 x 11, Landscape, 2-Fold)" template, located on the Microsoft Office online website, to complete the "Teaching Standards of Behavior" assignment.


http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/templates/TC062062991033.aspx?CategoryID=CT101043031033




Please let me know Bernice: as always it's due Tomorrow Sunday


 


Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.
Hey Bernice, I'm not sure if I'll be able to get this assignment done for you today. I just now got your post. How many pages or words is it and is this all the information I need to get it done? What time is it due today?
Customer: replied 11 months ago.

Gnaritas:

I sorry that I am just getting back to you, Yeas you do have all of the necessary Information except the Lecture I am posting it now, The Reflection letter it is only 250 words, I posted the letter that I wrote to do the reflection letter, about , Create a brochure, you have all of the necessary information for that assignment as well. I am posting the

Lecture Information now Let me know if you can not finish the brochure as least the reflection for me, The brochure first if possible than the reflection later by tomorrow, I am working on some other parts of the other assignment.

 

Lecture

Building Trust Relationships

Introduction

Good teacher−student relationships are essential to ensure a positive school and classroom atmosphere. It is a commonly held axiom within the education field that most students "don't care how much you know, until they know how much you care." The most essential element in this relationship is to convey to students that they are important and valuedas individuals.

Developing Relationships With Students

Teachers meet their students on the first day of school and neither knows much about the other. First impressions are very important. As students arrive into the classroom, the teacher is prepared, excited, and enthusiastic. The room is ready for them. The teacher is dressed as a professional and has developed the lesson plan for the first day. The feeling of warmth and friendliness is a major factor in developing this trust relationship. Classroom management techniques immediately come into play. The seating arrangement has already been planned and students are instructed how to find their proper seat. Class begins immediately, and the entire period is spent as the teacher has planned.

Most students have had positive relationships with past teachers and will tend to carry this feeling over to other teachers. However, it takes time to develop a trusting relationship with someone, especially if the student has had a poor experience in the past. The key is to demonstrate to all the students that respect for them, and concern for their welfare and success, is utmost in the mind of the teacher. Gone are the days when respect was give automatically simply due to the title teacher. Respect has to be earned. As the year progresses, good relationships will develop if the teacher adapts these guiding principles (Wong & Wong, 1998) laid out in the following paragraphs:

Appearance

Students are looking for someone they can respect, a solid role model. This starts with appearance. Teachers' personal hygiene and professional attire send a message to everyone; clean, neat and professional should dictate a teacher's appearance. Each situation and school is different, and teachers should dress according to the environment and the activities which will take place. For example, a primary teacher who is working with students in activity areas and who tends to be engaged in rug activities would wear clothing different from what would be worn during parent/teacher conferences. Teachers do not have to wear a suit or dress every day, but good teachers know what is appropriate for the situation and activities. Finally, it behooves teacher candidates to be aware of the school administration's policy for teacher appearance.

Personality and Emotions

Personality and emotions also play an important part in developing relationships with students. A calm consistent personality is an important asset. A well-run lesson is one in which the teacher displays a variety of presentation skills including voice modulation, and appropriate body language, gestures, and movement. Tone and verbal expressions should be appropriate for the setting and the situation. A good teacher is also a good actor or actress; this helps to keep the lesson exciting and interesting. Teachers can express disappointment in actions taken by their students, but anger and ridicule should never be displayed. Teacher temper tantrums are completely out of the question; they tend to raise the level of anxiety which can lead to students becoming angry and causing even greater disturbances. Professional ethics and demeanor should be practiced at all times.

Communication

Good communication skills are important when developing relationships with students. When speaking, teachers should be conscious of speed, volume, diction, and the use of idiomatic expressions. Student facial expressions and other mannerisms will convey to the teacher how well the lesson or presentation is being accepted; changing the method of delivery may be needed to maintain interest. When using the chalk board, overheads or hand outs, ensure spelling and grammar is correct. The size of the font should be such that everyone can read it comfortably. Any written correspondence should, on its face, appear professionally written. People judge teachers by what they perceive and what they receive from the teacher. Teaching in a school where a second language is the norm, letters may need to be sent in other languages. A good teacher knows the audience and makes appropriate adaptations (Amatea, 2009).

Professionalism

In some ways, a teacher is much like a second parent. Friendliness is needed, but too much familiarity can be harmful to the student and to the teacher. Teachers should seek to know as much as they can about individual students so that they can better formulate lessons to meet their varied needs. Likewise, students want and need to know the teacher as a person, not just a figurehead in class (Burden, 1995). A professional working relationship is established with boundaries between students and teachers. Personal stories and experiences can be shared with students but teachers should only use these when proving a point or enhancing a lesson.

