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Thomas, Lawyer
Category: UK Law
Satisfied Customers: 7430
Experience:  BA (Hons), PgDip, Practising Solicitor
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I have a daughter born 2002 and I am registered as the father

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I have a daughter born 2002 and I am registered as the father on the birth certificate. I subsequently married her mother in 2004, but we have since divorced although I continue to have regular access to my daughter and have done since we separated.
Do I have parental responsibility or will I need to apply formally for it?


Thanks for your question.


You are registered on the child's birth certificate as their father with the consent of the mother then you acquired PR at that point (s4(1)(a) Childrens Act 1989. Unless there was a Court order made pursuant to your divorce (or in other family proceedings) which ended your PR then it will continue.


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Kind regards,


Customer: replied 6 years ago.
Thanks for that. just one quick query. Does it not matter that the birth was registered before December 1 2003, as I am aware PR is automatic after that.

I'm terribly sorry I misread the date.


Yes, you would not have acquired at the time of birth but would have acquired it upon marrying the mother. You would not have lost it in divorcing unless there was a court order to the contrary.


Sorry for the oversight.


Kind regards,



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