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Dr. B.
Dr. B., Board Certified Veterinarian
Category: Veterinary
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Experience:  General practice veterinary surgeon with extensive experience in a wide range of species.
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Chihuahua ayte about 1/4 or less of a small dcon block

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Chihuahua ayte about 1/4 or less of a small dcon block

Hello, I am Dr. B, a licensed veterinarian and I would like to help you with your wee one today.


How long ago did he ingest this?

What is his body weight?
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

30 minutes or so


 


8 lbs + _

Thank you for the further information.

I have to say that it is a shame that this much time has already gone by. This may mean that he will be at serious risk here from this very toxic form of poison. Thirty minutes tends to be our time frame where there has been significant posion absorption and adverse signs will likely be seen and need to be managed.

Still since we are on that cusp, it would still be useful to induce vomiting now to limit any more absorption. To induce vomiting at home, you can administer 3% hydrogen peroxide orally at a dose of 1ml per pound. (2 teaspoons per 10 pounds of body weight). You can give it via dropper, syringe, turkey baster -- just we want to give it orally and get into your dog. After giving this orally, move the abdomen around or get him to walk about to get things mixing. This should usually lead to vomiting. If it is unsuccessful after 10 minutes then it can be repeated once more (though if you need a second dose, give it but get on the road to your ER vet once it is in). Because if we still have no vomiting, then he will need to see the ER vet so that the vet can administer apomorhpine (a very strong injectable emetic) to just get the d-con out and limit any adverse issues for him.

I will discuss the seriousness of this intoxication in a moment, but wanted to get this information to you so that you can get to work on damage control for him. If you want to get him to the ER vet (a very reasonable choice since he will already have absorption and need to see them for treatment anyway), you can find one local to you, HERE and @ http://www.vetlocator.com/.

Dr. B.

Customer: replied 4 years ago.

It seems hd only got a taste had chewed annd crumbled it up didn, t get much

Hi again,

It does not take much to cause a toxicity. And with him being a small breed dog, any dose is likely to have an adverse effect on him. So, I would still strongly advise that you need to be very proactive here to make sure he doesn't end up bleeding into his lungs or worse.

While you are inducing vomiting, I will explain the seriousness of this intoxication further. Now as I am sure you can appreciate d-con is a very good pesticide. It kills rats and mice by preventing them from clotting their blood. The reason that this is is such a big deal is because our bodies experience little bleeds throughout the day that we do not even know are happening (since the body's clotting factors/agents stop the bleed before it causes us any issue). But if rat bait is on board then the body will not be able to clot. Then these little bleeds become significant and we end up with dead rats. And for dogs who ingest rat bait, we can see the same fate if we don't intervene.

In regards XXXXX XXXXX inducing vomiting to remove any remaining poison from the stomach is the first step. From there, we may administer activated charcoal (LINK) to absorb any lingering toxin in the stomach. Once we have the toxin in the stomach contents addressed, we have to focus on their clotting abilities. In most cases, a blood sample is taken to get a baseline level on the dog's ability to clot. They are then treated with Vitamin K to for a few weeks (exact time frame is dependent on the generation of the poison) to aid their clotting abilities. Dogs will serious intoxications will sometimes need transfusions of platelet rich plasma to ensure they continue to clot while their body flushes the toxin out. After therapy, a clotting profile may be rechecked to ensure they are back to normal.

Overall, while I could calculate out the dose that would be fatal for your dog, that would not be the best use of our time. Rather we need to act quickly here to remove as much remaining poison from his system and getting him on prophylactic treatment to ensure he has not poisoned himself with enough rat bait to be fatal for him.

And just in case you do not know where your local ER vet is you can check HERE and @ http://www.vetlocator.com/.


Dr. B.

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Dr. B. and other Veterinary Specialists are ready to help you

While you are inducing vomiting, I will explain the seriousness of this intoxication further. Now as I am sure you can appreciate d-con is a very good pesticide. It kills rats and mice by preventing them from clotting their blood. The reason that this is is such a big deal is because our bodies experience little bleeds throughout the day that we do not even know are happening (since the body's clotting factors/agents stop the bleed before it causes us any issue). But if rat bait is on board then the body will not be able to clot. Then these little bleeds become significant and we end up with dead rats. And for dogs who ingest rat bait, we can see the same fate if we don't intervene.

In regards XXXXX XXXXX inducing vomiting to remove any remaining poison from the stomach is the first step. From there, we may administer activated charcoal
(LINK) to absorb any lingering toxin in the stomach. Once we have the toxin in the stomach contents addressed, we have to focus on their clotting abilities. In most cases, a blood sample is taken to get a baseline level on the dog's ability to clot. They are then treated with Vitamin K to for a few weeks (exact time frame is dependant on the generation of the poison) to aid their clotting abilities. Dogs will serious intoxications will sometimes need transfusions of platelet rich plasma to ensure they continue to clot while their body flushes the toxin out. After therapy, a clotting profile may be rechecked to ensure they are back to normal.


Thank you for your kind accept.

(apologies for what appears to be a wee double posting hiccup on the website).

 

 

Best of luck with your wee lad,

Dr. B.

Hi,

I'm just following up on our conversation about your pet. How is everything going?

nekovet

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