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Thomas, Lawyer
Category: UK Property Law
Satisfied Customers: 7430
Experience:  BA (Hons), PgDip, Practising Solicitor
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i have no business lease on property that i rent from a landlord.

Customer Question

i have no business lease on property that i rent from a landlord. i have been here for at least 4 years and always paid on time with records to show this. do i have any rights?
Submitted: 5 years ago.
Category: UK Property Law
Expert:  Thomas replied 5 years ago.


Thanks for your question.

If you do not have a lease then you are occupying the properyt on either a licence or tenancy at will. This means that you have a right of occupation of the premises but the landlord could recover possession of the property by applying to Court for an order after serving you "reasonable notice". In view of the length of time you have been there this would be 1-2 months.


If you wish to have security of tenure you should negotiate the terms of a lease and then have one drafted to execute.



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Customer: replied 5 years ago.

so would the landlord have to give us notice first then if we do not leave the premises after this notice period then she has to apply for a court order to make us move?


additionally, does the notice she gives us have to be in writing or just verbal?





Expert:  Thomas replied 5 years ago.



Your first statement is correct.


A verbal notice may suffice but they would have to prepare a Witness Statement attesting to it.


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