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Thomas Judge
Thomas Judge, solicitor Advocate
Category: UK Property Law
Satisfied Customers: 32826
Experience:  award winning lawyer with over 15 years experience
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My nanny and her husband have been renting a flat from a person wh

Customer Question

Hi, my nanny and her husband have been renting a flat from a person who was renting directly from the landlord and sharing the flat with her. They have no contract but have paid monthly rent through bank transfer. After refusing a rent increasing without having evidence that the landlord himself was asking for it, they went on holidays and came back finding changed locks. They are now told they need to pick up things tonight and leaving immediately. What are their rights? Shall they call the police?
Thank you
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: UK Property Law
Expert:  Thomas Judge replied 1 year ago.
The difficulty is determining whether they have a tenancy or merely a licence agreement. If the latter then landlords can change the locks but only after giving reasonable notice. If the view is that they do have a tenancy then to be evicted in this fashion would be against the law under the Protection of Eviction Act. It is correct that you do not need a tenancy in writing to have an agreement. I would be minded to contact the head landlord and make him aware of the concerns about what has happened and invite him to remove the other tenant in place of your nanny. I would also call the police but they may (wrongly) consider it to be a civil matter.

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