How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Ben Jones Your Own Question
Ben Jones
Ben Jones, UK Lawyer
Category: UK Law
Satisfied Customers: 9035
Experience:  Qualified Solicitor - Please start your question with 'For Ben Jones'
29905560
Type Your UK Law Question Here...
Ben Jones is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

Am endeavouring to complete (as Landlord) a Licence to

Customer Question

Am endeavouring to complete (as Landlord) a Licence to Occupy land with an Animal Charity. Have been advised by their Solicitor that the Charity�s records with the Charity Commission have been updated but no corresponding legal documentation in support has been completed. There is now no full and proper trail/documentary evidence of appointments/retirements leading up to the appointment of the current trustees. Does this situation need to be regularised before completing the Licence to Occupy?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: UK Law
Expert:  Stuart J replied 1 year ago.

Good afternoon. My name is ***** ***** it’s my pleasure to help you with this today.

Is your concern that whoever is going to sign the license does not have the authority act as such on behalf of the charity?

Do you have it in writing that the records have been updated? What proof do you have of that?

When you say no corresponding legal documentation in support been completed, do you mean that the solicitor has not got it from the Charities Commission and therefore cannot send it to you?

As much background as possible is really useful please. Thank you

Please bear with me today and over the weekend because I will be online off-line spasmodically and therefore, I may not get back to you immediately. Thank you

Related UK Law Questions