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Jo C.
Jo C., Barrister
Category: UK Property Law
Satisfied Customers: 69380
Experience:  Over 5 years in practice.
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If a tenant doesnt pay council tax and then runs away without

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If a tenant doesn't pay council tax and then runs away without also paying the rent, can council come after landlord for the council tax if council tax wasn't landlord's responsibility while tenant was there and the landlord was not aware that tenant didn't pay council tax?
Hi

Thank you for your question. My name is XXXXX XXXXX I will try to help with this.

Was the tenant on an AST please?
Customer: replied 3 years ago.


Yes. What would be the difference if not?

I am sorry for the delay. I lost my connection.

Yes, it would make a difference to a degree. There is a hierarchy of liable persons for council tax. The tenant is generally the primary target depending on the type of contract he is on. Those tenants on ASTs or periodics who have exclusive possession of the property are usually the preferred target for the Council.

The landlord is only liable as a rule if the tenant is on something like a HMO or some other fairly fluid tenancy agreement.

The Council will consider the landlord liable if the tenant has not been registered as the liable person for council tax though.

If you are the landlord and you do have to pay though then you can always sue the tenant at the small claims court to recover.

Can I clarify anything for you?

Jo
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