Care and Compassion

Students have many experiences outside of school which can lead to an inability to concentrate in school. As trust relationships grow, teachers should become more and more aware of any change in attitude or behavior which might give them clues that something is wrong or different. It is important to let students know of a willingness to help, but not to pry, as well as to let them know how much you care about their well-being and their future. Students will relate incidents that they want to share, but others may be embarrassing and troublesome; teachers should know when to leave well enough alone. Finally, when teachers use the words please and thank you, and flash a warm smile, students know their teachers care for them.

Beyond the Classroom

Teachers should observe students outside the classroom. Many students behave differently when they are in a familiar environment with their peers. Leadership qualities may be displayed during lunch or recess that are not apparent in the classroom. Extracurricular activities and sporting events also are an opportunity for teachers to see student talents and abilities in another venue. The mere presence of a teacher at a student event builds trust relationships as students perceive that teachers are really interested in them. This is also a golden opportunity to meet and speak with parents (Canter, 2006).

Attitude

While good teachers are supportive of students and concerned about their success and well-being, they should also exhibit the attitude that they are proud and pleased to be a teacher. Positive and high expectations of one's self will help create trust relationships with students.

Working With Parents

Parental support is vital for solid educational programs. Many students indicate that the two most important and influential groups in their lives are their parents and their teachers. Good teachers work at promoting a positive relationship with the parents of their students, so that students can succeed and parents can participate in that success. Some of the ways teachers can promote parental involvement include:

  • Communicate with parents. Unfortunately, seldom does a parent receive a call from a teacher or school except when a problem exists. Positive phone calls are a technique master teachers use often. Prior to the beginning of the school year, a call from the teacher is helpful to establishing relationships with parents. During that initial call, it is important to include a personal introduction. Other items to cover might include (a) a request for basic information about the student, (b) teacher contact information, (c) interests of the student and how the student best learns from the parent's perspective, and (d) teacher concern for the success of the student.
  • Show parents how to help their student at home. Many parents do not know how to help with their student's lessons or homework. Practical tips on how to help are appreciated by parents (e.g., how to set up homework areas and what to do if the student has a question the parent cannot answer).
  • Promote the idea that success in school is important for the future. Teachers should be aware of the cultural factors that influence parental feelings about education and respond to them appropriately. Teachers can encourage attendance policies and the value of attendance on a regular basis. Too many absences can be detrimental to learning.
  • Care about the student. Show parents that the best interest of their child is of utmost importance to the teacher. Take every opportunity to show commitment to and confidence in the child.
  • Invite parents to come to school. Having an open classroom where parents are invited to participate, assist, etc., can go far in establishing a vibrant relationship with parents. Parents can read to students, monitor lunch, act as an aide for the teacher, chaperone field trips, grade papers, etc. They are an excellent resource for teachers. A positive relationship with them can only benefit the teacher and the class.

Conclusion

Building trust with students is very important and takes time. Trust between teacher and students can make or break a year for both. Parents can help in many ways as long as the teacher has reached out to them and drawn them into the classroom. Parents and teachers could consider their relationship to be a partnership formed to help the success of the student (Canter & Canter, 1991).

References

Amatea, E. S. (2009). Building culturally responsive family-school relationships. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

Burden, P. R. (1995). Classroom management and discipline. White Plains, NY: Longman Publishers.

Canter, L. (2006) Classroom management for academic success. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree.

Canter, L., & Canter, M. (1991). Parents on your side: A comprehensive parent involvement program for teachers. Santa Monica, CA: Lee Canter & Associates.

Wong, H. K., & Wong, R. T. (1998). The first days of school: How to be an effective teacher. Mountain View, CA: Harry K. Wong Publications, Inc.

 

Thanks,Bernice

 

 

Customer: replied 11 months ago.

Gnaritas


Did You get my post I sent it early today? Please let me know.


It's due at 11pm.


 


 


Thanks


Bernice:

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.
I'll do my best to finish it by the deadline. If you don't hear from me by 8:30 I may not be able to get finished.
Customer: replied 11 months ago.

Gnaritas


The deadline was yesterday, I am already late I got to get the entire assignment in, I have done the Reflection assignment, all I need now is the brochure, do you think that you can do that for me?


Please let me know.


 


 


Thanks Bernice

Expert:  Gnaritas replied 11 months ago.
My apologies, I will not be able to complete the brochure in time.

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