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Thomas
Thomas, Lawyer
Category: UK Law
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Experience:  BA (Hons), PgDip, Practising Solicitor
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I am a child born in 1936 to a British soldier stationed in

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I am a child born in 1936 to a British soldier stationed in Egypt. My mother was British but my father was born in Maritius in 1906 to a British soldier and a British woman.

What is my nationality under the act?

Hi,


Thanks for your question.

 

What type of passport was it? Was it a traditional UK passport or was it a British Overseas Citizen's passport?


Kind regards,

 

Tom

Customer: replied 6 years ago.

Sorry for the delay.

 

A traditional UK passport valid for 6 months.

 

The purpose was that the Army Air Corps unit I was with was moving from Tripoli, Libya to Nairobi, Kenya and we were to travel by air over the Sudan. It was only valid for 6 months so had to be renewed to allow me to travel by air back to the UK at the end of my 3 year term of overseas service.

 

Regards

 

Steve

 

Hi, Steve,

 

I've just got to go in to a meeting. I will respond in an hour or so if that's okay.

Tom

Customer: replied 6 years ago.

OK

 

Steve

Hi,

 

Sorry for the delay.

You cannot obtain a UK passport (as opposed to a UK Overseas Citizen passport) without being a UK citizen. You do not lose citizenship by expiry of time so you will still be a British Citizen now.

 

If you have taken on another nationality since 1966 then you may have by implication renounced you UK citizenship, but this would depend on the laws of the country whose nationality you have taken on. Some allow dual nationality (the UK does for example) but others do not.

 

If this is useful please kindly click accept so that I may be rewarded for my time. It will be gratefully received and you will be free to ask follow up questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Tom

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