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Michael Holly
Michael Holly, Solicitor
Category: UK Law
Satisfied Customers: 6496
Experience:  I have 20 years of experience as a solicitor in litigation and other areas
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As an Executor of a will what expenses are deemed reasonable

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As an Executor of a will what expenses are deemed reasonable for reimbursment?
It has been a 3-year process and the co-executor (a solicitor) has charged the estate ten thousand pounds. However he has told me that only professionals are allowed to claim expenses. I made 7 trips (240 miles round trip) to deal with the estate. I am a supply teacher and turned down work on these days in order to undertake my Executor duties. I did all the corresponding with the financial institutions (letter and telephone), council and utility companies, social services, care home etc.
I understand that I cannot claim for 'time', but can I claim for lost work, travel expenses and telephone and mail costs?

As an Executor you can only claim for expenses that you have actually incurred.

As such you can claim for travel expenses, telephone and mail costs but you can not claim for lost work.

It is understood that the role of Executor can be onerous and that it involves sacrificing your time which is why it is common for a testator to ask whether a person is willing to act as Executor.

I hope this helps kindly click accept so that I get credit for my answer.

Best wishes.


Your sincerely

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