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Ben Jones
Ben Jones, UK Lawyer
Category: UK Law
Satisfied Customers: 9070
Experience:  Qualified Solicitor - Please start your question with 'For Ben Jones'
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Is an authenticated title "in hand" which according to ucc

Customer Question

Is an authenticated title "in hand" which according to ucc is equal with the original, still just an interest ? or is it simple title not beholden to the crown any longer as they are no longer trustees but equals in title right. And since they are a fiction and can not make a claim the man holding the authentic title is the dominion holder or "owner" So how is this claim made and is their a process today equal to a writ of livery?
Submitted: 1 year ago via InBrief.
Category: UK Law
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
And I don't mean just an order to show cause but how to command a true bill for a compelled accounting of the estate name trading accounts for all cusips and account control over to the executor for final disbursement to the heirs
Expert:  Stuart J replied 1 year ago.
Thank you for the question. It is my pleasure to help you with this today. Please bear with me if I ask for more information.
You seem to have a lot of legal jargon in here which hasn’t been used for a long time in the UK if at all.
Is this indeed in the UK?
Could you explain the situation in detail rather than letters have a hypothetical question because it’s very difficult to answer a hypothetical question and from what you have described here, it’s actually impossible. Thank you

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