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Thomas, Lawyer
Category: UK Property Law
Satisfied Customers: 7430
Experience:  BA (Hons), PgDip, Practising Solicitor
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my partner has been sent an occupiers waiver form reference

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my partner has been sent an occupiers waiver form reference my remortgage, i understand this means them giving their consent to the mortgage and that they would have to leave the property if it got reposessed, but there is a guarantors covenant section which i dont understand... help???

Does it look like a standard form document?


Who is the lender?


Has your lender actually asked for a guarantor to your mortgage? You would know if they have?


Customer: replied 5 years ago.
I've never seen one before it's just text on an A4 sheet, the lender is Nationwide. No they haven't asked for a guarantor. Does this section need to be filled in? Regards Kerry



That's Nationwide's standard form mortgage deed - they include the guarantor part whether or not you actually have a guarantor. It is not a bespoke document unfortunately.


If you do not have a guarantor then you do not need to complete that part. If you are in any doubt about whether they require a guarantor then give them a telephone call.


Get your partner to execute the occupiers section and return it to them. You will then be able to them. This will suffice.


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Kind regards,


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