How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Dr. Christian K. Your Own Question
Dr. Christian K.
Dr. Christian K., Veterinarian
Category: Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 10146
Experience:  12 year of veterinary experience in surgery, medicine and behavior
Type Your Veterinary Question Here...
Dr. Christian K. is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

Why is my dog now peeing all over the house when he didnt

This answer was rated:

Why is my dog now peeing all over the house when he didn't before? I do now have another dog who also has accidents some, but now my male dog is peeing all over. I know it must be related to marking territory, but I think it might also be his age (he's a 9 year old bullmastiff). More importantly, what can I do to make it stop?!! I can't stand it anymore!


This is Dr. Christian

  • Does he have any other symptoms- weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy?
  • Is he neutered?
  • Does he drink a lot of water?
Customer: replied 7 years ago.
He has lost some weight, which initially was a good thing. Now I don't know. He has always been on the lethargic side...or at least not a very active dog. He is neutered. I have not noticed a change in his water consumption.

When we trace back the start of the problem, it seemed to start once we put an area rug in both the family room and living room and the other dog had a few accidents there. We then realized that he was actually having a lot of the "accidents" that we would discover. We could tell the difference because his wet spots would always be next to something...he was lifting his leg. The other dog (a female) would live a smaller puddle in the middle of the floor. She is a Boggle, or Boston Terrier/Beagle mix...and has been the source of many problems since we got her! Never had a problem with the bullmastiff until now.

Before assuming this is a behavioral problem I think it best to make sure that it is not a medical condition, especially in light of possible weight loss. Here are some possibilties for medical conditions:


  • Urinary Tract Infection- Urinary tract infections may cause blood to appear in the urine and are more common in female dogs. Symptoms include painful urination, having to urinate more often in smaller amounts and drinking more water. Urinalysis and sometimes a urine culture are necessary to diagnose an infection. Antibiotics are necessary to clear the problem. It would be less likely in this case considering he is male.
  • Diabetes- The increased sugar in the urine causes the need to urinate more often and hence the need to drink more. Bloodwork is necessary to diagnose it and many dogs eat well but lose weight. It is treatable with insulin injections. This is a strong possibility. Here's a link:
  • Liver Disease- There are many different causes of liver disease. Bloodwork is necessary to start and then more tests may be needed to pinpoint the actual cause. Treatment depends on the cause. Usually there are other symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea.
  • Cushing's Disease- This is an increase of steroids in the body that causes the symptoms you are seeing. Blood tests can diagnose the problem and treatment is possible but it is generally very expensive. Here's a link:'s+disease
  • Addison's Disease- This is a problem with the adrenal gland. It is treatable with medications and specific blood tests are necessary to diagnose it. Here's a link:

There are other possibilities as well but they are less common. Bloodwork and an urinalysis are the first step to diagnosing the problem. If everything looks good on the tests then you can probably assume this is a behavioral problem. If you have more questions please let me know.

Dr. Christian K. and other Veterinary Specialists are ready to help you

Related Veterinary Questions